if you want to remove an article from website contact us from top.

    you are providing care to a conscious infant who is choking. when giving chest thrusts, which of the following would you use?

    James

    Guys, does anyone know the answer?

    get you are providing care to a conscious infant who is choking. when giving chest thrusts, which of the following would you use? from EN Bilgi.

    First aid for a baby who is choking

    Learn first aid for a baby who is choking. They will be unable to cry, cough, make noise or breathe.

    Learn first aid for a baby who is choking

    A baby who is choking will be unable to cry, cough, make any noise or breathe.

    1. Give up to five back blows: hold the baby face-down along your thigh with their head lower than their bottom. Hit them firmly on their back between the shoulder blades up to five times. If back blows do not dislodge the blockage, move on to step 2.

    Back blows create a strong vibration and pressure in the airway, which is often enough to dislodge the blockage, allowing them to breathe again. Support their head while you hold them in position.

    2. Give up to five chest thrusts: turn the baby over so they are facing upwards. Place two fingers in the middle of their chest just below the nipples. Push sharply downwards up to five times.

    Chest thrusts squeeze the air out of the baby’s lungs and may dislodge the blockage.

    3. Call 999 if the blockage does not dislodge.

    Continue with cycles of back blows and chest thrusts until the blockage dislodges, help arrives or the baby becomes unresponsive. If you can’t call 999, get someone else to do it.

    Watch how to help a baby who is choking (1 minute)

    Common questions about first aid for a baby who is choking

    What can a baby choke on?

    How hard should the back blows be?

    Why do I have to hold a baby with its head lower than its bottom?

    Why do I have to support the head?

    Can I do abdominal thrusts (Heimlich manoeuvre) on a baby?

    Should I try to pull the object out with my fingers?

    What should I do if a baby becomes unresponsive and stops breathing?

    If a baby is choking, should I hold them upside down by their feet?

    How do I help a child who is choking?

    How do I help an adult who is choking?

    What can a baby choke on?

    Newborn babies can choke on things like curdled milk, mucus or vomit. As they get older, they move on to solids and explore by putting things into their mouth. This means food or small toys can easily get stuck in their throat, stopping them from breathing.

    Back to questions

    How hard should the back blows be?

    You should change the force of the back blows depending on the size of the baby: be gentler with a smaller baby than with a larger baby. The force you use to deliver the back blows should also be relative to your own strength. The back blows need to be hard enough to cause a vibration in the airway and dislodge the blockage.

    Back to questions

    Why do I have to hold a baby with its head lower than its bottom?

    Babies commonly choke on liquid (mucus or curdled milk), so keeping their head lower than their bottom helps the liquid to drain out – gravity will help.

    Back to questions

    Why do I have to support the head?

    Supporting the head will help to keep the baby’s airway open, helping to dislodge the blockage from the airway.

    Back to questions

    Can I do abdominal thrusts (Heimlich manoeuvre) on a baby?

    No, don’t squeeze a baby’s tummy.

    Abdominal thrusts are used to help choking children and adults only. Using abdominal thrusts on a baby could damage their internal organs, which are fragile and still developing.

    If back blows do not dislodge the blockage, you should use chest thrusts instead.

    Back to questions

    Should I try to pull the object out with my fingers?

    Do not put your fingers into their mouth if you cannot see an object. You risk pushing any blockage further down or damaging the back of the throat, which could swell and cause further harm.

    However, if you can clearly see an object in a baby's mouth and you are able to pluck it out safely with your fingertips, you could do so.

    Back to questions

    What should I do if a baby becomes unresponsive and stops breathing?

    Find out how to help a baby who is unresponsive and not breathing.

    Back to questions

    If a baby is choking, should I hold them upside down by their feet?

    No. This is not effective. You may cause further injury if you happen to drop them. The action of tipping them upside down may also move the blockage further down their throat.

    Back to questions

    How do I help a child who is choking?

    Find out how to help a child who is choking.

    Back to questions

    How do I help an adult who is choking?

    Find out how to help an adult who is choking.

    Back to questions

    Email us if you have any other questions about first aid for a baby who is choking.

    More first aid skills:

    First aid for a baby or child who has swallowed something harmful

    First aid for a baby or child who has a head injury

    Help communities cope in a crisis

    In 2021, we educated over one million children, young people and adults. Your donation will help us reach those who need it most through our free online resources and workshops building live-saving first aid and wellbeing skills.

    SUPPORT COMMUNITY EDUCATION

    You might also want to:

    You might also want to: Download the Baby and Child First Aid app

    Keep your little ones safe with our free app.

    Find out more

    Learn first aid on a course

    Find out about our first aid for baby and child course.

