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    which statement best describes the election of 2008? voter turnout was low because neither candidate excited the public. voter turnout was low because the country was prosperous and secure. voter turnout was high because americans wanted to show approval for the government. voter turnout was high because americans knew important decisions had to be made.

    James

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    get which statement best describes the election of 2008? voter turnout was low because neither candidate excited the public. voter turnout was low because the country was prosperous and secure. voter turnout was high because americans wanted to show approval for the government. voter turnout was high because americans knew important decisions had to be made. from EN Bilgi.

    Lesson 2: The Obama Presidency Flashcards

    Study with Quizlet and memorize flashcards terms like What important issues did the United States face during the election of 2008?, Who is Barack Obama?, How was the 2008 election campaign historic? and more.

    Lesson 2: The Obama Presidency

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    What important issues did the United States face during the election of 2008?

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    1. an economic recession

    2. war in Iraq and Afghanistan

    3. unrest and instability in the Middle East

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    Who is Barack Obama?

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    first African American president of the United States who ran for president in 2008 and 2012, grew up in Hawaii, graduated from Columbia and Harvard universities, served as a senator from Illinois

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    Terms in this set (29)

    What important issues did the United States face during the election of 2008?

    1. an economic recession

    2. war in Iraq and Afghanistan

    3. unrest and instability in the Middle East

    Who is Barack Obama?

    first African American president of the United States who ran for president in 2008 and 2012, grew up in Hawaii, graduated from Columbia and Harvard universities, served as a senator from Illinois

    How was the 2008 election campaign historic?

    two leading candidates for the Democrats were a woman and an African American, Obama became the first African American nominee for a majority, Republicans also nominated a female vice president

    Who is Hillary Clinton?

    ran for the Democratic presidential nomination in 2008, served as First Lady during President Bill Clinton's administration, served as senator from New York, became the secretary of state during Obama's administration

    Troubled Asset Relief Program (TARP)

    lent money to troubled banks, extended loans to help save the American automotive industry, plan was supported by President Obama

    American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA)

    created an $800 billion economic investment, funded state governments, supplied funding for roads and bridges, and created tax cuts for many Americans

    Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill

    an oil rig (Deep Horizon) exploded in the Gulf of Mexico, thousands of barrels of oil per day spilled into the ocean, marine life, beaches, marshes, and estuaries were damaged, in response Obama established the Gulf Coast Ecosystem Restoration Task Force

    ARRA Environmental Projects

    green job training, marine habitat restoration, water quality

    Omnibus Public Land Management Act

    land and river protection

    Fuel Emissions Standard

    reductions in air pollution

    Affordable Care Act

    requirement for Americans to buy health insurance, protection for Americans with preexisting condition, tax credits for small businesses that insure employees

    Supreme Court and Affordable Care Act

    requiring people to buy health insurance was found to be an acceptable use of power to tax so this was upheld, but other parts of the act were overturned

    Foreign Policy Challenges in North Korea

    North Korea began nuclear testing and development, broke an agreement with the United States and continued to test

    Foreign Policy Challenges in Iran

    Iran began nuclear testing and experienced new sanctions

    Foreign Policy Challenges in Cuba

    Obama eased restriction on communication, travel, and exports, United States continued support democracy

    Foreign Policy Challenges in Mexico

    United States created programs to help fight violence on the US-Mexico border

    Foreign Policy Challenges in Iraq

    United States withdrew most troops by the end of 2011

    Foreign Policy Challenges in Afghanistan

    at first, United States sent more troops to combat terrorist groups, began training Afghan forces with the goal of withdrawing

    Osama bin Laden and al-Qaeda

    Osama bin Laden had planned numerous terrorist attacks against the United States, May 1, 2011- US forces killed bin Laden in Pakistan which caused more difficult US-Pakistan relations, drone attacks continued to target al-Qaeda members and supporters

    In 2012, the Supreme Court ruled that requiring people to buy health insurance is

    a. an abuse of government power.

    b. an invasion of individual privacy.

    c. an acceptable use of the commerce clause.

    d. an acceptable use of the power to tax.

    D) an acceptable use of the power to tax.

    The Troubled Asset Relief Program (TARP) worked to

    a. help Americans who had lost their homes.

    b. help small businesses get low-interest loans.

    c. save factory jobs in high-unemployment areas.

    d. save failing banks and the automotive industry.

    D) save failing banks and the automotive industry.

    During the Obama administration, Hillary Clinton served as

    a. secretary of state.

    b. vice president.

    c. a senator from New York.

    d. first lady.

    A) secretary of state.

    In 2010, Congress passed a major plan to reform

    a. the Pentagon.

    b. campaign spending.

    c. health care.

    d. the Supreme Court.

