if you want to remove an article from website contact us from top.

    which of the following best describes what world war ii internees faced when they returned home? government apologies financial reparations property damage and discrimination discrimination and a return to normalcy

    James

    Guys, does anyone know the answer?

    get which of the following best describes what world war ii internees faced when they returned home? government apologies financial reparations property damage and discrimination discrimination and a return to normalcy from EN Bilgi.

    Japanese

    In his speech to Congress, President Franklin Delano Roosevelt declared that the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941, was "a date which will live in infamy." The attack launched the United States fully into the two theaters of World War II – Europe and the Pacific. Prior to Pearl Harbor, the United States had been involved in a non-combat role, through the

    Japanese-American Incarceration During World War II

    Japanese-American Incarceration During World War II On This Page

    Primary Sources Teaching Activity

    Additional Background Information

    In his speech to Congress, President Franklin Delano Roosevelt declared that the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941, was "a date which will live in infamy." The attack launched the United States fully into the two theaters of World War II – Europe and the Pacific. Prior to Pearl Harbor, the United States had been involved in a non-combat role, through the Lend-Lease Program that supplied England, China, Russia, and other anti-fascist countries of Europe with munitions.

    The attack on Pearl Harbor also launched a rash of fear about national security, especially on the West Coast. In February 1942, just two months later, President Roosevelt, as commander-in-chief, issued Executive Order 9066 that resulted in the internment of Japanese Americans. The order authorized the Secretary of War and military commanders to evacuate all persons deemed a threat from the West Coast to internment camps, that the government called "relocation centers," further inland. Read more...

    Primary Sources

    Links go to DocsTeach, the online tool for teaching with documents from the National Archives.

    Enlarge

    Meeting Between Lieutenant General John L. DeWitt and Representatives of the Department of Justice and the Army at the Office of Commanding General, Headquarters, Western Defense Command and Fourth Army, in San Francisco, 1/4/1942

    Enlarge

    Executive Order 9066 Issued by President Franklin D. Roosevelt, 2/19/1942

    Enlarge

    Posting of Exclusion Order in San Francisco, Directing Removal of Persons of Japanese Ancestry from the First Section in San Francisco to be Affected by the Evacuation, 4/11/1942

    Enlarge

    Thank You Note at the Iseri Drugstore in "Little Tokyo" in Los Angeles, California, 4/11/1942

    Enlarge

    Merchandise Sale in San Francisco, California, Where Customers Buy Goods Prior to Evacuation and Internment, 4/4/1942

    Enlarge

    Children Pledge Allegiance to the Flag in San Francisco, California, at Raphael Weill Public School, 4/20/1942

    Enlarge

    The Shibuya Family at Their Home in Mountain View, California, Before Being Sent to Heart Mountain Relocation Center in Wyoming Days Later, 4/18/1942

    Enlarge

    Ranch Superintendent Henry Futamachi (Left) Discusses Agriculture with Ranch Owner John MacKinley Before Evacuation and Internment, 4/10/1942

    Enlarge

    Dave Tatsuno Reading to His Son and Packing His Possessions Prior to Evacuation and Internment, 4/13/1942

    Enlarge

    Residents of Japanese Ancestry File Forms in San Francisco, Two Days Before Evacuation and Internment, 4/4/1942

    Enlarge

    Residents of Japanese Ancestry, With Baggage Stacked, Waiting for a Bus to be Evacuated at the Wartime Civil Control Administration in San Francisco, 4/6/1942

    Enlarge

    Japanese Family Heads and Persons Living Alone Line up for "Processing" in Response to Civilian Exclusion Order Number 20, 4/25/1942

    Enlarge

    Baggage Being Sorted and Trucked to Owners in Their Barracks at the Minidoka Internment Camp in Eden, Idaho, 8/17/1942

    Enlarge

    Registering and Assigning Barracks to the Newly Arrived at Minidoka Internment Camp in Eden, Idaho, 8/17/1942

    Enlarge

    The Hirano Family Posing with a Photograph of a United States Serviceman at the Colorado River Internment Camp in Poston, Arizona

    Source : www.archives.gov

    Internment and the Constitution Flashcards

    Start studying Internment and the Constitution. Learn vocabulary, terms, and more with flashcards, games, and other study tools.

    Internment and the Constitution

    4.8 54 Reviews

    What was the impact of President Roosevelt's approval of Executive Order 9066?

