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    which features make this an example of a shakespearean sonnet? select three options. the abab, cdcd, efef, gg rhyme scheme the groupings of two stressed syllables the widespread use of iambic pentameter the use of three quatrains followed by a couplet the fact that the final lines summarize the preceding lines

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    Shakespearean Sonnet

    Learn the definition of the Shakespearean sonnets and discover their form and rhyme scheme. Explore the characteristics of William Shakespeare's...

    English Courses / Course / Chapter

    Shakespearean Sonnets

    Sasha Blakeley, Shamekia Thomas

    Learn the definition of the Shakespearean sonnets and discover their form and rhyme scheme. Explore the characteristics of William Shakespeare's sonnets. Updated: 10/28/2021

    Table of Contents

    What is a Shakespearean Sonnet?

    Shakespearean Sonnet Form

    Characteristics of Shakespearean Sonnets

    Shakespearean Sonnet vs. Petrarchan Sonnet

    Lesson Summary Show Create an account

    What is a Shakespearean Sonnet?

    What is a Shakespearean sonnet? To fully understand Shakespearean sonnets, it is first necessary to learn the history of the sonnet form and Shakespeare's place in English literature. Sonnets are a type of poem that dates back to Sicily in the 13th century. They became popular in Italian literature before eventually arriving in Britain. William Shakespeare, a famous playwright and poet, developed his sonnet style with a unique rhyme scheme and structure. Not all Shakespearean sonnets were penned by Shakespeare himself; he developed the style, but it then exploded in popularity. The Shakespearean sonnet definition was codified after Shakespeare published his collection of 154 sonnets in 1609.

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    Shakespearean Sonnet Form

    What is the structure of a Shakespearean sonnet? The Shakespearean sonnet form is slightly different from earlier Italian forms, making it recognizable. It retains certain quintessential features of the sonnet, especially having fourteen lines and primarily thematically focused on romantic love. Otherwise, Shakespeare's sonnet form differs from those that came before it.

    Shakespeare's sonnets are made up of three quatrains, or four-line stanzas, followed by one couplet, or two-line stanza. His sonnets are written in iambic pentameter, which is a specific poetic rhythm. If a poem is iambic, then its lines alternate between unstressed and stressed syllables. One pair of unstressed-stressed syllables is called an '' Iambic pentameter means that each line has five feet and has an overall rhythm of ''da-DUM da-DUM da-DUM da-DUM da-DUM.'' This pattern can be seen clearly in sonnet 21, where the stressed syllables are bolded:

    There are a few instances in this sonnet where Shakespeare alters the rhythm slightly, but this poem is still considered a strong example of iambic pentameter in a Shakespearean sonnet.

    Exceptions to the Rule

    Shakespeare developed a new sonnet form.

    Three of the original 154 Shakespearean sonnet poems have a different structure from the standard Shakespearean sonnet. Sonnet 99 has fifteen lines instead of fourteen: its third stanza is not a quatrain but a cinquain, but it still ends with a couplet. Sonnet 126 has only twelve lines. It has two quatrains and then two couplets. Despite their differing numbers of lines, sonnets 99 and 126 are still written in iambic pentameter. Sonnet 145 has fourteen lines, but it is the only one of Shakespeare's sonnets written in iambic tetrameter, with four feet per line instead of five. These sonnets read:

    Sonnet 99 Sonnet 126 Sonnet 145

    Shakespearean Sonnet Rhyme Scheme

    The Shakespearean sonnet rhyme scheme is another distinctive attribute of this sonnet form. In many cases, determining what kind of sonnet one is reading can be done most simply by looking at the poem's rhyme scheme. As discussed above, with the exceptions of sonnets 99 and 126, Shakespearean sonnets almost always follow quite a precise rhyme pattern. Each of the three quatrains will rhyme the first line with the third and the second line with the fourth. The couplet at the end of the poem will be a rhyming pair. This rhyme scheme is demonstrated in sonnet 18, one of the most famous Shakespearean sonnets, where rhyming words are bolded for clarity:

    This rhyme scheme is usually written as ABAB CDCD EFEF GG. It helps make the breaks between the quatrains easier to see and gives the poem a lyrical quality.

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    Frequently Asked Questions

    What are the rules of a Shakespearean sonnet?

    Shakespearean sonnets must:

    Have fourteen lines

    Be written in iambic pentameter

    Have an ABAB CDCD EFEF GG rhyme scheme

    Have three quatrains followed by a couplet

    Have a volta between the second and third stanzas

    How does Shakespeare handle the sonnet form?

    Shakespeare adapted the sonnet form and created his own version of it. His sonnets are written in iambic pentameter but have a different stanza structure and rhyme scheme from Petrarchan sonnets.

    Do all Shakespearean sonnets follow the same rhyme scheme?

    Generally speaking, Shakespearean sonnets always follow the same rhyme scheme. Shakespeare himself wrote two sonnets that break with the rhyme scheme, but these are considered anomalies and are not thought to be representative of the form as a whole.

    How do you write a Shakespearean rhyme scheme?

    Shakespearean sonnets usually have the rhyme scheme ABAB CDCD EFEF GG. This means that the first and third lines must rhyme, and the second and fourth lines must rhyme. In the next set of four lines, the same pattern is repeated with different rhymes. The poem ends with a rhyming couplet.

