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    which of the following is the study of the geographic distribution of species on earth?

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    Biogeography

    Biogeography

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    Biogeography is the study of the distribution of species and ecosystems in geographic space and through geological time. Organisms and biological communities often vary in a regular fashion along geographic gradients of latitude, elevation, isolation and habitat area.[1] Phytogeography is the branch of biogeography that studies the distribution of plants. Zoogeography is the branch that studies distribution of animals. Mycogeography is the branch that studies distribution of fungi, such as mushrooms.

    Knowledge of spatial variation in the numbers and types of organisms is as vital to us today as it was to our early human ancestors, as we adapt to heterogeneous but geographically predictable environments. Biogeography is an integrative field of inquiry that unites concepts and information from ecology, evolutionary biology, taxonomy, geology, physical geography, palaeontology, and climatology.[2][3]

    Modern biogeographic research combines information and ideas from many fields, from the physiological and ecological constraints on organismal dispersal to geological and climatological phenomena operating at global spatial scales and evolutionary time frames.

    The short-term interactions within a habitat and species of organisms describe the ecological application of biogeography. Historical biogeography describes the long-term, evolutionary periods of time for broader classifications of organisms.[4] Early scientists, beginning with Carl Linnaeus, contributed to the development of biogeography as a science.

    The scientific theory of biogeography grows out of the work of Alexander von Humboldt (1769–1859),[5] Francisco Jose de Caldas (1768-1816),[6] Hewett Cottrell Watson (1804–1881),[7] Alphonse de Candolle (1806–1893),[8] Alfred Russel Wallace (1823–1913),[9] Philip Lutley Sclater (1829–1913) and other biologists and explorers.[10]

    Contents

    1 Introduction 2 History 2.1 18th century 2.2 19th century

    2.3 20th and 21st century

    3 Modern applications

    4 Paleobiogeography

    5 Concepts and fields

    5.1 Comparative biogeography

    6 Biogeographic regionalisations

    7 See also

    8 Notes and references

    9 Further reading 10 External links

    Introduction[edit]

    The patterns of species distribution across geographical areas can usually be explained through a combination of historical factors such as: speciation, extinction, continental drift, and glaciation. Through observing the geographic distribution of species, we can see associated variations in sea level, river routes, habitat, and river capture. Additionally, this science considers the geographic constraints of landmass areas and isolation, as well as the available ecosystem energy supplies.

    Over periods of ecological changes, biogeography includes the study of plant and animal species in: their past and/or present living habitat; their interim living sites; and/or their survival locales.[11] As writer David Quammen put it, "...biogeography does more than ask and . It also asks and, what is sometimes more crucial, ."[12]

    Modern biogeography often employs the use of Geographic Information Systems (GIS), to understand the factors affecting organism distribution, and to predict future trends in organism distribution.[13] Often mathematical models and GIS are employed to solve ecological problems that have a spatial aspect to them.[14]

    Biogeography is most keenly observed on the world's islands. These habitats are often much more manageable areas of study because they are more condensed than larger ecosystems on the mainland.[15] Islands are also ideal locations because they allow scientists to look at habitats that new invasive species have only recently colonized and can observe how they disperse throughout the island and change it. They can then apply their understanding to similar but more complex mainland habitats. Islands are very diverse in their biomes, ranging from the tropical to arctic climates. This diversity in habitat allows for a wide range of species study in different parts of the world.

    One scientist who recognized the importance of these geographic locations was Charles Darwin, who remarked in his journal "The Zoology of Archipelagoes will be well worth examination".[15] Two chapters in were devoted to geographical distribution.

    History[edit]

    18th century[edit]

    The first discoveries that contributed to the development of biogeography as a science began in the mid-18th century, as Europeans explored the world and described the biodiversity of life. During the 18th century most views on the world were shaped around religion and for many natural theologists, the bible. Carl Linnaeus, in the mid-18th century, initiated the ways to classify organisms through his exploration of undiscovered territories. When he noticed that species were not as perpetual as he believed, he developed the Mountain Explanation to explain the distribution of biodiversity; when Noah's ark landed on Mount Ararat and the waters receded, the animals dispersed throughout different elevations on the mountain. This showed different species in different climates proving species were not constant.[4] Linnaeus' findings set a basis for ecological biogeography. Through his strong beliefs in Christianity, he was inspired to classify the living world, which then gave way to additional accounts of secular views on geographical distribution.[10] He argued that the structure of an animal was very closely related to its physical surroundings. This was important to a George Louis Buffon's rival theory of distribution.[10]

