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    which of the following is a minority ethnic group in several countries despite occupying a large area of the region?

    James

    Guys, does anyone know the answer?

    get which of the following is a minority ethnic group in several countries despite occupying a large area of the region? from EN Bilgi.

    Which of the following is a minority ethnic group in several countries despite occupying a

    Which of the following is a minority ethnic group in several countries despite occupying a large area of the region?

    Questions

    social studies

    Which of the following is a minority ethnic group in several countries despite occupying a large area of the region?

    👍 👎 👁 🚩

    hello

    Jan 31, 2022 What following? 👍 👎 🚩

    Anon

    Jan 31, 2022 The answers are 1. Kurds

    2. women pursuing careers outside their homes

    3. in Southwest Asia are _muslims_

    in Cyprus however are _christian_

    in Israel are _jewish_

    4. christians, sunni muslims, shiite muslims

    5. oil

    just took it and got 100% :)

    👍 👎 🚩

    bruh

    Feb 1, 2022

    Bruh is 100% right, this is for the cultural diversity quick check part.

    👍 👎 🚩

    Nice

    Feb 2, 2022

    connexus answers >:)

    1. C 2. B

    3. muslim, christian, jewish. (in that order i listed them in)

    4. B,C,E 5. oil

    if I'm wrong I owe you a penny >:3

    👍 👎 🚩

    trans.boi.oliver

    Feb 9, 2022

    trans.boi.oliver is 100% correct

    👍 👎 🚩

    Person

    Feb 10, 2022

    thank you bruh and trans.boi.oliver

    👍 👎 🚩

    not a connexus baby

    Feb 10, 2022 They both right 👍 👎 🚩

    listen to Lana Del Ray

    Feb 10, 2022 bruh is right 👍 👎 🚩

    Anonymous

    Feb 16, 2022

    @trans.boi.oliver give me my money!

    👍 👎 🚩

    him

    Feb 28, 2022

    gib muns @trans.boi.oliver

    👍 👎 🚩

    lol

    Feb 28, 2022

    @bruh and @trans.boi.oliver are right! thank you!!!

    👍 👎 🚩

    Shrek

    Mar 2, 2022

    ikr they very helpful

    👍 👎 🚩

    Math Expert

    Mar 3, 2022

    which kid is right because youre wrong and youre workijg to because we have school and piggy hehe peppa pig susssssyyyyyyyyy I barked woof woof

    👍 👎 🚩

    tyler minaj

    Mar 7, 2022

    these. are . for. connexus............

    oliver is correct woof woof wooof woooooooof wooooofffff oink oink pepppaaaaa *susssyyynyyyyyy* peeeeepppppaaaaaaaaaaa I ate peppa for breakfast :)

    👍 👎 🚩

    tyler minaj

    Mar 7, 2022

    bruh is rigth I GOT 100!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!😁😁😁😁😁

    👍 👎 🚩

    ayesha

    Mar 12, 2022

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    Kurd

    Kurd, member of an ethnic and linguistic group living in the Taurus Mountains of southeastern Anatolia, the Zagros Mountains of western Iran, portions of northern Iraq, northeastern Syria, and western Armenia, and other adjacent areas. Most of the Kurds live in contiguous areas of Iran, Iraq, and Turkey—a somewhat loosely defined geographic region generally referred to as Kurdistan (“Land of the Kurds”). The name has different connotations in Iran and Iraq, which officially recognize internal entities by this name: Iran’s western province of Kordestān and Iraq’s Kurdish autonomous region. A sizable noncontiguous Kurdish population also exists in the Khorāsān region,

    Kurd

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    By The Editors of Encyclopaedia Britannica • Edit History

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    Key People: Abdullah Öcalan Mustafa al-Barzani Badr Khānī Jāladat

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    Kurd, member of an ethnic and linguistic group living in the Taurus Mountains of southeastern Anatolia, the Zagros Mountains of western Iran, portions of northern Iraq, northeastern Syria, and western Armenia, and other adjacent areas. Most of the Kurds live in contiguous areas of Iran, Iraq, and Turkey—a somewhat loosely defined geographic region generally referred to as Kurdistan (“Land of the Kurds”). The name has different connotations in Iran and Iraq, which officially recognize internal entities by this name: Iran’s western province of Kordestān and Iraq’s Kurdish autonomous region. A sizable noncontiguous Kurdish population also exists in the Khorāsān region, situated in Iran’s northeast.