    Find out more

    Is this page useful?

    YES NO

    Source : www.redcross.org.uk

    How To Treat the Choking Conscious Infant

    How To Treat the Choking Conscious Infant - Etiology, pathophysiology, symptoms, signs, diagnosis & prognosis from the Merck Manuals - Medical Professional Version.

    How To Treat the Choking Conscious Infant

    By

    Dorothy Habrat

    , DO, University of New Mexico School of Medicine

    Last full review/revision Aug 2019| Content last modified Mar 2021

    CLICK HERE FOR PATIENT EDUCATION

    Choking in an infant is usually caused by a small object the baby has placed in its mouth (eg, food, toy, button, coin, or balloon). If the airway obstruction is severe, then back blows followed by chest thrusts are administered to dislodge the object.

    (See also Overview of Respiratory Arrest and Airway Establishment and Control.)

    Indications for Treating Choking Conscious Infant

    Severe upper airway obstruction in an infant (under age 1 year), caused by choking on a foreign object.

    Signs of severe airway obstruction in an infant include

    Cyanosis Retractions

    Inability to cry or make much sound

    Weak, ineffective coughing

    Stridor

    such infants do not have severe airway obstruction. Furthermore, strong coughs and cries can help push the object out of the airway.

    Contraindications to Treating Choking Conscious Infant

    Absolute contraindications:

    Do not do back blows or chest thrusts if the infant stops breathing for reasons other than an obstructed airway (eg, asthma, infection, swelling, or a blow to the head).

    Relative contraindications:

    None

    Complications of Treating Choking Conscious Infant

    Rib injury or fracture

    Internal organ injury

    Equipment for Treating Choking Conscious Infant

    None

    Additional Considerations

    This rapid first aid procedure is done immediately wherever the infant is choking.

    Positioning for Treating Choking Conscious Infant

    For back blows, place the infant prone along your forearm, using your thigh or lap for support. Hold the infant’s chest in your hand and the jaw with your fingers. Tilt the infant head-downward, such that the head is lower than the body (see figure Back blows—infant).

    For chest thrusts, place the infant supine along your forearm, using your thigh or lap for support. Hold the back of the infant's head in your hand. Again, incline the infant such that the head is dependent to the body (see figure Chest thrusts—infant).

    Back blows—infant

    Chest thrusts—infant

    Chest thrusts are delivered on the lower half of the sternum, just below the nipple level.

    Relevant Anatomy for Treating Choking Conscious Infant

    The epiglottis usually protects the airway from aspiration of foreign objects. Objects that are aspirated beyond the epiglottis may be stopped by the vocal cords in the larynx and, at this level or below, cause life-threatening airway obstruction.

    In infants and children, the cricoid cartilage, which lies inferior to the vocal cords, is the narrowest part of the upper airway. Sometimes, objects become trapped between the vocal cords and the cricoid ring, resulting in an obstruction that is particularly difficult to clear.

    Step-by-Step Description of Procedure

    Determine if there is severe airway obstruction, which may endanger the infant’s life. Look for signs of severe airway obstruction, such as the inability to cry audibly, cough effectively, or breathe adequately (eg, stridor, retractions, cyanosis).

    If the infant has a strong cry or is coughing hard, do not do these procedures. If you have determined that the infant has severe airway obstruction, proceed with the following procedures.

    Tell someone to call 911 while you begin first aid. If you are alone, shout for help and begin first aid.

    Hold the infant face-down along your forearm using your thigh or lap for support. Hold the infant’s chest in your hand and open the jaw by pulling the mandible with your fingers. Point the infant’s head downward and lower than the body.

    Give up to 5 quick, forceful back blows between the infant’s shoulder blades using the palm of your free hand.

    Check the mouth to see whether the aspirated foreign body is visible; if it can be easily removed, remove it.

    If the object does not come out of the airway after 5 back blows, turn the infant face-up.

    Hold the infant face-up along your forearm using your thigh or lap for support. Hold the head in your hand with the head lower than the torso.

    Place 2 fingers on the middle of the infant’s sternum just below the nipples. Avoid the lower ribs or the tip of the sternum.

    Give up to 5 quick thrusts, compressing the chest about 1/3 to ½ the depth of the chest—usually about 1.5 to 4 cm (0.5 to 1.5 inches) for each thrust.

    Continue to deliver 5 back blows followed by 5 chest thrusts until the object is dislodged or the infant becomes unconscious.

    Do not try to grasp and pull out the object if the infant is conscious.

    If the infant becomes unresponsive (unconscious), shout for help and begin infant cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). If you are alone, after 1 minute of CPR call 911.

