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    which stage of the hero’s journey is represented in this passage?

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    English B Odyssey, an introduction Flashcards

    Start studying English B Odyssey, an introduction. Learn vocabulary, terms, and more with flashcards, games, and other study tools.

    English B Odyssey, an introduction

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    Read the excerpt from The Odyssey.

    He saw the townlands

    and learned the minds of many distant men,

    and weathered many bitter nights and days

    in his deep heart at sea, while he fought only

    to save his life, to bring his shipmates home.

    But not by will nor valor could he save them,

    for their own recklessness destroyed them all—

    children and fools, they killed and feasted on

    the cattle of Lord Helios, the Sun,

    and he who moves all day through heaven

    took from their eyes the dawn of their return.

    Of these adventures, Muse, daughter of Zeus,

    tell us in our time, lift the great song again.

    What can be learned about the ancient Greeks from this excerpt? Check all that apply.

    Click card to see definition 👆

    They valued perseverance, bravery, and strength.

    They believed the gods were active in people's lives.

    Click again to see term 👆

    Read the excerpt from The Odyssey.

    This was an army, trained to fight on horseback

    or, where the ground required, on foot. They came

    with dawn over that terrain like the leaves

    and blades of spring. So doom appeared to us,

    dark word of Zeus for us, our evil days.

    My men stood up and made a fight of it—

    backed on the ships, with lances kept in play,

    from bright morning through the blaze of noon

    so holding our beach, although so far outnumbered;

    but when the sun passed toward unyoking time,

    then the Achaeans, one by one, gave way.

    Which stage of the hero's journey is represented in this passage?

    Click card to see definition 👆

    The road of trials

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    Terms in this set (7)

    Read the excerpt from The Odyssey.

    He saw the townlands

    and learned the minds of many distant men,

    and weathered many bitter nights and days

    in his deep heart at sea, while he fought only

    to save his life, to bring his shipmates home.

    But not by will nor valor could he save them,

    for their own recklessness destroyed them all—

    children and fools, they killed and feasted on

    the cattle of Lord Helios, the Sun,

    and he who moves all day through heaven

    took from their eyes the dawn of their return.

    Of these adventures, Muse, daughter of Zeus,

    tell us in our time, lift the great song again.

    What can be learned about the ancient Greeks from this excerpt? Check all that apply.

    They valued perseverance, bravery, and strength.

    They believed the gods were active in people's lives.

    Read the excerpt from The Odyssey.

    This was an army, trained to fight on horseback

    or, where the ground required, on foot. They came

    with dawn over that terrain like the leaves

    and blades of spring. So doom appeared to us,

    dark word of Zeus for us, our evil days.

    My men stood up and made a fight of it—

    backed on the ships, with lances kept in play,

    from bright morning through the blaze of noon

    so holding our beach, although so far outnumbered;

    but when the sun passed toward unyoking time,

    then the Achaeans, one by one, gave way.

    Which stage of the hero's journey is represented in this passage?

    The road of trials

    Based on this passage of The Odyssey, one can conclude that the ancient Greeks greatly valued

    Bravery

    Read the excerpt from The Odyssey.

    "I am Laertes' son, Odysseus.

    Men hold me

    formidable for guile in peace and war:

    this fame has gone abroad to the sky's rim.

    Which is the best paraphrase of this excerpt?

    Odysseus is the son of Laertes and is widely respected for his cunning.

    Read the excerpt from The Odyssey.

    My home is on the peaked sea-mark of Ithaca

    under Mount Neion's wind-blown robe of leaves,

    in sight of other islands—Dulichium,

    Same, wooded Zacynthus—Ithaca

    being most lofty in that coastal sea,

    and northwest, while the rest lie east and south.

    A rocky isle, but good for a boy's training;

    I shall not see on earth a place more dear,

    Read a student's paraphrase of the excerpt.

    Odysseus's home is Ithaca, a rocky island surrounded by other islands. Odysseus considers Ithaca a great place in which to grow up.

    What key detail should be added to strengthen the student's paraphrasing of this excerpt?

    Odysseus holds his home very close to his heart.

    Read the excerpt from The Odyssey.

    Then I sent out two picked men and a runner

    to learn what race of men that land sustained.

    They fell in, soon enough, with Lotus-Eaters,

    who showed no will to do us harm, only

    offering the sweet Lotus to our friends—

    but those who ate this honeyed plant, the Lotus,

    never cared to report, nor to return:

    they longed to stay forever, browsing on

    that native bloom, forgetful of their homeland.