    The Kurdish language and traditional way of life

    The Kurdish language is a West Iranian language related to Persian and Pashto. The Kurds are thought to number from 25 million to 30 million, including communities in Armenia, Georgia, Kazakhstan, Lebanon, Syria, and Europe, but sources for this information differ widely because of differing criteria of ethnicity, religion, and language; statistics may also be manipulated for political purposes.

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    Iraq: Kurds

    Although estimates of their precise numbers vary, the Kurds are reckoned to be the fourth largest ethnic group in the Middle...

    The traditional Kurdish way of life was nomadic, revolving around sheep and goat herding throughout the Mesopotamian plains and the highlands of Turkey and Iran. Most Kurds practiced only marginal agriculture. The enforcement of national boundaries beginning after World War I (1914–18) impeded the seasonal migrations of the flocks, forcing most of the Kurds to abandon their traditional ways for village life and settled farming; others entered nontraditional employment.

    History

    The prehistory of the Kurds is poorly known, but their ancestors seem to have inhabited the same upland region for millennia. The records of the early empires of Mesopotamia contain frequent references to mountain tribes with names resembling “Kurd.” The Kardouchoi whom the Greek historian Xenophon speaks of in Anabasis (they attacked the “Ten Thousand” near modern Zākhū, Iraq, in 401 BCE) may have been Kurds, but some scholars dispute this claim. The name Kurd can be dated with certainty to the time of the tribes’ conversion to Islam in the 7th century CE. Most Kurds are Sunni Muslims, and among them are many who practice Sufism and other mystical sects.

    Despite their long-standing occupation of a particular region of the world, the Kurds never achieved nation-state status. Their reputation for military prowess has made them much in demand as mercenaries in many armies. The sultan Saladin, best known to the Western world for exploits in the Crusades, epitomizes the Kurdish military reputation.

    Social organization

    The principal unit in traditional Kurdish society was the tribe, typically led by a sheikh or an aga, whose rule was firm. Tribal identification and the sheikh’s authority are still felt, though to a lesser degree, in the large urban areas. Detribalization proceeded intermittently as Kurdish culture became urbanized and was nominally assimilated into several nations.

    In traditional Kurdish society, marriage was generally endogamous. In nonurban areas, practices such as arranged marriage and child marriage are common. Households typically consist of father, mother, and children. Polygamy, permitted by Islamic law, is sometimes practiced, although in Turkey it is forbidden by civil law. The strength of the extended family’s ties to the tribe varies with the way of life. Along with Kurdish men, Kurdish women—who traditionally have been more active in public life than Turkish, Arab, and Iranian women, especially in prerevolutionary Iran—have taken advantage of urban educational and employment opportunities.

    The dream of autonomy

    Kurdish nationalism came about through the conjunction of a variety of factors, including the British introduction of the concept of private property, the partition of regions of Kurdish settlement by modern neighbouring states, and the influence of British, U.S., and Soviet interests in the Persian Gulf region. These factors and others combined with the flowering of a nationalist movement among a very small minority of urban, intellectual Kurds.

    The first Kurdish newspaper appeared in 1897 and was published at intervals until 1902. It was revived at Istanbul in 1908 (when the first Kurdish political club, with an affiliated cultural society, was also founded) and again in Cairo during World War I. The Treaty of Sèvres, drawn up in 1920, provided for an autonomous Kurdistan but was never ratified; the Treaty of Lausanne (1923), which replaced the Treaty of Sèvres, made no mention of Kurdistan or of the Kurds. Thus the opportunity to unify the Kurds in a nation of their own was lost. Indeed, Kurdistan after the war was more fragmented than before, and various separatist movements arose among Kurdish groups.

