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    [Ans] Which Founding Father signed both the Declaration of Independence and the U.S. Constitution?

    Which Founding Father signed both the Declaration of Independence and the U.S. Constitution?- Thomas Jefferson, John Adams, and George Washington were not part of the team of men who signed both the Declaration of Independence and the United States Constitution. Jefferson and Adams, who were signers of the Declaration, did not sign the Constitution. George

    [Ans] Which Founding Father signed both the Declaration of Independence and the U.S. Constitution?

    July 4, 2022 by stardevilm

    Which Founding Father signed both the Declaration of Independence and the U.S. Constitution?– Thomas Jefferson, John Adams, and George Washington were not part of the team of men who signed both the Declaration of Independence and the United States Constitution. Jefferson and Adams, who were signers of the Declaration, did not sign the Constitution. George Washington, who signed the Constitution, didn’t sign the Declaration of Independence. In fact, only six people signed both the Declaration of Independence and the United States Constitution. These six included George Clymer, Benjamin Franklin, Robert Morris, George Read, Roger Sherman, and James Wilson.

    Which Founding Father signed both the Declaration of Independence and the U.S. Constitution?

    John Adams George Washington Thomas Jefferson Benjamin Franklin

    The correct Answer is Benjamin Franklin.

    Roger Sherman (1723-1793)—Roger Sherman was a member of the Committee of Five that was chosen to write the Declaration of Independence. He and Robert Morris were the only individuals to sign the Declaration of Independence, the Articles of Confederation and the Constitution.

    Only six Founders signed both the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution: George Clymer, Benjamin Franklin, Robert Morris.

    Morris was born into the Robert Morris tobacco making company family. He came from a family of wealth and as an American merchant

    There is a nearly unanimous consensus that George Washington was the Foundingest Father of them all. U.S. Constitution.

    Declaration of Independence Learn More The Declaration of Independence expresses the … The Bill of Rights is the first 10 amendments to the Constitution.

      Answer of Which Founding Father signed both the Declaration of Independence and the U.S. Constitution?

    Thomas Jefferson, John Adams, and George Washington were not part of the team of men who signed both the Declaration of Independence and the United States Constitution. Jefferson and Adams, who were signers of the Declaration, did not sign the Constitution. George Washington, who signed the Constitution, didn’t sign the Declaration of Independence. In fact, only six people signed both the Declaration of Independence and the United States Constitution. These six included George Clymer, Benjamin Franklin, Robert Morris, George Read, Roger Sherman, and James Wilson.

    Which Founding Father signed both the Declaration of Independence and the U.S. Constitution?

    Benjamin Franklin

    Where is Which Founding Father signed both the Declaration of Independence and the U.S. Constitution?

    Answer of Which Founding Father signed both the Declaration of Independence and the U.S. Constitution? is present on this webpage.

    Source : question.neoideasblog.com

    Declaration of Independence, US Constitution, Constitution Day Materials, Pocket Constitution Book, Bill of Rights

    The Declaration of Independence, US Constitution, Bill of Rights, Articles Of Confederation. Constitution IQ Quiz, Constitution Day Materials, Constitution Bookstore, Pocket Constitution Books, Constitution Amendments. Fascinating Facts about the Constitution, Founding Fathers, Supreme Court and more.

    About the Signers of the Declaration of Independence

    Connecticut • Delaware • Georgia • Maryland • Massachusetts • New Hampshire • New Jersey • New York • North Carolina • Pennsylvania • South Carolina • Rhode Island • Virginia

    All of the colonies were represented in Philadelphia to consider the delicate case for independence and to change the course of the war.  In all, there were fifty-six representatives from the thirteen colonies.  Fourteen represented the New England Colonies, twenty-one represented the Middle Colonies and twenty-one represented the Southern Colonies.  The largest number (9) came from Pennsylvania.  Most of the signers were American born although eight were foreign born.  The ages of the signers ranged from 26 (Edward Rutledge) to 70 (Benjamin Franklin), but the majority of the signers were in their thirties or forties.  More than half of the signers were lawyers and the others were planters, merchants and shippers.  Together they mutually pledged “to each other our Lives, our Fortunes and our sacred Honor.”  They were mostly men of means who had much to lose if the war was lost.  None of the signers died at the hands of the British, and one-third served as militia officers during the war. Four of the signers were taken captive during the war and nearly all of them were poorer at the end of the war than at the beginning.  No matter what each of these men did after July 1776, the actual signing of the Declaration of Independence which began on August 2 ensured them instant immortality.  The following gives a bit of information about each signer AFTER the signing of the Declaration of Independence.