    Which central idea should be included in a paraphrase of this excerpt?

    The men sent by Odysseus to investigate the land they had landed upon became forgetful after eating Lotus plants.

    Read the excerpt from The Odyssey.

    My men stood up and made a fight of it—

    backed on the ships, with lances kept in play,

    Source : quizlet.com

    The Hero’s Journey: Examples of Each Stage

    Reviewing hero’s journey examples can simplify this concept and aid in understanding. Explore each step of the journey and clear examples.

    The Hero’s Journey: Examples of Each Stage

    Mythology can be simultaneously fascinating and complex. Intrigued by these legendary tales, author Joseph Campbell studied myths and made the famous claim that nearly all myths and some other story types have similar ideas, and the heroes' adventures are almost identical in their format. The different stages of adventure he identified have come to be called the hero's journey. Explore the stages of a hero's journey and hero's journey examples.

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    Stages of the Hero's Journey

    There are multiple steps to the hero's journey, and each step falls into one of three stages.

    Stage 1: Departure - During this stage, the hero is preparing for his quest.Stage 2: Initiation - This begins as the hero crosses the first threshold, and it ends as the hero begins the road back.Stage 3: Return - This starts as the hero begins the road back, this stage continues through the end of the story.

    Joseph Campbell's Hero's Journey Steps

    In his book, The Hero with a Thousand Faces, Joesph Campbell broke down the 17 steps of the hero's journey.

    Call to Adventure -A problem or threat interrupts the hero's normal life.Refusal of the Call - Initially, the hero is hesitant to embark on the journey. Therefore, they refuse the call.Supernatural Aid - Someone they look up to helps them find the inspiration to join the journey.Crossing the Threshold - This is the point where the hero leaves on their journey.Belly of the Whale - In this stage, the hero encounters the first obstacle after leaving on the journey. This step is the end of the departure stage.Road of Trials - The first step of the initiation stage, these are the trials the hero undergoes and the beginning of the change in some aspect of the hero. They learn from their mistakes in this step.Meeting With the Goddess - The hero meets the allies that will help them through their journey.Woman as Temptress - The temptation that arises to try to get the hero to abandon the journey.Atonement With the Father - One of the major turning points of the story where the hero faces the ultimate reason for the journey. The hero might face a villain or even their own doubt.Apotheosis - From the previous step, the hero learns how they will face the rest of the journey. This is the moment that the hero gains profound understanding or knowledge that helps them to prevail.Ultimate Boon - The final step of the initiation stage, this step is where the hero fulfills the reason for their journey.Refusal of Return - The first step of the return stage, the hero is initially reluctant to return to their mundane life.Magic Flight - Though the hero has answered their call and completed the reason for their journey, they are still chased by others. In this step, the hero works to evade those chasing them.Rescue From Without - Again an outside source or mentor works to guide them home and rescue them from those chasing them.Crossing the Return Threshold - The hero crosses back into their mundane world.Master of Two Worlds - Since the hero has been on the journey, they need to learn to balance their mundane life and the world they experienced on the journey.Freedom to Live - The hero acclimates back into their mundane life and lives peacefully.

    Christopher Vogler's 12 Step Hero's Journey

    In his book, The Writer's Journey, Christopher Vogler, a Hollywood consultant, simplified Joseph Campbell's hero's journey into only 12 steps. The 12 steps of the hero's journey include:

    Ordinary World - This step refers to the hero's normal life at the start of the story, before the adventure begins. It’s the starting point, and it gives a glimpse into the character of the hero before the adventure begins. Often, this hero will change over the course of the story. We may see evidence of hamartia or a fatal flaw in the hero at this early point in the story.Call to Adventure - The hero is faced with something that makes them begin their adventure. This might be a problem or a challenge they need to overcome. In general, the hero must make a choice about whether to undertake the adventure.Refusal of the Call - The hero attempts to refuse the adventure because of fear. They may feel unprepared or inadequate, or may not want to sacrifice what is being asked of them.Meeting With the Mentor - The hero encounters someone who can give advice and ready them for the journey ahead. Acting as a mentor, this person imparts wisdom that may change the hero’s mind.Crossing the First Threshold - The hero leaves their ordinary world for the first time and crosses the threshold into adventure. This step may seem almost inevitable, but it also represents a choice the hero is making. It’s a door through which the hero must pass for the story to really begin.Tests, Allies, Enemies - The hero learns the rules of their new world. During this time, they endure tests of strength and tests of will, meets friends, and come face to face with foes. This period in the journey helps define the hero's relationship with other characters in the story. During this part of the journey, the hero learns who will help and who will hinder.

