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    which of the following explains a continuity in the effect of technological innovation on the production of goods in the late 1800s?

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    Unit 6 MCQ Flashcards

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    Unit 6 MCQ

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    Which of the following contexts best explains the increase in violent conflicts in the western United States in the late 1800s?

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    The increase in migration by White settlers

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    Farmers generally responded to industrialization in the late nineteenth century in which of the following ways?

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    They backed political movements calling for limits on corporate power and government ownership of transportation.

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    Terms in this set (36)

    Which of the following contexts best explains the increase in violent conflicts in the western United States in the late 1800s?

    The increase in migration by White settlers

    Farmers generally responded to industrialization in the late nineteenth century in which of the following ways?

    They backed political movements calling for limits on corporate power and government ownership of transportation.

    Which of the following best explains a key reason for rapid economic development during the Gilded Age?

    The consolidation of large industries facilitated mass production.

    The development of the railroads as described in the excerpt had which of the following effects on westward expansion in the late 1800s?

    New commercial centers and communities emerged along rail lines.

    The transportation development described in the excerpt had which of the following effects on agriculture in the United States?

    Farmers developed cooperative organizations to limit the power of rail companies.

    Which of the following developments best explains a cause of the historical process described in the excerpt?

    Government subsidies facilitated the construction of transportation and communication networks.

    Which of the following describes a difference between the arguments made by Chief Joseph and Commissioner Parker in the excerpts?

    Chief Joseph believed that Native American tribes had a right to sovereignty, while Commissioner Parker believed that Native American tribes were not sovereign nations.

    Unlike Commissioner Parker, Chief Joseph supports the claim that American Indians

    sought to preserve their culture

    Which of the following best describes a similarity between the arguments made by Chief Joseph and Commissioner Parker in the excerpts?

    Both argued against the signing of treaties to take American Indian lands.

    The opinion in the excerpt can best be used to support which of the following arguments about the Fourteenth Amendment?

    It was necessary to protect the civil rights of African Americans.

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    Verified questions

    US HISTORY

    In 1898 Theodore Roosevelt resigned his post as assistant secretary of the navy to organize the Rough Riders. Why do you think Roosevelt was willing to take this risk? How do you think this decision affected his political career?

    Verified answer QUESTION

    Consider the sources above in the light of this Abraham Lincoln comment: "although volume upon volume is written to prove slavery a very good thing, we never hear of a man who wishes to take the good of it, by being a slave himself."

    Verified answer US HISTORY

    Why was President Johnson impeached?

    Verified answer US HISTORY

    How did the Reformation deepen rivalries between European nations?

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    Source : quizlet.com

    history of Europe

    Developments in 19th-century Europe are bounded by two great events. The French Revolution broke out in 1789, and its effects reverberated throughout much of Europe for many decades. World War I began in 1914. Its inception resulted from many trends in European society, culture, and diplomacy during the late 19th century. In between these boundaries—the one opening a new set of trends, the other bringing long-standing tensions to a head—much of modern Europe was defined. Europe during this 125-year span was both united and deeply divided. A number of basic cultural trends, including new literary styles and the spread of

    Revolution and the growth of industrial society, 1789–1914

    Developments in 19th-century Europe are bounded by two great events. The French Revolution broke out in 1789, and its effects reverberated throughout much of Europe for many decades. World War I began in 1914. Its inception resulted from many trends in European society, culture, and diplomacy during the late 19th century. In between these boundaries—the one opening a new set of trends, the other bringing long-standing tensions to a head—much of modern Europe was defined.

    Europe during this 125-year span was both united and deeply divided. A number of basic cultural trends, including new literary styles and the spread of science, ran through the entire continent. European states were increasingly locked in diplomatic interaction, culminating in continentwide alliance systems after 1871. At the same time, this was a century of growing nationalism, in which individual states jealously protected their identities and indeed established more rigorous border controls than ever before. Finally, the European continent was to an extent divided between two zones of differential development. Changes such as the Industrial Revolution and political liberalization spread first and fastest in western Europe—Britain, France, the Low Countries, Scandinavia, and, to an extent, Germany and Italy. Eastern and southern Europe, more rural at the outset of the period, changed more slowly and in somewhat different ways.

    Europe witnessed important common patterns and increasing interconnections, but these developments must be assessed in terms of nation-state divisions and, even more, of larger regional differences. Some trends, including the ongoing impact of the French Revolution, ran through virtually the entire 19th century. Other characteristics, however, had a shorter life span.