    Connecticut

    Samuel Huntington (1731-1796)—Samuel Huntington was a self-made man who distinguished himself in government on the state and national levels. He was the President of Congress from 1779-1781 and presided over the adoption of the Articles of Confederation in 1781.  He returned to Connecticut and was the Chief Justice of the Superior Court in 1784, Lieutenant Governor in 1785 and Governor from 1786-1796.  He was one of the first seven presidential electors from Connecticut.

    Roger Sherman (1723-1793)—Roger Sherman was a member of the Committee of Five that was chosen to write the Declaration of Independence.  He and Robert Morris were the only individuals to sign the Declaration of Independence, the Articles of Confederation and the Constitution.   He was the Judge of the Superior Court of Connecticut from 1766-1789, a member of the Continental Congress from 1774-81; 1783-84 and a delegate to the Constitutional Convention in 1787.  Sherman proposed the famed “Connecticut Compromise” at the convention and represented Connecticut in the United States Senate from 1791-93.

    William Williams (1731-1811)—William Williams was a graduate of Harvard, studied theology with his father and eventually became a successful merchant.  He fought in the French-Indian War and returned to Lebanon, Connecticut where he served for forty-four years as the town clerk.  He was elected to the Continental Congress from 1776-1777, and after signing the Declaration of Independence, Williams was a member of the committee that was instrumental in framing the Articles of Confederation.  He was a delegate to vote on the ratification of the Federal Constitution and also served as a Judge of the Windham County Courthouse.

    Oliver Wolcott (1726-1797)—Oliver Wolcott was as much a soldier as he was a politician and served as a brigadier general in the New York campaigns from 1776-1777.  As a major general, he was involved in defending the Connecticut coast from attacks by the Royal Governor of New York.  He was Commissioner of Indian Affairs in 1775 and from 1784-89, a delegate to the Continental Congress from 1775-76 and 1778-84, Lieutenant Governor of Connecticut from 1786-96 and Governor from 1796-97.

    Delaware

    Thomas McKean (1734-1817)—Thomas McKean was the last member of the Second Continental Congress to sign the Declaration of Independence.  He was a delegate to the Continental Congress from 1774-81 and served as a delegate to the Congress of the Confederation from 1781-1783.  After 1783, McKean became involved in the politics of Pennsylvania becoming  Chief Justice of Pennsylvania and the Governor of Pennsylvania from 1799-1812.  He retired from politics in 1812 and died at the age of 83 in 1817.

    George Read (1733-1798)—George Read was the only signer of the Declaration of Independence who voted against the proposal for independence introduced by Richard Henry Lee of Virginia.  He was elected to the Continental Congress from 1774-1776, was a member of the Delaware Constitutional Convention in 1776, acting Governor of Delaware in 1777, a Judge on the Court of Appeals in 1780, State Senator from 1791-92, a United States Senator from 1789-1793 and Chief Justice of the State of Delaware from 1793-98.

    Source : www.constitutionfacts.com

    [Answer] Which Founding Father signed both the Declaration of Independence and the U.S. Constitution?

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    [Answer] Which Founding Father signed both the Declaration of Independence and the U.S. Constitution?

    Step 1 : Introduction to the question "Which Founding Father signed both the Declaration of Independence and the U.S. Constitution?"

    ...Thomas Jefferson, John Adams, and George Washington were not part of the team of men who signed both the Declaration of Independence and the United States Constitution. Jefferson and Adams, who were signers of the Declaration, did not sign the Constitution. George Washington, who signed the Constitution, didn’t sign the Declaration of Independence. In fact, only six people signed both the Declaration of Independence and the United States Constitution. These six included George Clymer, Benjamin Franklin, Robert Morris, George Read, Roger Sherman, and James Wilson.

    Step 2 : Answer to the question "Which Founding Father signed both the Declaration of Independence and the U.S. Constitution?"

    Benjamin Franklin:

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