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    which form of vision allows you to read and see fine details?

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    Which form of vision allows you to read and see fine details?

    Which form of vision allows you to read and see fine details?? (Multiple Choice Questions and Answers) >>

    Which form of vision allows you to read and see fine details?

    Which form of vision allows you to read and see fine details?

    This is a List of Available Answers Options :

    Peripheral Focal Paracentral Far Near

    The best answer is B. Focal.

    Reported from teachers around the world. The correct answer to ❝Which form of vision allows you to read and see fine details?❞ question is B. Focal.

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    Using your Eyes Effectively

    Using your eyes effectively: To get the right information to the brain, a drivers eyes have to move constantly and pick out the appropriate spots at the right time. Learn more about driving at DriversEd.com.

    Using your Eyes Effectively

    Using your Eyes Effectively Learn all about our Defensive Driving & Driving information

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    Home / Driving Information / Defensive Driving / Using your Eyes Effectively

    Using your Eyes Effectively

    Gathering information with your eyes is called visual perception. Safe driving depends on your ability to notice many things at once.

    To get the right information to the brain, a drivers eyes have to move constantly and pick out the appropriate spots at the right time.

    Our eyes provide two types of visions:

    Central vision

    Peripheral or side vision

    Our central vision covers about three degrees of our visual field and peripheral vision, or side vision, covers the rest. The three degrees of central vision is a very small area in your total field of vision. But central vision allows us to make very important judgments like estimating distance and understanding details in the path ahead.

    Our peripheral vision is not as sharp as central vision, but it is more sensitive to light and motion. That's a good thing because it helps us detect events to the side that are important to us, even when we're not looking directly at them. Events like cars entering our field of vision from the side, or warning lights from ambulances, police cars, and other emergency vehicles are all observed using peripheral vision.

    Central vision plus side vision make up the entire visual field, which is the main source of information that all drivers need for safe driving. Most driving mistakes are caused by bad habits in the way drivers use their eyes.

    1. AIM HIGH—Look ahead, not down. The experienced drivers attention is focused on the road ahead with his or her central vision following the intended path of travel.

    2. KEEP YOUR EYES MOVING—A good driver concentrates on selecting details in the traffic scene.

    3. GET THE BIG PICTURE—Search the whole scene; check the rearview mirrors. Source: Using Your Eyes Effectively, a movie by the AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety

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    How your eyes work

    The open eye features the pupil, the black centre, the iris, the coloured ring surrounding the pupil, and the sclera, the white of the eye. The caruncle is tucked into the inner corner of the eye, while the upper and lower eyelids lubricate and protect. Our vision allows us to be aware of our surroundings. […]

    How your eyes work

    The open eye features the pupil, the black centre, the iris, the coloured ring surrounding the pupil, and the sclera, the white of the eye. The caruncle is tucked into the inner corner of the eye, while the upper and lower eyelids lubricate and protect.

    Our vision allows us to be aware of our surroundings. Eighty per cent of everything we learn is through our sight.

    Your eye works in a similar way to a camera. When you look at an object, light reflected from the object enters the eyes through the pupil and is focused through the optical components within the eye.

    The front of the eye is made of the cornea, iris, pupil and lens, and focuses the image onto the retina. The retina is the light sensitive membrane that covers the back of the eye. This membrane consists of millions of nerve cells which gather together behind the eye to form a large nerve called the optic nerve.

    Image of eye anatomy side view. At the front of the eye is the cornea and anterior chamber underneath it. Below that is the iris, the coloured ring which surrounds the pupil, which is the opening in the centre. The lens is underneath the iris and held in place by the suspensory ligament at the top and the posterior chamber and ciliary body and muscle below the eye. The retina forms the circular shape at the back of the eye surrounded by a layer called the choroid and then another layer called the sclera. Within the retina is the macula the size of a pinpoint, vitreous body and blood vessels. The optic nerve protrudes from the back of the eyeball and consist of blood vessels.

    When the light enters the eye, it is focused to a pinpoint on the macula, a small area in the centre of the retina at the back of the eye. The macula is responsible for central detailed vision, allowing you to see fine detail and colour, read and recognise faces.

    When light stimulates the nerve cells in the retina, messages are sent along the optic nerve to the brain. The optic nerves from the two eyes join inside the brain. The brain uses information from each optic nerve to combine the vision from the two eyes allowing you to see one image.

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    How your eyes work (PDF)

    How your eyes work (RTF)

    Source : www.visioninitiative.org.au

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