    Source : www.britannica.com

    Who are the Kurds?

    Kurds make up the Middle East's fourth-largest ethnic group, but they have never obtained statehood.

    Who are the Kurds?

    Published 15 October 2019

    IMAGE SOURCE, AFP

    Between 25 and 35 million Kurds inhabit a mountainous region straddling the borders of Turkey, Iraq, Syria, Iran and Armenia. They make up the fourth-largest ethnic group in the Middle East, but they have never obtained a permanent nation state.

    Where do they come from?

    The Kurds are one of the indigenous peoples of the Mesopotamian plains and the highlands in what are now south-eastern Turkey, north-eastern Syria, northern Iraq, north-western Iran and south-western Armenia.

    Today, they form a distinctive community, united through race, culture and language, even though they have no standard dialect. They also adhere to a number of different religions and creeds, although the majority are Sunni Muslims.

    Kurdistan: A State of Uncertainty

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    IMAGE SOURCE, REUTERS Image caption,

    Despite their long history, the Kurds have never achieved a permanent nation state

    In the early 20th Century, many Kurds began to consider the creation of a homeland - generally referred to as "Kurdistan". After World War One and the defeat of the Ottoman Empire, the victorious Western allies made provision for a Kurdish state in the 1920 Treaty of Sevres.

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    Such hopes were dashed three years later, however, when the Treaty of Lausanne, which set the boundaries of modern Turkey, made no provision for a Kurdish state and left Kurds with minority status in their respective countries. Over the next 80 years, any move by Kurds to set up an independent state was brutally quashed.

    Aiming to change the outcome of World War One

    Why were Kurds at the forefront of the fight against IS?

    IMAGE SOURCE, AFP Image caption,

    Iraqi Kurdish Peshmerga fighters have been fighting IS militants in northern Iraq

    In mid-2013, the jihadist group Islamic State (IS) turned its sights on three Kurdish enclaves that bordered territory under its control in northern Syria. It launched repeated attacks that until mid-2014 were repelled by the People's Protection Units (YPG) - the armed wing of the Syrian Kurdish Democratic Union Party (PYD).

    An IS advance in northern Iraq in June 2014 also drew that country's Kurds into the conflict. The government of Iraq's autonomous Kurdistan Region sent its Peshmerga forces to areas abandoned by the Iraqi army.

    In August 2014, the jihadists launched a surprise offensive and the Peshmerga withdrew from several areas. A number of towns inhabited by religious minorities fell, notably Sinjar, where IS militants killed or captured thousands of Yazidis.

    IMAGE SOURCE, AFP Image caption,

    Turkish military personnel did not intervene in the battle for Kobane

    In response, a US-led multinational coalition launched air strikes in northern Iraq and sent military advisers to help the Peshmerga. The YPG and the Kurdistan Workers' Party (PKK), which has fought for Kurdish autonomy in Turkey for three decades and has bases in Iraq, also came to their aid.

    In September 2014, IS launched an assault on the enclave around the northern Syrian Kurdish town of Kobane, forcing tens of thousands of people to flee across the nearby Turkish border. Despite the proximity of the fighting, Turkey refused to attack IS positions or allow Turkish Kurds to cross to defend it.

    IMAGE SOURCE, AFP Image caption,

    Kurds accused Turkish authorities of complicity after a 2015 suicide bombing in Suruc

    In January 2015, after a battle that left at least 1,600 people dead, Kurdish forces regained control of Kobane.

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    In October 2017, SDF fighters captured the de facto IS capital of Raqqa and then advanced south-eastwards into the neighbouring province of Deir al-Zour - the jihadists' last major foothold in Syria.

    IMAGE SOURCE,

    Source : www.bbc.com

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    James 10 month ago
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