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    Jefferson Davis Elected President of the Confederate States of America

    Civil War (1860-1865)

    Jefferson Davis, President of the Confederate States of America

    Jefferson Davis Elected President of the Confederate States of America

    November 6, 1861

    Who was president during the Civil War? If you were from a Northern state, you answered Abraham Lincoln. If you were from a Southern state, you may have answered Jefferson Davis.

    On November 6, 1861, Jefferson Davis was elected president, not of the United States of America but of the Confederate States of America. He ran unopposed and was elected to serve for a six-year term. Davis had already been serving as the temporary president for almost a year.

    How do you think President Lincoln, who had earlier been elected president of the United States, reacted to the Southern election?

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    President of the Confederate States of America

    President of the Confederate States of America

    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    Jump to navigation Jump to search President of the Confederate States

    Seal of the Confederate States

    Only officeholder

    Jefferson Davis

    February 18, 1861 – May 5, 1865

    Provisional: February 18, 1861 – February 22, 1862

    Style His Excellency

    Type Head of state Head of government Residence Executive Mansion, Montgomery, Alabama (1861) Executive Mansion, Richmond, Virginia (1861–1865) Seat

    Alabama State Capitol,

    Montgomery, Alabama (1861) President's Office, Custom House, Richmond, Virginia (1861–1865) Sutherlin House, Danville, Virginia (1865) Appointer Congress (provisional) Electoral College (permanent) Term length One year (provisional) Six years (permanent)

    Constituting instrument Constitution of the Confederate States

    Formation February 18, 1861 (provisional) February 22, 1862 (permanent)

    First holder Jefferson Davis

    Final holder Jefferson Davis

    Abolished May 5, 1865

    Deputy Vice president

    Salary CS$25,000 per year

    The president of the Confederate States was the head of state and head of government of the Confederate States. The president was the chief executive of the federal government and was the commander-in-chief of the Confederate Army and the Confederate Navy.[1]

    Article II of the Constitution of the Confederate States vested executive power of the Confederacy in the president. The power included execution of law, along with responsibility for appointing executive, diplomatic, regulatory and judicial officers, and concluding treaties with foreign powers with the advice and consent of the senate. He was further empowered to grant reprieves and pardons, and convene and adjourn either or both houses of Congress under extraordinary circumstances.[1]

    The president was indirectly elected by the people through the Electoral College to a six-year term, and was one of only two nationally elected Confederate officers, the other being the vice president. On February 18, 1861, Jefferson Davis became president of the provisional government, as well as the only person to assume the position. On February 22, 1862, he became president of the permanent government and served in that capacity until the Confederacy's military collapse. The Confederate States cabinet declared the Confederacy dissolved May 5, 1865, after which Davis stopped attempting to exercise his office's powers and duties. May 5 is therefore generally considered to be the day the Confederate States of America (and its presidency) were formally abolished. Davis himself was captured by elements of the United States Cavalry five days later.[2]

    Contents

    1 Powers and duties 2 Election and oath 3 Compensation 4 Post-presidency

    5 List of presidents

    5.1 Notes

    6 Fictional presidents of the Confederate States of America

    7 See also 8 References 9 Further reading 10 External links

    Powers and duties[edit]

    The constitutional powers of the president of the Confederate States were similar to those of the president of the United States. The permanent Confederate States Constitution made him commander-in-chief of the Army, Navy and militia of the confederated states when called into service of the Confederate States. He was also empowered to grant reprieves and pardons for offenses against the Confederate States. He was authorized to make treaties; to nominate and appoint diplomatic representatives, judges, and other officers of the Confederate States (including the heads of the executive departments) by and with the consent of the Confederate States Senate; and to remove such representatives and officers. During a Senate recess, he could fill vacancies but not reappoint persons previously rejected by the Senate. He was to supply Congress with information, recommend legislation, receive ambassadors and other public ministers, see that federal laws were faithfully executed, and commission all officers of the military and naval forces of the Confederate States.[2]

    Election and oath[edit]

    Confederate election ballot, Virginia, November 6, 1861

    1861 Inauguration of Jefferson Davis at the Capitol, Montgomery, Alabama

    On February 9, 1861, the provisional congress at Montgomery unanimously elected Jefferson Davis president and Alexander H. Stephens vice president. Stephens, who was a delegate to Congress from Georgia, was inaugurated on February 11. Davis was inaugurated on February 18 upon his arrival from Mississippi, where he had gone upon his resignation from the U.S. Senate. Confederate presidents were to be limited to a single term. Davis and Stephens were elected on Wednesday November 6, 1861 for six-years terms, as provided by the permanent constitution. The Capital had been moved in June 1861 to Richmond and the inauguration took place at the statue of Washington on Capitol Square on February 22, 1862.[2]

