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    why must lobbyists register with the government and report their activities annually? to provide transparency on how lobbyists and government officials interact to ensure that corrupt practices can be tracked and taxed appropriately to make sure that government employees are in the right buildings during working hours to track which lobbyists are the most successful at influencing changes in policy

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    Interest Groups & Lobbying Flashcards

    Study with Quizlet and memorize flashcards terms like How does lobbying benefit the government? Lobbying simplifies the decision-making process for lawmakers. Lobbying presents all interests equally. Lobbying helps educate and inform lawmakers. Lobbying ensures all citizens' opinions inform government decisions., Which of these is considered a benefit of lobbying? Lobbying ensures that lawmakers are well funded for the next election. Lobbying facilitates communication between the public and lawmakers. Lobbying creates an advantage in government for wealthier citizens and corporations. Lobbying reduces opportunities for corruption in government because it reduces the role of money., The ____________ is the governmental body that regulates political action committees (PACs). and more.

    Interest Groups & Lobbying

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    How does lobbying benefit the government?

    Lobbying simplifies the decision-making process for lawmakers.

    Lobbying presents all interests equally.

    Lobbying helps educate and inform lawmakers.

    Lobbying ensures all citizens' opinions inform government decisions.

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    C

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    Which of these is considered a benefit of lobbying?

    Lobbying ensures that lawmakers are well funded for the next election.

    Lobbying facilitates communication between the public and lawmakers.

    Lobbying creates an advantage in government for wealthier citizens and corporations.

    Lobbying reduces opportunities for corruption in government because it reduces the role of money.

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    B

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    1/10 Created by aftermists

    Terms in this set (10)

    How does lobbying benefit the government?

    Lobbying simplifies the decision-making process for lawmakers.

    Lobbying presents all interests equally.

    Lobbying helps educate and inform lawmakers.

    Lobbying ensures all citizens' opinions inform government decisions.

    C

    Which of these is considered a benefit of lobbying?

    Lobbying ensures that lawmakers are well funded for the next election.

    Lobbying facilitates communication between the public and lawmakers.

    Lobbying creates an advantage in government for wealthier citizens and corporations.

    Lobbying reduces opportunities for corruption in government because it reduces the role of money.

    B

    The ____________ is the governmental body that regulates political action committees (PACs).

    Federal Election Commission

    Which of these are true of political action committees (PACs) but not of interest groups? Select all that apply.

    PACs promote social causes.

    PACs provide financial support to political campaigns.

    PACs are international organizations.

    PACs are supported by corporate interests.

    PACs are regulated by the Federal Election Commission.

    PACs provide financial support to political campaigns.

    PACs are regulated by the Federal Election Commission.

    Which best describes what economic interest groups generally support?

    tax reform

    government subsidies

    business interests international trade C

    Which best describes how the information lobbyists provide to lawmakers is significant?

    Lobbyists are allowed to provide false information to undermine opponents.

    Lobbyists have access to information that may not be available to others, even politicians.

    Lobbyists offer precise information on voter positions, which politicians can use in elections.

    Lobbyists can present information in a way that supports their clients' positions.

    D

    A lobbyist's job includes

    researching and understanding issues being considered by lawmakers.

    practicing law and defending clients in court.

    registering with the government and getting a specialized license.

    making political connections and giving gifts to lawmakers in exchange for support.

    A

    Why must lobbyists register with the government and report their activities annually?

    to provide transparency on how lobbyists and government officials interact

    to ensure that corrupt practices can be tracked and taxed appropriately

    to make sure that government employees are in the right buildings during working hours

    to track which lobbyists are the most successful at influencing changes in policy

    A

    Which best describes why making political allies is a key strategy for lobbyists?

    It reduces competition between opposing lobbyists.

    It enables multiple issues to be addressed at once.

    It places more pressure on lawmakers to vote a certain way.

    It increases the number of supporting votes for pending legislation.

    C

    Do lobbyists exert influence among all three branches of government? Why or why not?

    Yes, they advise on rules and legislation and file briefs with the courts.

    No, they focus on developing legislation.

    Yes, they influence the election of officials to all three branches.

    No, the courts are immune to outside influences.

    A

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    Lobbyisme Québec

    Lobbying Transparency and Ethics Act

    THEIR ROLE

    Lobbying Transparency and Ethics Act

    LEGITIMACY OF LOBBYING

    LOBBYISTS REGISTRY

    ACCESS TO INFORMATION

    TOOLS FOR THE PUBLIC AND THE MEDIA

    The Lobbying Transparency and Ethics Act   was adopted unanimously by the National Assembly on June 13, 2002. It recognizes the legitimacy of lobbying and the right of the public to know who is attempting to influence the decision-makers of parliamentary, government and municipal institutions.

    When they attempt to influence decisions with elected officials and public servants, lobbyists must register in the Lobbyists Registry and respect the Code of Conduct for Lobbyists.

    The Lobbyists Registry (www.lobby.gouv.qc.ca  ) concretizes the transparency of lobbying activities. The registrations must always reflect the actual lobbying activities in which the lobbyists engage. By consulting the Registry, the public is informed of the lobbyists’ attempt to influence. Before decisions are made, the public in turn may address elected officials and public servants and thus participate in public decision-making processes.

    Like the Québec legislation on political party financing or access to information, the Lobbying Transparency and Ethics Act contributes to improve democratic life and strengthen public confidence in public institutions.