    C) health care.

    The outcome of the presidential election in 2008 was historic because the United States elected

    a. a former first lady.

    b. an African American.

    c. a former congressperson.

    d. an Asian American.

    B) an African American.

    The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act failed to

    a. help American taxpayers.

    b. halt rising unemployment.

    Source : quizlet.com

    Frequently Asked Questions

    The Electoral College website now has an easy-to-remember address. Make sure to update your bookmarks! Click the links below for answers to these frequently asked questions. Who verifies if a candidate is qualified to run for President? What happens if the President-elect fails to qualify before inauguration? What happens if a candidate with electoral votes dies or becomes

    Frequently Asked Questions

    The Electoral College website now has an easy-to-remember address.  Make sure to update your bookmarks!

    Click the links below for answers to these frequently asked questions.

    Who verifies if a candidate is qualified to run for President?

    What happens if the President-elect fails to qualify before inauguration?

    What happens if a candidate with electoral votes dies or becomes incapacitated after the general election?

    What happens if the States don’t submit their Certificates in time because of a recount?

    How is it possible for the electoral vote to produce a different result than the national popular vote?

    Can my State vote for the winner of the national popular vote instead of my State’s winner?

    What happens if no presidential candidate gets 270 electoral votes?

    What would happen if two candidates tied in a state’s popular vote, or if there was a dispute as to the winner?

    What impact does a candidate’s concession speech have on the Electoral College process?

    Can electoral votes be contested when Congress counts the votes in January?

    I am serving overseas in the U.S. military. How do I cast my vote in this year’s Presidential election?

    Can citizens of U.S. Territories vote for President?

    How can I learn more about the Electoral College?

    Who verifies if a candidate is qualified to run for President?

    The OFR at the NARA administers the Electoral College process, which takes place after the November general election. The OFR does not have the authority to handle issues related to the general election, such as candidate qualifications. People interested in this issue may wish to contact their state election officials or their Congressional Representatives.

    Because the process of qualifying for the election and having a candidate’s name put on the ballot varies from state to state, you should contact your state’s top election officer for more information. In most states, the Secretary of State is the official responsible for oversight of state elections, including the presidential election. Visit the National Secretaries of State website to locate contact information and web addresses for the Secretary of State from each state and the District of Columbia.

    What happens if the President-elect fails to qualify before inauguration?

    If the President-elect fails to qualify before inauguration, Section 3 of the 20th Amendment states that the Vice President-elect will act as President until such a time as a President has qualified.

    In the unlikely occurrence that both the President-elect and Vice President-elect fail to qualify by the beginning of the presidential term, Congress established an order of succession in 3 U.S.C. Sec. 19.

    What happens if a candidate dies or becomes incapacitated?

    There is no Federally-required process to follow if a candidate who is projected to receive electoral votes dies or becomes incapacitated between the general election and the meeting of electors. However,  individual States may have their own requirements that govern how electors must vote at the meeting of the electors. In 1872, when Horace Greeley passed away between Election Day and the meeting of electors, the electors who were slated to vote for Greeley voted for various candidates, including Greeley. The votes cast for Greeley were not counted due to a House resolution passed regarding the matter. See the full Electoral College vote counts for President and Vice President in the 1872 election.

    We don’t know what would happen if a candidate who, after dies or becomes incapacitated between the meeting of electors and the counting of electoral votes in Congress.

    The Constitution is silent on whether this candidate meets the definition of “President elect” or “Vice President elect.” If the candidate with a majority of the electoral votes is considered “President elect,” even before the counting of electoral votes in Congress, Section 3 of the 20th Amendment applies. Section 3 of the 20th Amendment states that the Vice President elect will become President if the President elect dies or becomes incapacitated.

    If a winning Presidential candidate dies or becomes incapacitated between the counting of electoral votes in the Congress and the inauguration, the Vice President elect will become President, according to Section 3 of the 20th Amendment.

    What happens if the States don’t submit their Certificates in time because of a recount?

    Title 3 of the United States Code establishes procedures for the Electoral College process and requires that States settle any controversies regarding their electors at least 6 calendar days before the meeting of the electors. It is up to Congress to determine what to do in the event one or more States cannot meet the statutory deadlines. However, the Constitution does not require that States appoint electors based on the popular vote, so a State may be able to resolve the controversy under State law, appoint electors, and issue a Certificate even if a recount is pending.

    Even if a State is unable to resolve a controversy by the statutory deadline, nothing prevents the State from appointing electors.

    Resolving controversies before the statutory deadline eliminates the potential for one type of challenge during the counting of the votes in Congress.  However, missing the deadline doesn’t guarantee a challenge. See 3 U.S.C. section 15.