    Source : en.wikipedia.org

    what is the study of the geographic distribution of organisms

    biogeography, the study of the geographic distribution of plants, animals, and other forms of life.Nov 3, 2021

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    Contents

    1 What Is The Study Of The Geographic Distribution Of Organisms?

    2 What is the study of the geographic distribution of organisms in the present and the past?

    3 Is the study of the geographic distribution of living things?

    4 What is the study of geographical distribution of organisms called?

    5 What is geographic distribution in biology?

    6 Which of the following is the study of patterns in the geographic distribution of species and communities?

    7 Who started the study of geographical distribution of animals?

    8 What is meant by distribution of organisms?

    9 What is the study of geography about?

    10 What is the distribution of living organisms?

    11 What is Phytogeography in botany?

    12 What is evolution theory?

    13 What does analogous structure mean?

    14 How do you describe geographic distribution?

    15 What is geographical distribution for plants?

    16 What is your geographic location?

    17 What is the name for the study of the geographic distribution of species quizlet?

    18 What is an example of geographic distribution?

    19 How does geographic distribution support the theory of evolution?

    20 Who was the writer and publisher of the book geographic distribution of animals?

    21 What is Zoogeographical realm?

    22 What are the major Zoogeographical regions of the world?

    23 What does Distributed mean in science?

    24 What is an example of distribution in science?

    25 What factors determine the distribution of organisms?

    26 What is the study of geography quizlet?

    27 What are the five things that geographers study?

    28 Why is study of geography important?

    29 What determines the distribution and abundance of organisms?

    30 What is random distribution in ecology?

    31 Why do species varies in location and distribution?

    32 What is the study of the flora of a geographical location called?

    33 What is called study of algae?

    34 Why do geographers study plants?

    35 Geographic Distribution video notes

    36 Form 4 Biology lesson 14 Evidence Geographical distribution of organisms

    37 Evidence for evolution: modern geographic distribution of species

    38 Week 2 Lesson 1: Geographical Distribution and Evolution

    What Is The Study Of The Geographic Distribution Of Organisms?

    biogeography, the study of the geographic distribution of plants, animals, and other forms of life.Nov 3, 2021

    What is the study of the geographic distribution of organisms in the present and the past?

    Biogeography is the discipline of biology that studies the present and past distribution patterns of biological diversity and their underlying environmental and historical causes.

    Is the study of the geographic distribution of living things?

    Biogeography is the study of the geographic distribution of living things and the abiotic factors that affect their distribution. Abiotic factors such as temperature and rainfall vary based mainly on latitude and elevation.

    What is the study of geographical distribution of organisms called?

    Biogeography is the study of the patterns of geographic distribution of organisms and the factors that determine those patterns.

    See also  what are light independent reactions

    What is geographic distribution in biology?

    Definition of geographical distribution

    : the natural arrangement and apportionment of the various forms of animals and plants in the different regions and localities of the earth.

    Which of the following is the study of patterns in the geographic distribution of species and communities?

    Biogeography is the study of the distribution of species and ecosystems in geographic space and through geological time. Organisms and biological communities often vary in a regular fashion along geographic gradients of latitude, elevation, isolation and habitat area.

    Who started the study of geographical distribution of animals?

    Alfred Russel Wallace

    Wallace’s work. The Geographical Distribution of Animals, with a Study of the Living and Extinct Faunas, as Elucidating the Past Changes of the Earth’s Surface. By Alfred Russel Wallace. Two Vols.

    What is meant by distribution of organisms?

    In biology, the range of a species is the geographical area within which that species can be found. Within that range, distribution is the general structure of the species population, while dispersion is the variation in its population density.

    What is the study of geography about?

    Geography is the study of places and the relationships between people and their environments. Geographers explore both the physical properties of Earth’s surface and the human societies spread across it. … Geography seeks to understand where things are found, why they are there, and how they develop and change over time.

    What is the distribution of living organisms?

    Biogeography is the study of the geographic distribution of living things and the abiotic (non-living) factors that affect their distribution. Abiotic factors can include temperature, moisture, nutrients, oxygen, and energy availability, as well as disturbances from events such as wind and fire.

