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    The correct way to hold a pen

    What writing means to us

    Text and image: Astrid Frevel, Lecturer in Ergotherapy

    When we write, the structure in our brain changes; it is "trained" and learns. It is constantly evolving, so to speak. If we, whether child or adult, want to remember something, we write it down by hand.

    For students, writing also means learning. They acquire the written language and understand the letters and the words when writing.

    It is easier for us to remember things we have written down.

    The correct way to hold a pen

    How can I teach the schoolchild the right way to hold a pen? Is there a right way to hold a pen? How is the way we hold a pen economical and what are the variations?

    What basic requirements are important for a good pen hold? Writing is a graphomotoric skill, i.e. a fine motor skill. Good graphomotor skills allow relaxed and fluent writing.

    How important is economic pen holding?

    Let's start with sitting. You should be relaxed and upright in an adequate trunk posture when starting to write. Tight shoulders or excessive bending of the torso with the head on the table are unfavourable for a good and healthy posture. The forearm and wrist are on the table.

    The non-writing hand is also on the table and can hold the notebook. The writing should not require too much force; if the child pushes firmly on the desk pad or holds the pen tightly, then the hand becomes tired quickly.

    Writing with the entire arm and keeping the wrist stiff will result in pain that spreads to the arm and shoulder-neck region. In addition, writing speed and writing endurance are reduced, making the lines unclear and reducing the ability to read the handwriting.

    Here are some examples of difficult ways of holding a pen that will adversely affect the flow of writing and the speed. The writing is often difficult to read and, during writing, the child sometimes cannot see what they are writing.

    Paw grip: The index finger covers the thumb instead of resting on the pen.

    Cramped grip: The pen lies on the fingers and is guided with the thumb.

    The thumb is on one side whilst the index and middle finger are on the other side.

    The thumb grips above the index finger.

    The index and middle finger grip above the thumb.

    The whole hand is arched like a fist around the pen. The thumb is usually on the opposite side and holding against it.

    Fist grip: Pen is held with the whole fist

    The right way to hold a pen

    There is an optimal writing posture, but there is not the "one" correct writing posture. Many variations are possible. It is important that the beginner learns to write economically, easily and fluently with a relaxed pen hold from the start. Therefore, it is appropriate even at kindergarten age to teach children the three-point grip so that they can learn this pen hold for themselves. The thumb and forefinger grip the pen, which is placed on the front part of the middle finger. The thumb and forefinger guide the pen.

    Verse: In the car mum and dad sit in front and the three children sit behind.

    The longer a child has written in a strained pen hold, the longer it takes to correct the pen hold. From the age of 6, it is very difficult to correct and change the pen hold.

    If the pen hold should be changed, then permanently use and apply the new pen hold. There are a few tricks to help learn the correct way to hold a pen.

    Exercises for good pen holding

    In general, all fine motor exercises help and support to develop a well-adapted application of force. These include: threading beads, kneading, baking, gluing, cutting, crocheting, paper folding.

    More exercises for good and differentiated finger movement:

    Pen walking

    The finger tips hold the pen, the thumb is opposite the other fingers. Now your fingers walk the pen from bottom to top and vice versa. It is best to use both hands simultaneously, then the other hand cannot be used to help.

    Pen holding exercises

    Bead exercise: Bead has approx. 10 cm diameter

    Aids for achieving the correct way to hold a pen:

    Thicker pens

    Triangular pencils (try out hard or soft leads)

    Attachments for the fingers

    Please always make sure that the pen is not held too far down or up. For this, you can mark the area with tape.

