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    which sentence from american indian civil rights” best describes the conflict the author develops in the text? most experts agree that is was over ten thousand years ago, well before european settlers began exploring this region of the world. relationships between the europeans and american indians turned hostile, and rights were one by one stripped away from american indians. one of the most sweeping blows to the american indian community occurred in 1830 when president andrew jackson signed the indian removal act. over the years, american indian activists have valiantly fought for reform and for the government to honor certain treaty obligations.

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    get which sentence from american indian civil rights” best describes the conflict the author develops in the text? most experts agree that is was over ten thousand years ago, well before european settlers began exploring this region of the world. relationships between the europeans and american indians turned hostile, and rights were one by one stripped away from american indians. one of the most sweeping blows to the american indian community occurred in 1830 when president andrew jackson signed the indian removal act. over the years, american indian activists have valiantly fought for reform and for the government to honor certain treaty obligations. from EN Bilgi.

    Fighting for Equality Unit Test 100% Flashcards

    Study with Quizlet and memorize flashcards terms like Read the excerpt from President Kennedy's Report to the American People. It ought to be possible, therefore, for American students of any color to attend any public institution they select without having to be backed up by troops. It ought to be possible for American consumers of any color to receive equal service in places of public accommodation, such as hotels and restaurants and theaters and retail stores, without being forced to resort to demonstrations in the street, and it ought to be possible for American citizens of any color to register and to vote in a free election without interference or fear of reprisal. It ought to be possible, in short, for every American to enjoy the privileges of being American without regard to his race or his color. In short, every American ought to have the right to be treated as he would wish to be treated, as one would wish his children to be treated. In the excerpt, President Kennedy emphasizes his point most by using, Which sentence from "American Indian Civil Rights" best describes the conflict the author develops in the text?, Read the excerpt from "American Indian Civil Rights." One of the most sweeping blows to the American Indian community occurred in 1830 when President Andrew Jackson signed the Indian Removal Act. As a result, the government negotiated with tribes to move them to land west of the Mississippi River. The government then acquired their previously inhabited land. Some tribes reluctantly went along with the act. However, many did not want to abandon their homelands. In this excerpt, the setting and more.

    Fighting for Equality Unit Test 100%

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    Read the excerpt from President Kennedy's Report to the American People.

    It ought to be possible, therefore, for American students of any color to attend any public institution they select without having to be backed up by troops. It ought to be possible for American consumers of any color to receive equal service in places of public accommodation, such as hotels and restaurants and theaters and retail stores, without being forced to resort to demonstrations in the street, and it ought to be possible for American citizens of any color to register and to vote in a free election without interference or fear of reprisal. It ought to be possible, in short, for every American to enjoy the privileges of being American without regard to his race or his color. In short, every American ought to have the right to be treated as he would wish to be treated, as one would wish his children to be treated.

    In the excerpt, President Kennedy emphasizes his point most by using

    Click card to see definition 👆

    anaphora to emphasize the lack of equality.

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    Which sentence from "American Indian Civil Rights" best describes the conflict the author develops in the text?

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    Relationships between the Europeans and American Indians turned hostile, and rights were one by one stripped away from American Indians.

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    Terms in this set (25)

    Read the excerpt from President Kennedy's Report to the American People.

    It ought to be possible, therefore, for American students of any color to attend any public institution they select without having to be backed up by troops. It ought to be possible for American consumers of any color to receive equal service in places of public accommodation, such as hotels and restaurants and theaters and retail stores, without being forced to resort to demonstrations in the street, and it ought to be possible for American citizens of any color to register and to vote in a free election without interference or fear of reprisal. It ought to be possible, in short, for every American to enjoy the privileges of being American without regard to his race or his color. In short, every American ought to have the right to be treated as he would wish to be treated, as one would wish his children to be treated.

    In the excerpt, President Kennedy emphasizes his point most by using

    anaphora to emphasize the lack of equality.

    Which sentence from "American Indian Civil Rights" best describes the conflict the author develops in the text?

    Relationships between the Europeans and American Indians turned hostile, and rights were one by one stripped away from American Indians.

    Read the excerpt from "American Indian Civil Rights."

