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    President Biden Nominates Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson to the United States Supreme Court

    A blog post about the nomination of Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson to the US Supreme Court

    President Biden Nominates Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson to the United States Supreme Court

    February 25, 2022 by Anna Price

    This is a guest post by Jason Zarin, a legal reference specialist at the Law Library of Congress.

    On Friday, February 25, 2022, President Biden nominated federal judge Ketanji Brown Jackson to the United States Supreme Court to replace retiring Justice Stephen G. Breyer.

    Supreme Court Interior, Washington, D.C. Photograph by Carol Highsmith. Law Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division, //hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/highsm.17450.

    Judge Jackson is currently a judge on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit, having been confirmed by the Senate on June 14, 2021. Before her appointment to the U.S. Court of Appeals, she was a judge for the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia. Her previous positions include serving as the vice chair of the U.S. Sentencing Commission (2010-2013), an assistant federal public defender (D.C.) (2005-2007), and an assistant special counsel of the U.S. Sentencing Commission (2003-2005). Prior to these positions, she worked for several members of the federal judiciary. She was a law clerk for the Hon. Stephen G. Breyer, Supreme Court of the U.S. (1999-2000), the Hon. Bruce M. Selya, U.S. Court of Appeals for the First Circuit (1997-1998), and the Hon. Patti B. Saris, U.S. Federal District Court for the District of Massachusetts (1996-1997). In addition to her public service experience, Judge Jackson worked in private practice with Miller Cassidy Larroca & Lewin (1998-1999), Goodwin Procter (2000-2002), The Feinberg Group (2002-2003), and Morrison & Foerster (2007-2010). Judge Brown Jackson is a graduate of Harvard University (BA, JD).

    For more information about Judge Jackson, including books and articles by and about her, court opinions she authored, and other online materials concerning her, please see the Law Library’s United States Supreme Court Nominations research guide. This research guide also has more detailed information and additional resources about the nomination and confirmation process.

    Subscribe to In Custodia Legis – it’s free! – to receive interesting posts drawn from the Law Library of Congress’s vast collections and our staff’s expertise in U.S., foreign, and international law.

    Source : blogs.loc.gov

    Ketanji Brown Jackson to serve on the U.S. Supreme Court

    On April 7, 2022, a bipartisan group of Senators confirmed Judge Jackson's nomination to become the 116th Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court.

    THE SENATE CONFIRMS

    KETANJI BROWN JACKSON

    TO SERVE ON THE U.S. SUPREME COURT

    On February 25, 2022, President Joe Biden nominated Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson to become the 116th Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court.

    On April 7, 2022, a bipartisan group of Senators confirmed Judge Jackson's nomination.

    Since Justice Stephen Breyer announced his retirement, President Biden has conducted a rigorous process to identify his replacement. President Biden sought a candidate with exceptional credentials, unimpeachable character, and unwavering dedication to the rule of law. And the President sought an individual who is committed to equal justice under the law and who understands the profound impact that the Supreme Court’s decisions have on the lives of the American people.

    That is why the President nominated Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson to serve as the next Justice on the Supreme Court. Judge Jackson is one of our nation’s brightest legal minds and has an unusual breadth of experience in our legal system, giving her the perspective to be an exceptional Justice.

    About Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson

    Judge Jackson was born in Washington, DC and grew up in Miami, Florida. Her parents attended segregated primary schools, then attended historically black colleges and universities. Both started their careers as public school teachers and became leaders and administrators in the Miami-Dade Public School System. When Judge Jackson was in preschool, her father attended law school. In a 2017 lecture, Judge Jackson traced her love of the law back to sitting next to her father in their apartment as he tackled his law school homework—reading cases and preparing for Socratic questioning—while she undertook her preschool homework—coloring books.

    Judge Jackson stood out as a high achiever throughout her childhood. She was a speech and debate star who was elected “mayor” of Palmetto Junior High and student body president of Miami Palmetto Senior High School. But like many Black women, Judge Jackson still faced naysayers. When Judge Jackson told her high school guidance counselor she wanted to attend Harvard, the guidance counselor warned that Judge Jackson should not set her “sights so high.”

    That did not stop Judge Jackson. She graduated magna cum laude from Harvard University, then attended Harvard Law School, where she graduated cum laude and was an editor of the Harvard Law Review.

    Judge Jackson lives with her husband, Patrick, and their two daughters, in Washington, DC.

    Experience

    Judge on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit

    Judge on the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia

    Vice Chair of the U.S. Sentencing Commission

    Public defender

    Supreme Court Clerk

    Perspective on the Legal System

    IN THEIR OWN WORDS

    Judge Jackson comes from a law enforcement family, with two uncles who were career law enforcement officers: one was a Miami-Dade County sex crimes detective, and the other rose through the ranks of the City of Miami Police Department to become the Chief of Police. Her brother served as an undercover officer in a drug-sting unit in Baltimore after graduating from college, so she should know quite well the difficulties and dangers our officers face in the line of duty every single day … From our analysis of Judge Jackson’s record and some of her cases, we believe she has considered the facts and applied the law consistently and fairly on a range of issues. There is little doubt that she has the temperament, intellect, legal experience, and family background to have earned this appointment. We are reassured that, should she be confirmed, she would approach her future cases with an open mind and treat issues related to law enforcement fairly and justly. We wish her well as the confirmation process begins.

    Fraternal Order of Police

    Ketanji Brown Jackson is an outstanding jurist and person. Brilliant, fair, and a true and real person. She will be an immense credit to the Court and our country.

