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    which material is a part of bedrock? silt plants wood water

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    Soil Survey

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    Soil Survey

    U.S. Department of Agriculture, 1980

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    Turn to Index to Soil Map Units

    5

    Detailed soil map units

    11 Soil properties 95

    Sık kullanılan terimler ve kelime öbekleri

    60 inches acid acres alkaline areas available water capacity base bedrock boundary brown 10YR brown silt loam building site development Charles chroma condition controlled corn cover crops dark brown dark grayish brown depth Dodge Dodge County dolomite drained soil drumlins easily engineering eroded erosion excessive Fair farmed feet fine firm floods formed friable frost action glacial grain grasses gravel gravelly grazing hazard horizon improve inches thick keep landscape limitations low strength lower map unit material medium Moderate moisture mottled needed organic pasture percent slopes periods permeable pine places plants poor poorly drained potential production proper range restricted rock sand sandy loam sanitary facilities seepage Severe shape silt loam silty clay loam similar Slight slow small areas soil is suited steep stocking subsoil substratum suitable surface layer thin till tilled trees Typically upper Variant Vegetation wetness yellowish brown

    Kaynakça bilgileri

    Başlık Soil Survey

    , United States. Bureau of Chemistry and Soils

    Katkıda Bulunanlar United States. Bureau of Chemistry and Soils, United States. Bureau of Plant Industry, United States. Bureau of Plant Industry, Soils, and Agricultural Engineering, United States. Soil Conservation Service, United States. Natural Resources Conservation Service

    Yayıncı U.S. Department of Agriculture, 1980

    Orijinalin kaynağı: Michigan Üniversitesi

    Dijital ortama aktarılmış 3 Mar 2010

    Alıntıyı Dışa Aktar BiBTeX EndNote RefMan

    Google Kitaplar Hakkında - Gizlilik Politikaları - Hizmet   Şartları - Yayıncılar için Bilgiler - Sorun bildir - Yardım - Google Ana Sayfası

    Source : books.google.com.tr

    Bedrock to Soil Flashcards

    Start studying Bedrock to Soil. Learn vocabulary, terms, and more with flashcards, games, and other study tools.

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    Soil

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    a loose mixture of small mineral fragments, organic material, water, and air that can support the growth of vegetation.

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    Soils are made from

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    weathered rock fragments therefore the type depends on the type of rock that weathers.

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    1/27 Created by amark71sc

    Terms in this set (27)

    Soil

    a loose mixture of small mineral fragments, organic material, water, and air that can support the growth of vegetation.

    Soils are made from

    weathered rock fragments therefore the type depends on the type of rock that weathers.

    Parent Rock

    rock formation that is the source of mineral fragments in the soil.

    Bedrock

    layer of rock beneath soil (this is the parent rock)

    Residual soil

    soil that remains above its parent rock

    transported soil

    soil blown or washed away from its parent rock

    soil texture

    the soil quality that is based on the proportions of soil particles (soil is made of different-sized particles).

    soil consistency

    describes a soil's ability to be worked and broken up for farming (soil texture affects this).

    Infiltration

    ability of water to move through soil (which is influenced by texture).

    soil structure

    arrangement of soil particles (water and air movement through soil is influenced by this).

    Humus

    organic material formed in soil from the decayed remains of plants and animals.

    soil fertility

    a soil's ability to hold nutrients and to supply nutrients to a plant.

    horizons

    horizontal layers: humus topsoil, sediment below that and bedrock on the bottom.

    leaching

    the removal of substances that can be dissolved from rock or layers of soil due to the passing of water.

    topsoil

    top layer of soil which contains more humus than the layers below

    pH scale

    used to measure how acidic or basic a soil is and can range from 0-14. 7 is neutral, soil below that is acidic, soil above 7 is basic.

    tropical rain forest climate

    very humid and land receives a large amount of rain. Warm soil temperatures allow dead plants and animals to decay easily providing rich humus, BUT due to leaching tropical topsoil is very thin and nutrient poor.

    desert climates

    get less than 25 cm of rain a year, salty conditions. Leaching is not a problem. Low rates of chemical weathering occur and less ability to support plant and animal life.

    lower rate of weathering

    means soil is created at a slower rate.

    temperate forest and grassland

    much of the US has this climate. An abundance of weather occurs and these areas get enough rain to cause a high level of chemical weather, but not high levels of leaching. Frequent changes in temp lead to frost action and as a result, thick fertile soils develop.

    temperate soils

    are some of the most productive soils in the world.

    "breadbasket"

    nickname to Midwest of US for the many crops the regions' soil supports (the is temperate soils).