    One of the most sweeping blows to the American Indian community occurred in 1830 when President Andrew Jackson signed the Indian Removal Act. As a result, the government negotiated with tribes to move them to land west of the Mississippi River. The government then acquired their previously inhabited land. Some tribes reluctantly went along with the act. However, many did not want to abandon their homelands.

    In this excerpt, the setting

    fuels the external conflict.

    Read the excerpt from "American Indian Civil Rights."

    Over the years, American Indian activists have valiantly fought for reform and for the government to honor certain treaty obligations. Sarah Winnemucca, a member of the Northern Paiutes tribe, campaigned for better living conditions for her tribe in the late 1800s. She lectured around the country in an effort to increase support for her cause. Physician and lecturer Charles Eastman, who was part of the Sioux tribe, also strove to improve the circumstances of American Indians in the early 1900s through public speaking and serving in organizations such as the Society of American Indians.

    What is the best reason to conclude that the author wants the reader to admire American Indians?

    The author uses words, such as "valiantly," that have strong emotional connotations of courage and respect.

    Read the excerpt from "My First March."

    A group in the back started fanning themselves and singing the song "Heatwave," making everyone laugh and sing along.

    The author conveys the joy in the excerpt through the use of

    an allusion

    Read the excerpt from My Story.

    She took me up a flight of stairs (the cells were on the second level), through a door covered with iron mesh, and along a dimly lighted corridor. She placed me in an empty dark cell and slammed the door closed. She walked a few steps away, but then she turned around and came back. She said, "There are two girls around the other side, and if you want to go over there with them instead of being in a cell by yourself, I will take you over there." I told her that it didn't matter, but she said, "Let's go around there, and then you won't have to be in a cell alone." It was her way of being nice. It didn't make me feel any better.

    How does Rosa Parks help the reader understand her emotions in this excerpt?

    by describing in detail the order of what happened to her

    Read the excerpt from "American Indian Civil Rights."

    One of the most sweeping blows to the American Indian community occurred in 1830 when President Andrew Jackson signed the Indian Removal Act. As a result, the government negotiated with tribes to move them to land west of the Mississippi River. The government then acquired their previously inhabited land. Some tribes reluctantly went along with the act.

    Source : quizlet.com

    American Indian Movement

    American Indian Movement, (AIM), militant American Indian civil rights organization, founded in Minneapolis, Minnesota, in 1968 by Dennis Banks, Clyde Bellecourt, Eddie Benton Banai, and George Mitchell. Later, Russell Means became a prominent spokesman for the group. Its original purpose was to help Indians in urban ghettos who had been displaced by government programs that had the effect of forcing them from the reservations. Its goals eventually encompassed the entire spectrum of Indian demands—economic independence, revitalization of traditional culture, protection of legal rights, and, most especially, autonomy over tribal areas and the restoration of lands that they believed had been

    American Indian Movement

    American civil rights organization

    Alternate titles: AIM

    By The Editors of Encyclopaedia Britannica • Edit History

    Date: 1968 - present

    Areas Of Involvement: social movement civil rights

    Related People: Buffy Sainte-Marie Mary Crow Dog

    See all related content →

    American Indian Movement, (AIM), militant American Indian civil rights organization, founded in Minneapolis, Minnesota, in 1968 by Dennis Banks, Clyde Bellecourt, Eddie Benton Banai, and George Mitchell. Later, Russell Means became a prominent spokesman for the group. Its original purpose was to help Indians in urban ghettos who had been displaced by government programs that had the effect of forcing them from the reservations. Its goals eventually encompassed the entire spectrum of Indian demands—economic independence, revitalization of traditional culture, protection of legal rights, and, most especially, autonomy over tribal areas and the restoration of lands that they believed had been illegally seized.

    AIM was involved in many highly publicized protests. It was one of the Indian groups involved in the occupation (1969–71) of Alcatraz Island, the march (1972) on Washington, D.C., to protest violation of treaties (in which AIM members occupied the office of the Bureau of Indian Affairs), and the takeover (1973) of a site at Wounded Knee to protest the government’s Indian policy. In the mid-1970s AIM’s efforts were centred on the prevention of resource exploitation of Indian lands by the federal government. With many of its leaders in prison, and torn by internal dissension, the national leadership disbanded in 1978, although local groups continued to function. From 1981 an AIM group occupied part of the Black Hills (South Dakota) to press its demands for return of the area to Indian jurisdiction.