    Source : www.lamy.com

    The Practical Art of Divine Magic: Contemporary & Ancient Techniques of Theurgy

    The ancient world of Egypt, Greece, and Rome was home to a set of magical and spiritual technologies, called theurgy, that unite the practice of magic with the aims of religion. Theurgy, or "godwork," is the art of creating a stronger bond between the theurgist and his or her deities. The results of this stronger bond were imminently practical: stronger magic, more meaningful existence, and a better life. With the fall of Rome, these techniques faded into obscurity, and many of them were lost forever. This book revives, restores, and reinvents these practices for a contemporary pagan or magical practitioner. A mixture of scholarly research and examination of source texts and daring experimentation and extrapolation leads to a complete and workable system that can inform a variety of practices, all presented in a relaxed, lighthearted, and readable way. Whether you practice witchcraft, ceremonial magic, or chaos magic, you can benefit from the practice of theurgy. You will learn techniques to create stronger bonds with divine forces, call up and communicate with spiritual beings, summon a magical assistant, create statues imbued with divine spirit, and master your own mind. The ultimate goal is union with the divine, but theurgy is a practical path, and every step on that path is designed to improve your life.

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    The Practical Art of Divine Magic: Contemporary & Ancient Techniques of Theurgy

    Patrick Dunn

    Llewellyn Worldwide, 8 Ağu 2015 - 336 sayfa

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    The ancient world of Egypt, Greece, and Rome was home to a set of magical and spiritual technologies, called theurgy, that unite the practice of magic with the aims of religion. Theurgy, or "godwork," is the art of creating a stronger bond between the theurgist and his or her deities. The results of this stronger bond were imminently practical: stronger magic, more meaningful existence, and a better life. With the fall of Rome, these techniques faded into obscurity, and many of them were lost forever.

    This book revives, restores, and reinvents these practices for a contemporary pagan or magical practitioner. A mixture of scholarly research and examination of source texts and daring experimentation and extrapolation leads to a complete and workable system that can inform a variety of practices, all presented in a relaxed, lighthearted, and readable way.

    Whether you practice witchcraft, ceremonial magic, or chaos magic, you can benefit from the practice of theurgy. You will learn techniques to create stronger bonds with divine forces, call up and communicate with spiritual beings, summon a magical assistant, create statues imbued with divine spirit, and master your own mind. The ultimate goal is union with the divine, but theurgy is a practical path, and every step on that path is designed to improve your life.

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    İçindekiler

    Referanslar

    İçindekiler

    Acknowledgments A Divine Technology What Is a God?

    The Addresses of the Gods

    Rituals and Tools of Theurgy

    Divination and Oracles

    AppendixPronunciation of Greek Words of Power

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    Accessed achieve Ancient Greek animal Apollo astrological begin called Chaldean Oracles Christianity contemplation Corpus Hermeticum course create culture daimones deity describes divine earth Egyptian Ennead eros esoteric Euthymios example exercise exist falcon fire genius give goal goddess gods Greek Magical Papyri harmony Hekate henosis Hermes Hermetica human Iamblichus imagine incense Janus Jupiter kakodaimones kind kledon Late Antiquity libation live logos look magicians means meditation memory mind moon mystery religions myth Neoplatonic Neoplatonists object occult offering one’s ourselves particular perhaps person perspective phantasm Philanike philosophers Phobetor planets Plato Plotinus practice prayer recipe relationship religion ritual Roman sacred sacrifice sense sometimes soul spells spirit statue STEP symbols synthema synthemata talisman Tefnut thaumaturgy there’s theurgist theurgy things traditional trans translation University Press virtue Walter Burkert What’s words world of matter worship writing Zeus

    Yazar hakkında (2015)

    Patrick Dunn (Chicago, IL) is a poet, linguist, Pagan, and a university English professor with a PhD in modern literature and language. His understanding of semiotics and the study of symbols arise from his training in linguistics and literary theory. He has practiced magic since childhood. Visit him online at https://pomomagic.wordpress.com.

    Kaynakça bilgileri

    Başlık The Practical Art of Divine Magic: Contemporary & Ancient Techniques of Theurgy

    Yazar Patrick Dunn

    Yayıncı Llewellyn Worldwide, 2015

    ISBN 0738746312, 9780738746319

    Uzunluk 336 sayfa

    Alıntıyı Dışa Aktar BiBTeX EndNote RefMan

    Google Kitaplar Hakkında - Gizlilik Politikaları - Hizmet   Şartları - Yayıncılar için Bilgiler - Sorun bildir - Yardım - Google Ana Sayfası

    Source : books.google.com.tr

    Writer’s Cramp: Why Does My Hand Hurt When I Write?