    Click card to see definition 👆

    More than 100,000 Japanese Americans were ordered to leave their homes and move to internment camps.

    Click again to see term 👆

    Internment camps were also known as

    Click card to see definition 👆

    Relocation centers

    Click again to see term 👆

    1/15 Created by greatannie80

    Terms in this set (15)

    What was the impact of President Roosevelt's approval of Executive Order 9066?

    More than 100,000 Japanese Americans were ordered to leave their homes and move to internment camps.

    Internment camps were also known as

    Relocation centers

    Fred Korematsu argued that internment was unconstitutional mainly because internees

    did not receive due process.

    Which is one advantage of using Navajo as a military code language?

    Since few people understood it, it was a difficult code to break.

    During World War II, the government argued that it should be able to waive the Fourteenth Amendment, claiming that the Constitution

    did not apply during war time.

    During World War II, the US government sent people of Japanese ancestry to internment camps based on

    whether they lived in an exclusion zone.

    Which of the following best describes one reason that thousands of Japanese Americans voluntarily joined the US military during World War II?

    to show their loyalty to the US

    Who was Fred Korematsu?

    an American citizen who lived in California

    How did the Navajo serve in World War II?

    as code talkers in the Pacific

    Which of the following best describes what World War II internees faced when they returned home?

    property damage and discrimination

    In the Supreme Court case Korematsu v. United States, the court decided that the Fourteenth Amendment

    could be waived in a time of emergency such as war.

    Why were Japanese Americans living on the West Coast interned after the Pearl Harbor attack?

    Many people feared the presence of Japanese spies after Japan had attacked Pearl Harbor.

    How did President Truman's Executive Order 9981 show progress toward racial equality?

    The order ended segregation in the military.

    Who issued Executive Order 9066?

    Franklin Roosevelt

    In Korematsu v. US (1944), the Supreme Court ruled that in a time of great "emergency and peril," the internment of Japanese Americans was .

    constitutional

    Related questions

    QUESTION

    Federal grants to the states have increased because ...

    15 answers QUESTION

    What was the main failure of the Articles of Confederation that eventually led to the US Constitution?

    15 answers QUESTION

    What are the four freedoms of the EU?

    15 answers QUESTION

    In the case Davis v. Baugh Industrial Contractors, Inc., the Washington state high court held that it would change the common law and abandon an old rule concerning employer liability for worksite injury:

    2 answers

    Sets found in the same folder

    Turning Points in the Pacific

    12 terms chelseabailey19

    Americans at War

    10 terms Hanah_C

    America's Entry into the War

    15 terms Trea_Castro

    McCarthyism

    10 terms chloegrogg

    Sets with similar terms

    Internment and the Constitution

    10 terms Hanah_C

    Internment and the Constitution

    10 terms lindsay_harris83

    Internment and the Constitution 100%

    10 terms Sochiiroll

    Internment and the Constitution

    10 terms chelseabailey19

    Other sets by this creator

    The Korean War

    48 terms greatannie80

    Korean War

    39 terms greatannie80

    Truman's Fair Deal

    10 terms greatannie80

    Treaties and Blocs

    16 terms greatannie80

    Other Quizlet sets

    Chapter 1 MindTap, Chapter 2 MindTap, Chapter…

    375 terms shay11_15

    History Chapter 14

    30 terms leobinx2

    World History Chapter 3 Part 2

    31 terms qxi

    Mr. Burruano's Midterm Review: 10th Grade

    48 terms mburruano1524

    Verified questions

    US GOVERNMENT

    How might the media influence policy or regulatory decisions made by a government agency or institution? Give a recent example from the news.

    Verified answer US GOVERNMENT

    Infer What are the two general principles that determine whether the federal courts have jurisdiction over a case? Do you think these principles are broad enough? Why or why not?

    Verified answer US GOVERNMENT

    Connect What is the relationship between the police power and the subordination of personal desires and interests to the public good?

    Verified answer US GOVERNMENT

    What problem of governing does the separation of powers address?

    Verified answer 1/6

    Source : quizlet.com

    Japanese American Incarceration

    At the time of the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor in 1941, about 120,000 persons of Japanese ancestry lived on the US mainland, mostly along the Pacific Coast. About two thirds were full citizens, born and raised in the United States. Following the Pearl Harbor attack, however, a wave of antiJapanese suspicion and fear led the Roosevelt administration to adopt a drastic policy toward these residents, alien and citizen alike.