    Main points of the Act

    In short, the Lobbying Transparency and Ethics Act:

    defines lobbying activities and establishes classes of lobbyists;

    provides for the registration and update, in a public registry, of information pertaining, in particular, to lobbyists and the subject-matter of their activities;

    entrusts the Lobbyists Registrar with the responsibility for keeping the Lobbyists Registry;

    stipulates that the Commissioner of Lobbying is appointed by the National Assembly and therefore is independent of the government administration;

    gives the Commissioner of Lobbying the mandate to monitor and control lobbying activities;

    gives the Commissioner the powers required to conduct inspections and inquiries regarding any breach of the Act or the Code;

    provides for the Commission to draft and adopt a Code of Conduct for Lobbyists;

    prohibits certain lobbying practices;

    provides for disciplinary measures and penalties in case of a breach of the Act or the Code;

    stipulates that the commissioner can issue confidentiality orders.

    An Act that implements fundamental rights

    The Lobbying Transparency and Ethics Act implements fundamental rights guaranteed by the Canadian and Québec Charters. For example:

    the right to information;

    freedom of expression;

    the right to vote.

    In a democracy, the public can exercise these rights effectively only if the transparency of public institutions is concrete.

    Access to information enables them to understand the choices the public authorities must face.

    See the complete version of the Lobbying Transparency and Ethics Act  , the Code of Conduct for Lobbyists   and the Lobbying Transparency and Ethics Act Exclusions Regulation  .

    Source : lobbyisme.quebec

    2. Transparency

    OECD's dissemination platform for all published content - books, podcasts, serials and statistics

    2. Transparency

    Abstract

    This chapter assesses the level of implementation in countries of the transparency principles of the Recommendation on Principles for Transparency and Integrity in Lobbying. The findings show that in a majority of countries, there is limited transparency on the targets of lobbying activities and on the actors conducting lobbying activities, and that the information disclosed is not enough to allow for public scrutiny. The chapter also shows that further light needs to be shed on all the different ways it is now possible to influence the policy-making process, and notes how compliance can be promoted through engagement with lobbyists and the use of digital tools. It also finds that audit and review of the rules and guidelines on lobbying is limited.

    Introduction

    Transparency is the disclosure and subsequent accessibility of relevant government data and information (OECD, 2017[1]). The OECD Recommendation of the Council on Principles for Transparency and Integrity in Lobbying [OECD/LEGAL/0379] (hereafter “Lobbying Principles”) states that Adherents “should provide an adequate degree of transparency to ensure that public officials, citizens and businesses can obtain sufficient information on lobbying activities” (Principle 5) (OECD, 2010[2]). Transparency is thus a tool that allows for public scrutiny of the public decision-making process. As such, Adherents are encouraged to “enable stakeholders – including civil society organisations, businesses, the media and the general public – to scrutinise lobbying activities” (Principle 6) (OECD, 2010[2]). When designing rules or guidelines on lobbying, notably to provide transparency and permit public scrutiny, Adherents are asked to “clearly define the terms ‘lobbying’ and ‘lobbyist’ when they consider or develop rules and guidelines on lobbying” (Principle 4).

    In addition, transparency requirements cannot achieve their objective unless the regulated actors comply with them and oversight entities effectively enforce them. The Lobbying Principles therefore encourage Adherents to implement a “coherent spectrum of strategies and mechanisms” to ensure compliance with transparency measures (Principle 9). The Lobbying Principles also call on Adherents to review the functioning of their rules and guidelines related to lobbying on a periodic basis and make necessary adjustments in light of experience (Principle 10).

    The 2014 report monitoring the implementation of the Lobbying Principles acknowledged that transparency measures were needed to encourage trust in public decision making, reduce actual or perceived problems of influence peddling by lobbyists, and restore the integrity of lobbying professions. Governments regulating lobbying had commonly chosen public registers as key components of transparency schemes, but varying amounts and types of information were disclosed and made public. Although financial disclosure was seen as crucial by lobbyists and legislators, filing contributions to political campaigns, along with other lobbying information, was required by only two lobbying registers, and only one register made the information publicly available. In general, Adherents struggled to operate efficient disclosure tools and mechanisms that ensured informed decision making and transparent lobbying. Most of the lobbyists surveyed said that government sanctions were either non-existent or non-deterrent, leaving little or no incentive to comply with regulations (OECD, 2014[3]).

    Since then, transparency in lobbying activities by disclosure of and access to lobbying information has increased. In 2020, 18 countries had public registries with information on lobbyists and/or lobbying activities. Some countries have placed the onus on public officials, by requiring them to disclose information on their meetings through so-called “open agendas”. Nine of the 18 countries indicated they require certain public officials to make their agendas public or disclose their meetings with lobbyists. However, levels of transparency vary across countries, and some of the measures in place provide only limited transparency on the influence process. The following findings suggest where more attention is needed:

    Transparency on the targets of lobbying activities is limited.

    Transparency on who is conducting lobbying activities is limited.

    More transparency is needed on all forms of influence.

    Information disclosed is usually incomplete and does not allow for public scrutiny.

    Engagement with lobbyists and digital tools are used to promote compliance.

    Audit and review of the rules and guidelines on lobbying is limited.

    Transparency on the targets of lobbying activities is limited

    Policy making takes place in a variety of public entities in all branches and levels of government. Transparency on policy makers or decision makers is thus vital, regardless where the policy maker sits. It is not easy to implement this principle in practice, given the different governance arrangements in countries, and the varying levels of independence or autonomy between branches and levels of government. As a result, information on the officials subject to lobbying activities is limited, more specifically:

    Few countries are transparent about lobbying activities targeting all branches of government.

    Transparency is still the exception at the subnational level.

    Source : www.oecd-ilibrary.org

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