    Supreme Court Lawyer Neal Katyal

    Judge Jackson by all accounts possesses the qualities essential in a Supreme Court justice: a devotion to the rule of law; a commitment to judicial independence; an ability and willingness to collaborate with colleagues whose views and philosophies differ from her own. She also appears to be a keen and careful legal thinker. A graduate of Harvard and Harvard Law School, she was an editor of the law review and went on to clerk for Justice Stephen G. Breyer, whom Mr. Biden has chosen her to replace. She put in eight years as a trial judge before ascending to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia in 2021.

    Washington Post Editorial Board

    Many of us and our colleagues have interacted with Judge Jackson and have found her to possess incredible intellect, excellent legal ability, and a commitment to the highest ethical and professional standards. Throughout her career, she has promoted compassion, dignity, and respect for all parties. As demonstrated by her eight years on the United States District Court for the District of Columbia, Judge Jackson is a fair and impartial jurist. She has authored more than 560 judicial decisions, adjudicating her fair share of complex legal questions in ways that have significantly advanced the legal profession and our understanding of principles enshrined in the Constitution. Her decisions are invariably well-reasoned and thoughtful, and she is singularly prepared to assume the role of appellate jurist.

    Source : www.whitehouse.gov

    Ketanji Brown Jackson confirmed to Supreme Court, first Black woman justice

    Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson is President Joe Biden's first Supreme Court nominee. She will replace retiring Justice Stephen Breyer.

    SKIP NAVIGATION POLITICS

    Senate confirms Ketanji Brown Jackson to Supreme Court, making her the first Black woman to serve as a justice

    PUBLISHED THU, APR 7 20222:18 PM EDTUPDATED THU, APR 7 20225:49 PM EDT

    Kevin Breuninger @KEVINWILLIAMB WATCH LIVE KEY POINTS

    The Senate confirmed Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson to the Supreme Court, making her the first Black woman to serve on the top U.S. court.

    The 53-47 final vote tally showed bipartisan support for Jackson, with three Republicans joining all Democrats to elevate the 51-year-old federal judge to a lifetime appointment.

    Jackson is President Joe Biden’s first Supreme Court nominee. She will replace retiring Justice Stephen Breyer, 83, who was confirmed to the bench in 1994.

    WATCH NOW VIDEO01:09

    Senate votes to make Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson the first Black woman ever to serve on Supreme Court

    The Senate on Thursday confirmed Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson to the Supreme Court, making her the 116th justice — and the first Black woman — to serve on the top U.S. court.

    The 53-47 final vote tally showed bipartisan support for Jackson, with three Republicans joining all Democrats to elevate the 51-year-old federal judge to a lifetime appointment on the high court.

    “This is a great moment for Judge Jackson, but it is a greater moment for America as we rise to a more perfect union,” Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., said before the vote.

    Jackson is President Joe Biden’s first Supreme Court nominee. She will replace retiring Justice Stephen Breyer, 83, who was confirmed to the bench in 1994.

    US President Joe Biden and judge Ketanji Brown Jackson watch the Senate vote on her nomination to an an associate justice on the US Supreme Court, from the Roosevelt Room of the White House in Washington, DC on April 7, 2022.

    Mandel Ngan | AFP | Getty Images

    Vice President Kamala Harris, the first Black woman ever to hold that title, presided over the vote to confirm Jackson. Harris appeared to momentarily choke up with emotion as she read out the vote result, which drew a swell of applause and cheering from the Senate floor.

    Jackson will join a court that has grown substantially more conservative following the appointment of three of former President Donald Trump’s nominees. Her addition will maintain the size of the court’s liberal wing, which is outnumbered 6-3 by the conservative bloc.

    WATCH NOW VIDEO02:46

    Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson confirmed to Supreme Court

    Just five women — Sandra Day O’Connor, Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Sonia Sotomayor, Elena Kagan and Amy Coney Barrett — have served on the Supreme Court. Only two Black men, Thurgood Marshall and Clarence Thomas, have ever been appointed to the bench. No Black women have previously sat on the high court.

    “Judge Jackson’s confirmation was a historic moment for our nation,” Biden said in a tweet after the vote. “We’ve taken another step toward making our highest court reflect the diversity of America. She will be an incredible Justice, and I was honored to share this moment with her.”

    Jackson is also set to become the first Supreme Court justice to have served as a public defender. Democrats have touted that experience as more evidence that Jackson will bring fresh perspective to the historically homogeneous court.

    Public defenders are assigned to defend people in criminal cases who may otherwise be unable to hire their own counsel, a constitutional right. Republicans, however, have tried to wield Jackson’s public-defender experience against her by accusing her of sympathizing with the views or actions of some of her past clients, including detainees at the Guantanamo Bay military prison in Cuba.

    Sen. Tom Cotton, R-Ark., was criticized for remarking Tuesday on the Senate floor that while former Justice Robert Jackson “left the Supreme Court to go to Nuremberg and prosecute the case against the Nazis ... this Judge Jackson might have gone there to defend them.”

    Jackson fielded that criticism and others during more than 23 hours of questioning over two grueling days of confirmation hearings in the Senate Judiciary Committee last month.

    Members of the House Congressional Black Caucus speak after the successful confirmation of Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson as the first Black woman ever to serve on the Supreme Court, at the US Capitol in Washington, DC, April 7, 2022.

    Saul Loeb | AFP | Getty Images

    While her qualifications and temperament were rarely questioned, Republicans tore into Jackson’s judicial record, arguing that her rulings show a willingness to legislate from the bench. They also focused intently on her sentencing record in a handful of child-pornography cases, accusing her of doling out light punishments to those offenders.

    Fact-checkers have disputed that characterization, and Democratic committee members pushed back aggressively against the Republicans’ criticisms.

    Source : www.cnbc.com

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