    Source : examples.yourdictionary.com

    Spiritual Formation as the Hero’s Journey in John of Ruusbroec

    This book examines the theology of spiritual formation developed by fourteenth-century Flemish mystic John of Ruusbroec, arguing that his formational path clearly and consistently displays the characteristics of the archetypal narrative structure of the hero’s journey. To start with, a hermeneutical dialogue between scholars of the hero’s journey and Ruusbroec is established, employing the work of Hans-Georg Gadamer. The author then examines the stages and tropes of the hero’s journey according to Vladimir Propp, Joseph Campbell, Northrop Frye, René Girard, Dean Miller, and others, exploring the parallels in Ruusbroec’s writing and theology of spiritual formation. The book follows Ruusbroec’s story of answering the divine call, journeying inward and experiencing the trials of spiritual transformation, attaining the treasure of divine union, and returning in loving service to others. Finally, the ramifications of the argument for the interpretation and application of other mystical and heroic narratives are considered. Offering a new perspective on John of Ruusbroec, mystical theology, and the hero’s journey as a spiritual quest, this volume will be of interest to scholars of mysticism, theology, formative spirituality, narrative theory, and religious literature of the Low Countries.

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    Spiritual Formation as the Hero’s Journey in John of Ruusbroec

    Robert Pelfrey

    Routledge, 7 Nis 2022 - 222 sayfa

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    This book examines the theology of spiritual formation developed by fourteenth-century Flemish mystic John of Ruusbroec, arguing that his formational path clearly and consistently displays the characteristics of the archetypal narrative structure of the hero’s journey.

    To start with, a hermeneutical dialogue between scholars of the hero’s journey and Ruusbroec is established, employing the work of Hans-Georg Gadamer. The author then examines the stages and tropes of the hero’s journey according to Vladimir Propp, Joseph Campbell, Northrop Frye, René Girard, Dean Miller, and others, exploring the parallels in Ruusbroec’s writing and theology of spiritual formation. The book follows Ruusbroec’s story of answering the divine call, journeying inward and experiencing the trials of spiritual transformation, attaining the treasure of divine union, and returning in loving service to others. Finally, the ramifications of the argument for the interpretation and application of other mystical and heroic narratives are considered.

    Offering a new perspective on John of Ruusbroec, mystical theology, and the hero’s journey as a spiritual quest, this volume will be of interest to scholars of mysticism, theology, formative spirituality, narrative theory, and religious literature of the Low Countries.

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    List of illustrations

    Call departure and the active life

    e inner life and the road of trials

    Union as the object of sear and Apotheosis

    Villainy and the struggle of the return

    e common life in two kingdoms

    Glossary of Middle Dutch terms

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    according active aracter aracteristics aretypal hero’s becomes beginning Bridegroom Brulocht calls Campbell Campbell’s Christ Christian Chur coming common complete considered contemplative continues created creatures darkness describes desire difference divine Edited enlightened especially Espousals essence essential eternal example experience explains faculties Father final flowing Frye function Gerard gis God’s grace ground heart hero hero’s journey heroic Holy Spirit human initial inner intermediary interpretation Introduction John kingdom light literary living means medieval meeting mode Mommaers Morphology movement moving mystic-hero mystical myth narrative nature Nevertheless Nieuwenhove notes object offers origin path perfection person present Press Propp Realm reason resear reshold rest result Return Ruusbroec says seen soul spiritual formation stage Stone story structure supernatural teaing theology things Translated trials Trinity true turn ultimate understanding union unity University virtues writing

    Yazar hakkında (2022)

    Robert Pelfrey is a graduate of the University of Manchester and a fellow of the Manchester Wesley Research Centre at Nazarene Theological College, where he has lectured in the History of Christianity. He is also a Methodist pastor in the United States. His research interests include spiritual formation, late medieval mystical theology, theology in arts and culture, heroism studies, and Wesleyan-Methodist history and theology. He writes on Christian formation and spirituality for both academic and general readerships.

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