    If the infant is unconscious and you can see the object blocking the airway, try to remove it with a finger. Try to remove the object only if you can see it.

    Source : www.merckmanuals.com

    Lifeguarding: Section 1

    Exam A- CPR Learn with flashcards, games, and more — for free.

    Lifeguarding: Section 1- CPR/AED for the Professional Rescuer and First Aid Flash Cards version 2.

    How can you best protect yourself from possible bloodborne pathogen transmission when providing care?

    Click card to see definition 👆

    Use personal protective equipment (PPE),

    such as disposable gloves and a breathing

    barrier, when providing care.

    Click again to see term 👆

    While having a snack in the concession area, a child suddenly clutches his throat with both hands.

    You ask him if he is choking and he frantically nods yes. You activate your facility's emergency action plan (EAP). You identify yourself as a lifeguard and

    obtain consent from the parents. What should you do next?

    Click card to see definition 👆

    Stand or kneel behind the victim and give

    5 back blows and 5 abdominal thrusts.

    Click again to see term 👆

    1/71 Created by verncotterell Exam A- CPR

    Terms in this set (71)

    How can you best protect yourself from possible bloodborne pathogen transmission when providing care?

    Use personal protective equipment (PPE),

    such as disposable gloves and a breathing

    barrier, when providing care.

    While having a snack in the concession area, a child suddenly clutches his throat with both hands.

    You ask him if he is choking and he frantically nods yes. You activate your facility's emergency action plan (EAP). You identify yourself as a lifeguard and

    obtain consent from the parents. What should you do next?

    Stand or kneel behind the victim and give

    5 back blows and 5 abdominal thrusts.

    You and another lifeguard find an unconscious adult on the floor in the locker room. You activate your facility's EAP, size-up the scene and perform a primary assessment. You find the victim is not moving or breathing, but has a pulse. You should

    summon EMS personnel, then:

    Give 1 rescue breath about every 5 seconds.

    You come upon a scene where a patron appears to be injured. Before approaching the victim, which of the following will you not do as you size-up

    the scene?

    Begin the primary assessment.

    When providing care during an emergency, what should you do first?

    Size-up the scene.

    As the first lifeguard on the scene, you are performing CPR on an adult. When performing chest compressions, how deeply should you compress the chest?

    At least 2 inches

    CPR should be performed on which of the following victims?

    One who is in cardiac arrest

    What is the first step of the Cardiac Chain of Survival?

    Early recognition and access to the emergency medical services (EMS) system

    You are providing care to a victim having a heart attack. What do you do first?

    Summon EMS personnel.

    Once you have turned on the automated external defibrillator (AED), you should:

    Apply the pads and allow the AED to analyze the heart rhythm.

    Sign up and see the remaining cards. It’s free!

    Boost your grades with unlimited access to millions of flashcards, games and more.

    Continue with Google

    Continue with Facebook

    Already have an account?

    Sets with similar terms

    Lifeguard Online Exam

    40 terms IsaelKu32

    RED CROSS LIFEGUARDING ONLINE ANSWERS

    40 terms Jbashark

    RED CROSS LIFEGUARDING ONLINE ANSWERS

    40 terms Grace_Aronoff

    CPR/AED for Professional Rescures and First A…

    41 terms samantha_moss1209

    Sets found in the same folder

    Lifeguard course

    40 terms jasmingleek

    American Red Cross Lifeguard Tests A

    38 terms czampetti

    Life Guarding Test

    74 terms ToddGilman

    LIFEGUARD

    35 terms oberstfamily

    Other sets by this creator

    Learners Permit Test Part 4

    84 terms verncotterell

    Learners Permit Test Part 3

    86 terms verncotterell

    Learners Permit Test Part 2

    86 terms verncotterell

    Learners Permit Questions

    86 terms verncotterell

    Other Quizlet sets

    American Red Cross Lifeguard Tests A

    75 terms study127

    American Red Cross Lifeguard Tests A

    75 terms Katherine_Davis328

    American Red Cross Lifeguard Tests A

    75 terms MahHelen

    Lifeguard Cards Pt 2

    71 terms cdd757

    Related questions

    QUESTION

    The best way to move a patient from the stretcher to a bed?

    2 answers QUESTION

    What is the management of IBS?

    15 answers QUESTION

    What is a contraindication to giving the tetanus, diphtheria, pertussis (Tdap)/DtaP vaccine?

    15 answers QUESTION

    What is the MC injured ankle ligament?

    15 answers 1/5

    Source : quizlet.com

    Do you want to see answer or more ?
    James 12 day ago
    4

    Guys, does anyone know the answer?

    Click For Answer