    Source : en.wikipedia.org

    Jefferson Davis

    Jefferson Davis, in full Jefferson Finis Davis, (born June 3, 1808, Christian county, Kentucky, U.S.—died December 6, 1889, New Orleans, Louisiana), president of the Confederate States of America throughout its existence during the American Civil War (1861–65). After the war he was imprisoned for two years and indicted for treason but was never tried. Jefferson Davis was the 10th and last child of Samuel Emory Davis, a Georgia-born planter of Welsh ancestry who had fought in the American Revolution. When Jefferson Davis, who was named for Thomas Jefferson, was age three, his family settled on a plantation called Rosemont in

    Jefferson Davis

    president of Confederate States of America

    Alternate titles: Jefferson Finis Davis

    By Hudson Strode • Edit History

    Jefferson Davis See all media

    Born: June 3, 1808 Kentucky

    Died: December 6, 1889 (aged 81) New Orleans Louisiana

    Title / Office: United States Senate (1848-1861), United States

    Notable Family Members: spouse Varina Davis

    Role In: American Civil War Battle of Fort Sumter

    See all related content →

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    Jefferson Davis, in full Jefferson Finis Davis, (born June 3, 1808, Christian county, Kentucky, U.S.—died December 6, 1889, New Orleans, Louisiana), president of the Confederate States of America throughout its existence during the American Civil War (1861–65). After the war he was imprisoned for two years and indicted for treason but was never tried.

    Early life and career

    Learn about the personal and political life of Jefferson Davis from his great-great-grandson Bertram Hayes-Davis

    Overview of the life of Jefferson Davis, president of the Confederate States of America (1861–65) during the American Civil War.

    © Civil War Trust (A Britannica Publishing Partner)

    See all videos for this article

    Jefferson Davis was the 10th and last child of Samuel Emory Davis, a Georgia-born planter of Welsh ancestry who had fought in the American Revolution. When Jefferson Davis, who was named for Thomas Jefferson, was age three, his family settled on a plantation called Rosemont in Woodville, Mississippi. At age seven he was sent for three years to a Dominican boys’ school in Kentucky, and at age 13 he entered Transylvania College, Lexington, Kentucky. He later spent four years at the United States Military Academy at West Point, graduating 23rd in a class of 33 in 1828. At both Transylvania and West Point, Davis’s best friend was the future Confederate general Albert Sidney Johnston. In the class behind Davis at West Point were two other cadets who would become prominent Confederate generals, Robert E. Lee and Joseph E. Johnston.

    Davis served as a lieutenant in the Wisconsin Territory and afterward in the Black Hawk War under the colonel and future president Zachary Taylor, whose daughter Sarah Knox would become Davis’s wife. According to a contemporary description, Davis in his mid-20s was “handsome, witty, sportful, and altogether captivating.” After being posted in Arkansas for two years, Davis resigned his commission in 1835, married Knox, and became a planter near Vicksburg, Mississippi, on land given to him by his wealthy eldest brother, Joseph. Within three months his bride died of malarial fever. Grief-stricken, Davis stayed in virtual seclusion for seven years, creating a plantation out of a wilderness and reading prodigiously in constitutional law and world literature.

    In 1845 Davis, a Democrat, was elected to the U.S. House of Representatives and married Varina Howell, a Natchez, Mississippi, aristocrat who was 18 years his junior and the granddaughter of a former governor of New Jersey. In 1846 Davis resigned his seat in Congress to serve in the Mexican-American War as a colonel in command of the First Mississippi volunteers. He became a national hero for winning the Battle of Buena Vista (1847) with tactics that won plaudits even in the European press. After returning to Mississippi severely wounded, he entered the Senate and soon became chairman of the Military Affairs Committee. In 1851 Davis ran unsuccessfully for governor of Mississippi. Pres. Franklin Pierce made him secretary of war in 1853. Davis enlarged the army, strengthened coastal defenses, and directed three surveys for railroads to the Pacific. He was also a forceful advocate for what became the Gadsden Purchase.

    Davis, Varina Varina Davis.

    Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc.

    The children of Jefferson and Varina Davis.

    Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    In 1857, after Pierce left office, Davis returned to the Senate. During the period of mounting intersectional strife, Davis spoke widely in both North and South, urging harmony between the sections. In the 1860 presidential election, Davis opposed the candidate of Northern Democrats Stephen A. Douglas, a champion of popular sovereignty, and joined Southern Democrats in supporting John C. Breckinridge, who demanded federal government protection for slave holdings in the territories and ran on a separate ticket. When South Carolina withdrew from the Union in December 1860, Davis still opposed secession, though he believed that the Constitution gave a state the right to withdraw from the original compact of states. He was among those who believed that the newly elected president, Abraham Lincoln, would coerce the South and that the result would be disastrous.

    President of the Confederacy

    Source : www.britannica.com

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