    Some historians prefer to divide 19th-century history into relatively small chunks. Thus, 1789–1815 is defined by the French Revolution and Napoleon; 1815–48 forms a period of reaction and adjustment; 1848–71 is dominated by a new round of revolution and the unifications of the German and Italian nations; and 1871–1914, an age of imperialism, is shaped by new kinds of political debate and the pressures that culminated in war. Overriding these important markers, however, a simpler division can also be useful. Between 1789 and 1849 Europe dealt with the forces of political revolution and the first impact of the Industrial Revolution. Between 1849 and 1914 a fuller industrial society emerged, including new forms of states and of diplomatic and military alignments. The mid-19th century, in either formulation, looms as a particularly important point of transition within the extended 19th century.

    Source : www.britannica.com

    Immigration to the United States: Recent Trends and Future Prospects

    Almost 13 per cent of the American population is foreign born, and if the children of the foreign born are included, about 1 in 4 Americans can be counted as part of the recent immigrant community. Although there is lingering prejudice and popular fears ...

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    Journal ListHHS Author ManuscriptsPMC4302270

    Malays J Econ Studies. Author manuscript; available in PMC 2015 Jan 22.

    Published in final edited form as:

    Malays J Econ Studies. 2014; 51(1): 69–85.

    PMCID: PMC4302270

    NIHMSID: NIHMS648381

    PMID: 25620887

    Immigration to the United States: Recent Trends and Future Prospects+

    Charles Hirschman*

    Author information Copyright and License information Disclaimer

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    Abstract

    Almost 13 per cent of the American population is foreign born, and if the children of the foreign born are included, about 1 in 4 Americans can be counted as part of the recent immigrant community. Although there is lingering prejudice and popular fears of immigrants, there is growing evidence that, on balance, immigrants make a positive contribution to the American economy and society. There is little evidence that immigrants have an adverse impact on the wages and employment of native born Americans. Moreover, immigrants and their children are disproportionately represented in a broad variety of scientific and cultural fields.

    Keywords: Assimilation, demography, immigration, policy, United StatesJEL classification: F22, J18, J21

    Go to:

    1. Introduction

    The United States is, once again, in the midst of an age of immigration. In 2010, there were 40 million foreign-born persons living in the United States (Grieco et al. 2012). Of the 220 million international migrants in the world in 2010—defined as persons living outside their country of birth—almost one in five were residents in the United States (UN Population Division 2013). An even larger number, upwards of 75 million persons in the United States—almost one quarter of the current resident American population— is part of the immigrant community, defined as foreign born and the children of the foreign born (U.S. Bureau of the Census 2010).1

    In spite of lingering prejudice and discrimination against immigrants, most Americans are beginning to acknowledge the positive contributions of immigrants. These beliefs are partially rooted in the historical image of the United States as a ‘nation of immigrants.’ The story that America was populated by peoples seeking economic opportunity, fleeing injustice or oppression in their homeland, and hoping for a better life for their children has a strong grip on the American immigration. Moreover, there is a growing body of research that shows that most immigrants do assimilate to American society and that immigration has net positive impacts on the American economy, society, and culture.

    In this paper, I survey the trends in immigration to the United States with a focus on the most recent period—the Post 1965 Wave of Immigration, named for the reforms in immigration law that were enacted in the late 1960s as part of the Civil Rights revolution. I also review recent research on the demographic, economic, social, and cultural impact of immigration on American society.

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    2. Trends in Immigration to the United States

    Figure 1 shows the history of the absolute and relative levels of the foreign born population in the United States. The histogram—the solid bars—shows the numbers (in millions) of foreign born persons in the country from 1850 to 2012. The foreign born includes everyone who is born outside the United States, including students and workers residing here temporarily. This category also includes many undocumented immigrants—those residing in the country illegally. The curved line shows the ratio of foreign born persons to the total US population in each decennial census from 1850 to 2000 and the comparable figures for recent years from the American Community Survey.

    Figure 1

    Foreign born population and percent of total population for the United States, 1850–2010

    Source: US Bureau of Census, Census of Population, 1850–2000 (in Gibson and Jung, 2006), and American Community Survey, 2010.

    The absolute number of the foreign born population rose rapidly from the mid-19th century through the early decades of the 20th century—popularly known as the ‘Age of Mass Migration.’ With the cessation of large-scale immigration after 1924, the absolute numbers of foreign born declined to below 10 million by 1970. With the renewal of immigration in recent decades, the number of foreign born persons has risen dramatically and is currently around 40 million.

    The visibility of the foreign born—at work, in schools, and in neighbourhoods—is measured by the proportion of foreign born to the total population, that is, the curved line in Figure 1. It is to be noted that the contemporary presence of immigrants is actually less than it was in the early 20th century. For most of the 19th and early 20th centuries, the foreign born constituted around 14 to 15 per cent of the American population. Then, during the middle decades of the 20th century, the figure dropped precipitously to below 5 per cent in 1970. With the renewal of mass immigration after 1965, the percent foreign born is currently 13 per cent of the total population. While this figure is high relative to the period from 1950 to 1970, it is slightly below the proportion of foreign born for much of American history.

    Source : www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov

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