    This article was most recently revised and updated by Adam Augustyn.

    Source : www.britannica.com

    The Battle of Horseshoe Bend: Collision of Cultures (Teaching with Historic Places) (U.S. National Park Service)

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    ARTICLE

    The Battle of Horseshoe Bend: Collision of Cultures (Teaching with Historic Places)

    Horseshoe Bend National Military Park

    Today the Tallapoosa River quietly winds its way through east-central Alabama, its banks edged by the remnants of the forest that once covered the Southeast. About halfway down its 270-mile run to the southwest, the river curls back on itself to form a peninsula. The land defined by this "horseshoe bend" covers about 100 wooded acres; a finger of high ground points down its center, and an island stands sentinel on its west side.

    This tranquil setting belies the violence that cut through Horseshoe Bend on March 27, 1814. On the peninsula stood 1,000 American Indian warriors, members of the tribe European Americans knew as the Creek. These men, along with 350 women and children, had arrived over the previous six months in search of refuge. Many had been part of a series of costly battles during the past year, all fought in an attempt to regain the autonomy the Indians had held before the arrival of European Americans. Surrounding the Creek were forces led by future President Andrew Jackson, then a major general of the Tennessee Militia. The core of his force was 2,600 European American soldiers, most of whom hoped that a victory would open native land to European American settlement. Yet this fight was not simply European American versus American Indian: on Jackson's side were 600 "friendly" Indians, including 100 Creek.

    The Battle of Horseshoe Bend, as the events of March 27 became known, illustrated three long-running conflicts in American history. It was yet another fight between European Americans and American Indians, in this case the decisive battle in the Creek War (1813- 1814). That day and those leading up to it also provided an example of tensions among American Indians, even those in the same tribe. Finally, both Creek factions received supportfrom white governments, thereby continuing the long tradition of European nations attempting to defeat their rivals by enlisting the native population.

    About This Lesson

    This lesson is based on the National Register of Historic Places registration file "Horseshoe Bend Battlefield" (with photographs), documents from archives at Horseshoe Bend National Military Park, and other resources. This lesson was written by Virginia Horak, Public Affairs Specialist, Interagency Archeological Services Division of the National Park Service. It was edited by Teaching with Historic Places staff. This lesson is one in a series that brings the important stories of historic places into classrooms across the country.

    Where it fits into the curriculum

    Time Period: Late 18th century to mid-19th century

    Topics: This lesson could be used in units on American Indian culture, early 19th-century westward expansion, the War of 1812, European American and American Indian relations, and the Jacksonian Era.

    United States History Standards for Grades 5-12

    The Battle of Horseshoe Bend: Collision of Cultures

    relates to the following National Standards for History:

    Era 2: Colonization and Settlement (1585-1763)

    Standard 1B: The student understands the European struggle for control of North America.

    Era 4: Expansion and Reform (1801-1861)

    Standard 1A: The student understands the international background and consequences of the Louisiana Purchase, the War of 1812, and the Monroe Doctrine.

    Standard 1B: The student understands federal and state Indian policy and the strategies for survival forged by Native Americans.

    Curriculum Standards for Social Studies

    National Council for the Social Studies

    The Battle of Horseshoe Bend: Collision of Cultures

    relates to the following Social Studies Standards:

    Theme I: Culture

    Standard B: The student explains how information and experiences may be interpreted by people from diverse cultural perspectives and frames of reference.

    Standard E: The student articulates the implications of cultural diversity, as well as cohesion, within and across groups.

    Theme II: Time, Continuity and Change

    Standard C: The student identifies and describes selected historical periods and patterns of change within and across cultures, such as the rise of civilizations, the development of transportation systems, the growth and breakdown of colonial systems, and others.

    Standard D: The student identifies and uses processes important to reconstructing and reinterpreting the past, such as using a variety of sources, providing, validating, and weighing evidence for claims, checking credibility of sources, and searching for causality.

    Standard E: The student develops critical sensitivities such as empathy and skepticism regarding attitudes, values, and behaviors of people in different historical contexts.

    Standard F: The student uses knowledge of facts and concepts drawn from history, along with methods of historical inquiry, to inform decision-making about and action-taking on public issues

    Theme III: People, Places, and Environment

    Source : www.nps.gov

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