    Grassland Climate

    has the most productive soil because the soil has the most nutrients in it.

    arctic climates

    little precipitation, cold deserts, chemical weathering very slow. Unable to support many plants.

    slow decomposion

    occurs in cold temperatures and limits the amount of humus in the soil.

    how is soil formed?

    weathering of bedrock

    pH level

    influences which nutrients plants can take up from the soil.

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    Verified questions

    EARTH SCIENCE

    What is true about climate conditions during the Cenozoic? Choose all that apply. a. Global temperature has progressively warmed since the beginning of the Cenozoic. b. Global temperature reached a maximum for the Cenozoic during the Paleocene and Eocene epochs. c. Climate fluctuated between cold and warm episodes in 100000 year cycles during the Miocene. d. Climate has progressively cooled since the Eocene.

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    Explain how Earth gets energy from the sun and what the atmosphere does with that energy to help life survive on Earth.

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    Abiotic Factors

    An abiotic factor is a non-living part of an ecosystem that shapes its environment. In a terrestrial ecosystem, examples might include temperature, light, and water. In a marine ecosystem, abiotic factors would include salinity and ocean currents. Abiotic and biotic factors work together to create a unique ecosystem. Learn more about abiotic factors with this curated resource collection.

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    RESOURCE LIBRARY COLLECTION

    ABIOTIC FACTORS

    An abiotic factor is a non-living part of an ecosystem that shapes its environment. In a terrestrial ecosystem, examples might include temperature, light, and water. In a marine ecosystem, abiotic factors would include salinity and ocean currents. Abiotic and biotic factors work together to create a unique ecosystem.

    Learn more about abiotic factors with this curated resource collection.

    GRADES 5 - 8 SUBJECTS

    Biology, Earth Science, Geology, Geography, Physical Geography

    Showing results 1 - 25 of 29

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    CONTENT TYPES

    SUBJECTS

    ENCYCLOPEDIC ENTRY

    41

    Humidity

    Geology, Physical Geography, Meteorology, Earth Science, Geography

    Have you ever visited a place that just made you feel hot and sticky the entire time, no matter what you did to cool off?

    GRADES

    6 - 12+

    ENCYCLOPEDIC ENTRY LEVELED

    120

    Coriolis Effect

    Earth Science, Physics, Geography, Physical Geography, Meteorology

    The Coriolis effect describes the pattern of deflection taken by objects not firmly connected to the ground as they travel long distances around the Earth.

    GRADES

    6 - 12+

    ENCYCLOPEDIC ENTRY

    57

    bedrock

    Earth Science, Geology, Physical Geography, Geography

    Bedrock is the relatively hard, solid rock beneath surface materials such as soil and gravel

    GRADES

    5 - 12+

    ENCYCLOPEDIC ENTRY

    310

    Ecosystem

    Geography, Meteorology, Human Geography, Earth Science, Physical Geography, Biology, Ecology

    An ecosystem is a geographic area where plants, animals, and other organisms, as well as weather and landscapes, work together to form a bubble of life.

    GRADES

    4 - 12+

    ENCYCLOPEDIC ENTRY

    100

    sediment

    Earth Science, Physical Geography, Geography

    Encyclopedic entry. Sediment is solid material that is moved and deposited in a new location. Sediment can consist of rocks and minerals, as well as the remains of plants and animals.

    GRADES

    5 - 12+

    ARTICLE

    71

    Cause and Effect: Tides

    Physical Geography, Geography, Earth Science, Oceanography, Experiential Learning

    The regular rise and fall of the ocean’s waters are known as tides. Along coasts, the water slowly rises up over the shore and then slowly falls back again.

    GRADES

    6 - 12+

    ENCYCLOPEDIC ENTRY

    29

    elevation

    Geology, Geographic Information Systems (GIS), Geography, Physical Geography, Earth Science

    Elevation is distance above sea level

    GRADES

    4 - 12+

    ENCYCLOPEDIC ENTRY

    30

    altitude

    Physical Geography, Geographic Information Systems (GIS), Geography

    Altitude, like elevation, is the distance above sea level

    GRADES

    6 - 12+

    ENCYCLOPEDIC ENTRY

    82

    Types of Precipitation

    Meteorology, Earth Science, Geography

    Precipitation is any type of water that forms in the Earth's atmosphere and then drops onto the surface of the Earth. Water vapor, droplets of water suspended in the air, builds up in the Earth's atmosphere before precipitating.

    GRADES

    4 - 12+

    Source : www.nationalgeographic.org

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