    Source : www.archives.gov

    Barack Obama: Campaigns and Elections

    Barack Obama: Campaigns and Elections

    Barack Obama: Campaigns and Elections BARACK OBAMA: CAMPAIGNS AND ELECTIONS

    Obama’s election to the Senate instantly made him the highest-ranking African American officeholder in the country and, along with the excitement generated by his convention speech and his books (Dreams from my Father, brought back into print, joined The Audacity of Hope on the bestseller list), placed him high on the roster of prospective Democratic presidential candidates in 2008. After spending a low-profile first year in office focusing on solidifying his base in Illinois and traveling abroad to buttress his foreign policy credentials as a member of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, Obama spent much of 2006 speaking to audiences around the country and mulling whether to run for president. According to annual National Journal evaluations of senators' legislative voting records, Obama ranked as the first, tenth, or sixteenth most liberal member of the Senate, depending on the year.

    Obama announced his presidential candidacy on February 10, 2007, at a rally in front of the Old State House in Springfield, Illinois, where Abraham Lincoln had given his famous “house divided” speech in 1858. Relying heavily on the Internet, the Obama campaign mobilized Obama for America (OFA), a massive grassroots organization of volunteers and donors. (After he was elected, OFA was recast as Organizing for America for the purpose of rousing public support for Obama’s legislative initiatives.) With Axelrod again at the helm, the campaign developed a strategy for winning the Democratic nomination that relied on assembling the same coalition of blacks and white liberals that had enabled him to succeed in Illinois, with an additional focus on young voters. Initially, however, Senator Hillary Rodham Clinton opened a strong lead in the polls, even among African American voters and leaders who admired her and her husband, former President Bill Clinton, and did not think Obama had much of a chance to win. Former Senator John Edwards, the Democrats’ vice presidential nominee in 2004, was also widely regarded at the start of the campaign as a stronger candidate than the inexperienced Obama.

    Drawing on his online base of supporters, Obama initially surprised political pundits by matching Clinton and besting Edwards in campaign fundraising throughout 2007. He became the co-frontrunner in the race by winning the crucial Iowa caucuses on January 3, 2008, defeating both Edwards and Clinton by an 8-percentage point margin. Clinton rebounded to win the New Hampshire primary five days later, edging out Obama by 3 points and crushing Edwards by 22 points. In the next important test, Obama opened up a narrow lead in the nomination contest by defeating Clinton handily in the South Carolina primary, 55 percent to 27 percent, on January 26. Black voters, convinced by the Iowa results that whites would vote for an African American candidate for president, gave him overwhelming support in South Carolina and in subsequent primaries. Edwards finished a distant third in the state where he was born and dropped out of the race on January 30. Other contenders for the nomination, including Senator Christopher Dodd of Connecticut, Senator Joseph Biden of Delaware, and Governor Bill Richardson of New Mexico, had already dropped out because of their poor showings in the initial round of primaries and caucuses.

    From February through early June, Obama and Clinton battled fiercely through the remaining primaries and caucuses. Overall, Clinton won twenty primaries to Obama’s nineteen, including victories in most of the large states, notably California, Texas, New York, New Jersey, Ohio, and Pennsylvania. Both candidates were bidding to become historic “firsts”—the first African American president or the first woman president.

    But Obama had three crucial advantages that enabled him to eke out a narrow victory for the Democratic nomination. First, he was able to contrast his consistent opposition to the war in Iraq with Clinton’s vote in 2002 to authorize the war before later turning against it. Second, although there was little difference between Clinton and Obama on the issues, Obama ran on a theme of change and Clinton on a theme of experience. In a year when the economy was steadily deteriorating, change was the more appealing theme, especially among Democratic voters. Third, while fighting Clinton in the thirty-nine primaries, Obama did not overlook the seventeen states and territories that, like Iowa, choose their national convention delegates through caucuses. He strongly out-organized Clinton in those contests, winning fourteen of seventeen caucuses. The delegates Obama won in the caucuses put him over the top. Clinton withdrew from the nominating contest on June 7, 2008.

    As hard-fought as his victory was, Obama faced only one serious crisis during the entire nomination campaign. In early March, news organizations and websites showed video recordings of some controversial sermons by Obama’s pastor, Reverend Jeremiah Wright, including one in which Wright blamed the United States for the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks on New York City and Washington and another in which he accused the federal government of “inventing the HIV virus as a means of genocide against people of color.” Obama largely defused the crisis by giving a speech in Philadelphia on March 18, 2008, repudiating Wright's statements and thoughtfully outlining his own views on race relations. But he faced continuing difficulties winning white working class votes against Clinton in the primaries, and some doubted that he could win their support in the general election against the Republican nominee, Senator John McCain of Arizona.

    Source : millercenter.org

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