    Does your hand hurt when you write? If your hand cramps when writing, you may have writer's cramp. Learn what this means here.

    Writer’s Cramp: Why Does My Hand Hurt When I Write?

    Hand and Wrist 05/20/2019

    Despite all of the technological advances and society’s reliance on gadgets, there are those who still prefer to write the old-fashioned way, with a pen and paper. The same fine motor skills are also used for other types of tasks, such as playing a musical instrument, gardening, doing arts and crafts, and yes, even typing on a computer keyboard. All of these tasks, when done repeatedly, incorrectly, or under an intense amount of stress, can cause the brain to send the wrong signals to the hand muscles, resulting in Focal Hand Dystonia.

    What is Writer’s Cramp?

    Focal Hand Dystonia (FHD) or Writer’s Cramp, is a disorder that causes muscles to contract involuntarily. Writer’s cramp is caused when the brain sends incorrect signals to the muscles. It can affect the fingers, hands, and forearms.

    Symptoms of Writer’s Cramp

    The signs of Writer’s Cramp can vary in severity from one person to the next. However, they include any or a combination of the following symptoms:

    Muscle spasms

    Fingers very tightly gripping a pen, scissors, or buttons

    Fingers extending during activity, making it difficult to use the hands

    Weakness in the hands and fingers

    Fingers and hands that are non-responsive

    Wrists moving in unusual angles

    Types of Writer’s Cramp

    Simple. This type of writer’s cramp causes difficulty in performing a specific task. This task is often writing with a pen or pencil. Simple writer’s cramp is most often caused by the wrong placement of the pen in the hand, poor posture when writing and using your hand too much. A further consequence of this muscle strain, is that the writer can press down too hard on the paper. This in turn can lead to pain and muscle spasms.Dystonic. This type of cramp is far more generalized and can happen in any number of situations, involving a wide variety of motor functions. Also known as scrivener’s palsy or mogigraphia, this disorder will cause symptoms during any type of activity involving the hands: writing, eating, playing an instrument, applying makeup, shaving, buttoning a shirt and so forth.

    Causes of Writer’s Cramp

    Writer’s Cramp is caused by overuse, poor writing posture, or holding a pen or tool improperly.

    Risk Factors for Getting Writer’s Cramp

    Gene mutation called DYT1

    Family history Being male Trauma Exposure to poison

    Diagnosing Writer’s Cramp

    When a patient has symptoms of writer’s cramp, the doctor will perform a physical and neurological exam. This will help to determine which specific muscles are affected, and which types of activities trigger the cramps. They will also look for signs of related conditions, such as Carpal Tunnel Syndrome or arthritis.

    Treatment of Writer’s Cramp

    Treatment options depend on the severity of the muscle cramps. Some patients react well to physical or occupational therapy, while others require medication or injections. In rare instances, when conservative treatment doesn’t yield results, surgery may be necessary.

    Writer’s cramp has no cure. All treatment options are designed to alleviate symptoms and improve the patient’s quality of life.

    Complications of Writer’s Cramp

    Complications of writer’s cramp include:

    Tremors of the hand

    Development of symptoms in the other hand

    Dystonia in other parts of the body, such as the feet, neck, eyes, or vocal cords

    Writer’s Cramp Prevention

    While writer’s cramp cannot be prevented, there are things you can do to lower the risk of developing it. These include:

    Use proper technique. When using an instrument that requires repetitive hand movements, use proper form to avoid causing your muscles to move unnaturally.Do not push through fatigue. If you’re tired, take a break.Increase hand movements incrementally. Do not start from slight movements to exhausting your hands.

    Request an Appointment at The Orthopedic Clinic Today

    At The Orthopedic Clinic, we want you to live your life in full motion. If you’re experiencing symptoms related to writer’s cramp, let us help you. We’ll tailor a treatment plan that’s best for your lifestyle and get you back to doing the things you love.

    Call us at (386) 255-4596 to schedule an appointment.

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