    Source : lisbdnet.com

    Chapter 13 Review Questions Flashcards

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    Chapter 13 Review Questions

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    Which of the following is the most recent example of evolution and natural selection?

    A. the genetic differences among the various populations on Earth

    B. the occurrence of many different breeds of dogs

    C. the development of pesticide-resistant insects

    D. the presence of long generation times in organisms

    Click card to see definition 👆

    The development of pesticide-resistant insects.

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    A process in which organisms with certain inherited characteristics are more likely to survive and reproduce than individuals with other characteristics is called ________.

    A. evolutionary adaptation

    B. descent with modification

    C. natural selection

    D. evolution

    Click card to see definition 👆

    Natural Selection

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    Terms in this set (29)

    Which of the following is the most recent example of evolution and natural selection?

    A. the genetic differences among the various populations on Earth

    B. the occurrence of many different breeds of dogs

    C. the development of pesticide-resistant insects

    D. the presence of long generation times in organisms

    The development of pesticide-resistant insects.

    A process in which organisms with certain inherited characteristics are more likely to survive and reproduce than individuals with other characteristics is called ________.

    A. evolutionary adaptation

    B. descent with modification

    C. natural selection

    D. evolution Natural Selection

    Which mechanism for evolution was proposed by Lamarck?

    A. evolution by inheritance of acquired characteristics

    B. evolution by punctuated equilibrium

    C. evolution by accumulation of mutations

    D. evolution by natural selection

    Evolution by inheritance of acquired characteristics.

    Which of the following statements about early ideas of evolution is true?

    A. Darwin sailed around Earth over a five-year period and gathered information that greatly influenced his thinking about evolution.

    B. Charles Darwin came up with the idea that species evolve.

    C. Aristotle thought that species evolved.

    D. Lamarck suggested the idea of natural selection.

    Darwin sailed around Earth over a five-year period and gathered information that greatly influenced his thinking about evolution.

    While on his voyage on the HMS Beagle, Darwin was strongly influenced by this book.

    A. Encyclopedia Britannica

    B. The Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection.

    C. The Beagle

    D. Principles of Geology by Charles Lyell

    Principles of Geology by Charles Lyell

    What do we call scientists who study fossils?

    A. comparative anatomists

    B. paleontologists

    C. comparative embryologists

    D. biogeographers Paleontologists

    Which of the following is the study of the geographic distribution of species on Earth?

    A. comparative anatomy

    B. biogeography C. paleontology

    D. comparative embryology

    Biogeography

    The study of comparative anatomy _____________.

    A. looks at early stages of development in different animal species

    B. supports the idea of fixed species

    C. is based on the genetic language of DNA and RNA

    D. provides information about the evolutionary history of species

    Provides information about the evolutionary history of species.

    A challenge to traditional (pre-1860) ideas about species came from embryology, where it was discovered that _________.

    A. all animals develop similar embryonic gills

    B. embryos of dissimilar organisms, such as sharks and humans, resemble each other

    C. the more advanced the animal, the more slowly it develops

    D. mutations have a far more dramatic effect on embryos than on adult organisms

    Embryos of dissimilar organisms, such as sharks and humans, resemble each other.

    Which of the following is a true statement?

    A. Species with nucleotide sequences that match closely share a common ancestor.

    B. Molecular biologists have suggested that bacteria are more closely related to eukaryotes than are members of the domain Archaea.

    C. Adaptation to the environment is not related to the origin of new species.

    D. The genetic language of DNA and RNA provides evidence that contradicts evolution of finches and other birds.

    Species with nucleotide sequences that match closely share a common ancestor.

    Which one of the following was an assumption of Charles Darwin's theory of natural selection?

    A. Organisms cooperate for limited resources.

    B. Earth is very young.

    C. Traits are inherited as discrete particles.

    D. Populations produce more offspring than their environment can support.

    Populations produce more offspring than their environment can support.

    Natural selection ___________.

    A. is independent of time or place

    B. is more of a creative process than an editing process

    C. and evolution cannot be directly observed

    D. relies on variation among individuals in a population

    Relies on variation among individuals in a population

    There is a group of small fish living in a lake with a sandy bottom. Most of the fish are light brown, but about 10% are mottled. These fish are normally prey for large birds that live on the shore. A construction company dumps a load of gravel in the bottom of the lake, giving it a mottled appearance. Which of these statements presents the most accurate prediction?

    Source : quizlet.com

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