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    who suffered when louis xiv revoked the edict of nantes?

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    The period of the Revocation of the Edict of Nantes (1661

    The period of the Revocation of the Edict of Nantes (1661-1700)

    The Revocation of the Edict of Nantes by Louis XIV in 1685 led to the suppression of the Reformed Church in France and forced Protestants into exile or hiding. As a result they lost all social identity.

    From repression to Revocation

    Louis XIV signing the Revocation of the Edict of Nantes in Fontainebleau © S.H.P.F.

    The Revocation of the Edict of Nantes was preceded by a series of repressive measures against Protestants and the Reformed Church. This anti-Reformation policy of King Louis XIV was trying to bring about religious unity in his kingdom.

    As this policy was deemed insufficient, the powers that be resorted to force : “dragonnades” and forced lodging of soldiers in Protestant homes, with the freedom to loot and bully. The terrorised Protestants recanted in large numbers.

    Faced with this situation, Louis XIV revoked the Edict of Nantes with the Edict of Fontainebleau. This new Edict forbade religious practice for the Protestant Reformed Church and stipulated that all their church buildings should be pulled down. Pastors had to recant or go into exile. The faithful lost their identity as Protestants and were declared Catholics. Many chose to emigrate, even though it was forbidden, rather than to submit.

    The Edict of Fontainebleau aroused violent outbursts : in France, the Catholics approved of it but abroad, the means used to implement it triggered muted disapproval or indignation.

    The Protestants who remained in France were called the “new converts” and had to comply with Catholic religious practice, that is : attend Mass, have their children baptised and receive Extreme Unction when dying.

    Many new converts kept on practicing their Reformed religion within their own family circle, in private gatherings or in secret meetings held in the open air or remote areas. When they were caught, repression was harsh : the ones who opposed the ban faced prison or the galley.

    Bibliography

    Books

    BERGEAL Catherine et DURRLEMAN Alain, Éloge et condamnation de la Révocation, La Cause, 1987

    Associated notes

    The anti-Reform policy (1661-1685)

    In order to implement his policy of restricting the “allegedly Reformed religion”, King Louis XIV first resorted to legal, peaceful means and then to force.

    The "Dragonnades" (1681-1685)

    A “Dragonnade” was the forced lodging of dragoons, the king’s soldiers, in Huguenot homes. The latter were looted and mistreated until they renounced their faith.

    The new converts

    When the Edict of Nantes was revoked, nearly all the Protestants who had decided to stay in France had renounced Protestantism : these were the “new converts”. Their attendance at Catholic...

    The secret meetings

    Long before the Revocation of the Edict of Nantes in 1685, freedom of worship for Protestants was already being questioned. Following the Revocation of the Edict of Nantes, three quarters...

    The Edict of Fontainebleau or the Revocation (1685)

    In October 1685, Louis XIV signed the Edict of Fontainebleau which repealed the Edict of Nantes. It banned Protestant worship and the emigration of Protestants. Pastors were banished.

    Associated tours

    The revocation of the Edict of Nantes and its consequences (1685-1700)

    In October 1685 Louis XIV signed the Edict of Fontainebleau revoking the Edict of Nantes. It forbade exercising the Protestant faith and any migrating of Protestants. Pastors were granted a...

    Source : museeprotestant.org

    Who suffered when Louis XIV revoked the Edict of Nantes?

    Find an answer to your question Who suffered when Louis XIV revoked the Edict of Nantes?

    elizabeth96024 13.12.2018 History Secondary School answered

    Who suffered when Louis XIV revoked the Edict of Nantes?

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    Louis XIV - the Sun King: Revocation of Edict of Nantes. 1598, decree promulgated at Nantes by King Henry IV to restore internal peace in France, which had been torn by the Wars of Religion; the edict defined the rights of the French Protestants

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    The French Protestant.

    Explanation:

    The French Protestants were the sufferer when Louis XIV removed the Edict of Nantes.

    The Edict of Nantes was introduced by Henry IV of France to end the Wars of Religion that began in 1562 between Huguenot and Catholicism.

    In 1685, Louis XIV abolished the Edict of Nantes and removed all religions from the country along with civil liberties.

    Revoke of the Edict of Nantes led many Huguenot to emigrate to America, England, and Holland.

    Learn More:Features of Edicts of Nantes​

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    Edict of Nantes

    Edict of Nantes, French Édit de Nantes, law promulgated at Nantes in Brittany on April 13, 1598, by Henry IV of France, which granted a large measure of religious liberty to his Protestant subjects, the Huguenots. The edict was accompanied by Henry IV’s own conversion from Huguenot Calvinism to Roman Catholicism and brought an end to the violent Wars of Religion that began in 1562. The controversial edict was one of the first decrees of religious tolerance in Europe and granted unheard-of religious rights to the French Protestant minority. The edict upheld Protestants in freedom of conscience and permitted them

    Edict of Nantes

    French history

    Alternate titles: Edit de Nantes

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    By The Editors of Encyclopaedia Britannica • Edit History

    Edict of Nantes See all media

    Date: April 13, 1598

    Location: France Nantes

    Context: Wars of Religion

    Key People: Henry IV

    See all related content →

    Edict of Nantes, French Édit de Nantes, law promulgated at Nantes in Brittany on April 13, 1598, by Henry IV of France, which granted a large measure of religious liberty to his Protestant subjects, the Huguenots. The edict was accompanied by Henry IV’s own conversion from Huguenot Calvinism to Roman Catholicism and brought an end to the violent Wars of Religion that began in 1562. The controversial edict was one of the first decrees of religious tolerance in Europe and granted unheard-of religious rights to the French Protestant minority.

    The edict upheld Protestants in freedom of conscience and permitted them to hold public worship in many parts of the kingdom, though not in Paris. It granted them full civil rights, including access to education, and established a special court, the Chambre de l’Édit, composed of both Protestants and Catholics, to deal with disputes arising from the edict. Protestant pastors were to be paid by the state and released from certain obligations. Militarily, the Protestants could keep the places they were still holding in August 1597 as strongholds, or places de sûreté, for eight years, the expenses of garrisoning them being met by the king.

    The edict also restored Catholicism in all areas where Catholic practice had been interrupted and made any extension of Protestant worship in France legally impossible. Nevertheless, it was much resented by Pope Clement VIII, by the Roman Catholic clergy in France, and by the parlements. Catholics tended to interpret the edict in its most restrictive sense. The Cardinal de Richelieu, who regarded its political and military clauses as a danger to the state, annulled them by the Peace of Alès in 1629. On October 18, 1685, Louis XIV formally revoked the Edict of Nantes and deprived the French Protestants of all religious and civil liberties. Within a few years, more than 400,000 persecuted Huguenots emigrated—to England, Prussia, Holland, and America—depriving France of its most industrious commercial class.

    The Editors of Encyclopaedia Britannica This article was most recently revised and updated by Melissa Petruzzello.

    Source : www.britannica.com

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