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    which newspaper first printed the declaration of independence

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    First printing of the Declaration of Independence in a newspaper · The News Media and the Making of America, 1730

    First printing of the Declaration of Independence in a newspaper

    Description

    The Continental Congress charged five men with the responsibility to commit to paper the American colonies’ Declaration of Independence from Britain: Thomas Jefferson (1743-1826), Benjamin Franklin (1706-90), John Adams (1735-1826), Robert Livingston (1746-1813), and Roger Sherman (1721-93). Most scholars today now view the authorship of this document to be highly collaborative both among these five individuals (who made forty-seven alterations to Jefferson’s original draft) and among the members of Congress, who made another thirty-nine alterations after voting for independence on July 2, 1776.

    After the Declaration was approved on July 4, it was immediately set in type as a broadside and printed overnight by John Dunlap, the official printer to Congress. Copies of the printed version were immediately distributed to all of the colonies, where in some instances they were reprinted by local printers so that by July 18, twenty-four newspapers had republished the text of the Declaration. The Pennsylvania Evening Post, printed by Benjamin Towne (d. 1793), was the first newspaper to include the text in its pages.

    Click the image below to browse the full issue.

    Title

    First printing of the Declaration of Independence in a newspaper

    Alternative Title

    The Pennsylvania Evening Post

    Type

    Newspaper

    Date

    July 6, 1776

    Publisher

    Printed by Benjamin Towne

    Coverage

    Philadelphia, Pa.

    Format

    26 cm.

    Source

    AAS Catalog Record

    Tags

    Benjamin Franklin, Declaration of Independence, John Adams, Newspaper

    Citation

    “First printing of the Declaration of Independence in a newspaper,” The News Media and the Making of America, 1730-1865, accessed July 4, 2022, https://americanantiquarian.org/earlyamericannewsmedia/items/show/39.

    Source : americanantiquarian.org

    First Newspaper Printing of the Declaration of Independence

    This July 6, 1776 issue of the Pennsylvania Evening Post presented the first newspaper printing of the newly adopted Declaration of Independence.

    First Newspaper Printing of the Declaration of Independence

    On View

    Declaration of Independence

    Museum Map

    This July 6, 1776 issue of the Pennsylvania Evening Post presented the first newspaper printing of the newly adopted Declaration of Independence. Most Americans read or heard the words of the Declaration of Independence via newspapers and printed broadsides. In Philadelphia, a German language translation appeared in the July 9, 1776 issue of the Pennsylvanischer Staatsbote, a newspaper that served Pennsylvania’s large German-speaking community. By the end of August 1776, the Declaration had been reprinted in at least 29 newspapers and 14 broadsides.

    Object Details

    Pennsylvania Evening Post

    Printed by Benjamin Towne

    Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

    July 6, 1776 Paper, Ink

    Museum of the American Revolution

    2003.00.1167

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    Manuscripts & Printed Works

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    First Newspaper Printing of the Declaration of Independence Goes on Display at the Newseum

    /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- On July 1, the Newseum will open "1776 — Breaking News: Independence," a new exhibit featuring one of only 19 known copies of the...

    First Newspaper Printing of the Declaration of Independence Goes on Display at the Newseum

    Business Leader and Philanthropist David M. Rubenstein Lends Rare July 6, 1776, Newspaper for New Exhibit

    NEWS PROVIDED BY

    Newseum

    Jun 29, 2016, 03:30 ET

    WASHINGTON, June 29, 2016 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- On July 1, the Newseum will open "1776 — Breaking News: Independence," a new exhibit featuring one of only 19 known copies of the July 6, 1776, edition of , the first newspaper to publish the newly adopted Declaration of Independence. The rare newspaper is on loan to the Newseum from business leader and philanthropist David M. Rubenstein and will be on display in the museum's Pulliam Family History of Liberty Gallery through 2017.

    "1776 - Breaking News: Independence" opens July 1 at the Newseum in Washington, DC. Featuring illustrated graphics and a Newseum-produced film, the exhibit tells the story of what led delegates from all 13 Colonies to adopt the Declaration of Independence. Some of the most tumultuous and trying chapters in American history are highlighted, including the Stamp Act, the Boston Tea Party and news of war erupting from the battles of Lexington and Concord.

    On July 4, 1776, the Continental Congress adopted the Declaration of Independence. Two days later, The Pennsylvania Evening Post became the first newspaper to publish the declaration. On loan to the Newseum from David M. Rubenstein, it is one of only 19 known copies of the historic newspaper. Publisher Benjamin Towne scooped his competitors because he was one of the few Colonial printers who published three days a week, rather than once a week. This rare printing shows the declaration as many Americans first saw it -- as front-page news.

    "This extraordinary 240-year-old newspaper shows the Declaration of Independence as Americans first saw it — as front page news," said Cathy Trost, senior vice president of exhibits and programs at the Newseum. "The words and images of America's revolution come alive in this exhibit in dramatic graphic novel form to tell the story of how the Colonial press fanned the flames and spread the news of the fight for freedom."

    All four pages of will be displayed. Other pages of the newspaper offer a glimpse into the everyday life of Philadelphians in the 18th century. Among the items listed for sale in advertisements are sugar, spirits and very fine hay "of this year's growth." Another listing offers a $2 reward for the safe return of a 5-year-old brown horse that had strayed from its owner's pasture.

    Interactive kiosks in the exhibit allow visitors to zoom in and explore the newspaper in high definition. Illustrated panels around the gallery use the format of a graphic novel to tell the story of how and why delegates from the 13 American Colonies gathered in Philadelphia to break the bonds of British rule and forge a new nation. A Newseum-produced video, presented as a documentary graphic novel, will feature original animated illustrations and interviews with journalist Sebastian Junger, political commentator S.E. Cupp and "The Daily Show" contributor Lewis Black.

    On July 7, the Newseum will host a members-only reception and program featuring Rubenstein and Newseum president and CEO Jeffrey Herbst, who will discuss how the news of freedom spread through the world and played a crucial role in uniting American colonists behind the cause of independence.

    "1776 — Breaking News: Independence" was made possible with generous support from David M. Rubenstein.

    About the NewseumThe Newseum is dedicated to free expression and the five freedoms of the First Amendment: religion, speech, press, assembly and petition. Headquartered on historic Pennsylvania Avenue in Washington, D.C., the Newseum's compelling, dynamic and engaging exhibits, programs and education initiatives help ensure that these fundamental freedoms remain strong and protected both today and for future generations. The Newseum Institute promotes the study, exploration and education of the challenges confronting freedom through its First Amendment Center and the Religious Freedom Center. The Newseum is a 501(c)(3) public charity funded by generous individuals, corporations and foundations, including the Freedom Forum. For more information, visit newseum.org and follow us on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.

    Photo - http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20160629/384957

    Photo - http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20160629/384958

    SOURCE Newseum

    Related Links

    http://www.newseum.org

    Source : www.prnewswire.com

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