    MORE PURCHASE TICKETS ARTICLE

    Japanese American Incarceration

    At the time of the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor in 1941, about 120,000 persons of Japanese ancestry lived on the US mainland, mostly along the Pacific Coast. About two thirds were full citizens, born and raised in the United States. Following the Pearl Harbor attack, however, a wave of antiJapanese suspicion and fear led the Roosevelt administration to adopt a drastic policy toward these residents, alien and citizen alike.

    Top Image: Library of Congress, LC-A351-T01-3-M-26.

    At the time of the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor in 1941, about 120,000 persons of Japanese ancestry lived on the US mainland, mostly along the Pacific Coast. About two thirds were full citizens, born and raised in the United States. Following the Pearl Harbor attack, however, a wave of antiJapanese suspicion and fear led the Roosevelt administration to adopt a drastic policy toward these residents, alien and citizen alike. Virtually all Japanese Americans were forced to leave their homes and property and live in camps for most of the war. The government cited national security as justification for this policy although it violated many of the most essential constitutional rights of Japanese Americans.

    Both the Office of Naval Intelligence and the Federal Bureau of Investigation had been conducting surveillance on Japanese Americans since the 1930s. After the Pearl Harbor attack, these two agencies, plus the Army’s G-2 intelligence unit, arrested over 3,000 suspected subversives, half of whom were of Japanese descent. As far as the agencies were concerned, the remaining Japanese American population did not pose a significant threat to national security.

    The public, however, was not convinced. Japanese victories in Guam, Malaya, and the Philippines helped fuel anti-Japanese-American hysteria, as did a January 1942 report claiming that Japanese Americans had given vital information to the Japanese government ahead of the Pearl Harbor attack. Many Pacific Coast citizens worried that local Japanese Americans might help the Japanese military launch attacks in their region. Walter Lippmann, a journalist whose columns were carried by newspapers across the United States, argued that the only reason Japanese Americans had not yet been caught plotting an act of sabotage was that they were waiting to strike when it would be most effective. Another influential columnist, Westbrook Pegler, put it more bluntly: “The Japanese in California should be under armed guard to the last man and woman right now and to hell with habeas corpus until the danger is over.”

    Despite the growing public pressure to act, government officials were uneasy about incarcerating Japanese Americans, especially those who were citizens, without a clear reason. Neither Attorney General Francis Biddle nor Secretary of War Henry Stimson believed the removal would be wise or even legal. Military leaders, however, as high up as Assistant Secretary of War John J. McCloy, insisted that this policy was absolutely necessary to ensure public safety on the Pacific Coast. Between the public demand for action and pressure from the military, Biddle buckled and told Stimson he would not object to a wholesale removal of Japanese Americans from the region. Stimson advised Roosevelt accordingly, and on February 19, 1942, the President signed Executive Order 9066, which directed the War Department to create “military areas” that anyone could be excluded from for essentially any reason.

    The new order gave the military the authority it needed to remove individuals of Japanese descent from the Pacific Coast, but where would they go? Federal officials hoped that these individuals might be able to find work as farm laborers, but many state and local authorities made it clear they did not want Japanese Americans moving into their areas. The governors of Montana and Wyoming feared it would spark racial violence. “Our people cannot tell an American-born Japanese from an alien,” said Montana Governor Sam C. Ford. “When casualty lists start coming in…I fear for the safety of any Japanese in this state.” Idaho’s Attorney General, Bert Miller, was less sympathetic. “We want to keep this a white man’s country,” he said. “All Japanese [should] be put in concentration camps for the remainder of the war.”

    Japanese Americans arriving at an assembly center near Stockton, California. Their possessions are piled outside awaiting inspection before being transferred to the barracks (1942).

    (Image: National Archives and Records Administration, 210-G-C404.)

    In the end, the newly created War Relocation Authority did move Japanese evacuees into a series of “relocation centers” for most of the rest of the war. Families were given only a few days to dispose of their property and report to temporary “assembly centers,” where they were held until the larger relocation centers were ready to receive them. Living conditions in these makeshift camps were terrible. One assembly center established at Santa Anita Park, a racetrack in southern California, housed entire families in horse stalls with dirt floors.

    Source : www.nationalww2museum.org

    Do you want to see answer or more ?
    James 11 month ago
    4

    Guys, does anyone know the answer?

    Click For Answer