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    WILL BRAINLEST 100 POINTS ASAP WILL GIVE PRIZERead Shakespeare's Sonnet 19.Devouring Time, blunt thou the lion's paws,And make the earth devour her own sweet brood;Pluck the keen teeth from the fierce tiger's jaws,And burn the long

    Free video and text solution: Answer: This is an example of a Shakespearean sonnet because of:the abab, cdcd, efef, gg rhyme schemethe widespread use of iambic pentameterthe use of three quatrains followed by a coupletExplanation:In 1609, Shakespeare published 154 sonnets, among which is Sonnet 19. The poem deals with the power of time.This sonnet is representative of a Shakespearean sonnet because:It follows the typical the abab, cdcd, efef, gg rhyme scheme the widespread use of iambic pentameter  (a rhyme scheme in which each line contains ten syllables -five pairs which are called iambs). For instance, But I forbid thee one more heinous crime. the use of three quatrains followed by a couplet. The first twelve lines in a sonnet are divided into three quatrains (each containing 4 lines), followed by a couplet (two lines written in the same rhyme and meter). | Snapsolve

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    WILL BRAINLEST 100 POINTS ASAP WILL GIVE PRIZERead Shakespeare's Sonnet 19.Devouring Time, blunt thou the lion's paws,And make the earth devour her own sweet brood;Pluck the keen teeth from the fierce tiger's jaws,And burn the long-liv'd phoenix, in her blood;Make glad and sorry seasons as thou fleets,And do whate'er thou wilt, swift-footed Time,To the wide world and all her fading sweets;But I forbid thee one most heinous crime:O! carve not with thy hours my love's fair brow,Nor draw no lines there with thine antique pen;Him in thy course untainted do allowFor beauty's pattern to succeeding men.Yet, do thy worst old Time: despite thy wrong,My love shall in my verse ever live young.Which features make this an example of a Shakespearean sonnet? Select three options.the abab, cdcd, efef, gg rhyme schemethe groupings of two stressed syllablesthe widespread use of iambic pentameterthe use of three quatrains followed by a coupletthe fact that the final lines summarize the preceding lines

    Question

    WILL BRAINLEST 100 POINTS ASAP WILL GIVE PRIZE

    Read Shakespeare's "Sonnet 19.”

    Devouring Time, blunt thou the lion's paws,

    And make the earth devour her own sweet brood;

    Pluck the keen teeth from the fierce tiger's jaws,

    And burn the long-liv'd phoenix, in her blood;

    Make glad and sorry seasons as thou fleets,

    And do whate'er thou wilt, swift-footed Time,

    To the wide world and all her fading sweets;

    But I forbid thee one most heinous crime:

    O! carve not with thy hours my love's fair brow,

    Nor draw no lines there with thine antique pen;

    Him in thy course untainted do allow

    For beauty's pattern to succeeding men.

    Yet, do thy worst old Time: despite thy wrong,

    My love shall in my verse ever live young.

    Which features make this an example of a Shakespearean sonnet? Select three options.

    the abab, cdcd, efef, gg rhyme scheme

    the groupings of two stressed syllables

    the widespread use of iambic pentameter

    the use of three quatrains followed by a couplet

    the fact that the final lines summarize the preceding lines

    Answer

    Answer: This is an example of a Shakespearean sonnet because of:the abab, cdcd, efef, gg rhyme schemethe widespread use of iambic pentameterthe use of three quatrains followed by a coupletExplanation:

    In 1609, Shakespeare published 154 sonnets, among which is Sonnet 19. The poem deals with the power of time.

    This sonnet is representative of a Shakespearean sonnet because:

    It follows the typical the abab, cdcd, efef, gg rhyme scheme the widespread use of iambic pentameter  (a rhyme scheme in which each line contains ten syllables -five pairs which are called iambs). For instance, "But I forbid thee one more heinous crime."the use of three quatrains followed by a couplet. The first twelve lines in a sonnet are divided into three quatrains (each containing 4 lines), followed by a couplet (two lines written in the same rhyme and meter).

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    What Is a Sonnet? The 6 Forms, Explained

    What is the sonnet form? Our complete guide to this popular type of poem breaks down meter, rhyme scheme, and literary significance.

    What Is a Sonnet? The 6 Forms, Explained

    Posted by Hannah Muniz | Jul 1, 2019 2:00:00 PM

    GENERAL EDUCATION

    You’ve likely read at least a few sonnets in English class, perhaps during a Shakespeare unit. But what is a sonnet exactly? Is there just one sonnet form? Did Shakespeare invent it?

    Read on to learn about the history of the sonnet and the various qualities that make up a sonnet poem, including the traditional sonnet rhyme scheme and meter. We'll also go over all the major types of sonnets, give you examples, and offer a handful of tips for writing your very own sonnet poem.

    What Is a Sonnet? Overview & History

    A sonnet is a short lyric poem that consists of 14 lines, typically written in iambic pentameter (a 10-syllable pattern of stressed and unstressed syllables) and following a specific rhyme scheme (of which there are several—we’ll go over this point more in just a moment).

    In addition, sonnets have something called a volta (twist or turn), in which the rhyme scheme and the subject of the poem suddenly change, often to indicate a response to a question, a solution to a problem, or the resolving of some sort of tension established at the beginning of the poem. This turn normally happens closer to the end of the sonnet, though precisely when it appears varies depending on the particular sonnet form.

    Now, what about the history of the sonnet?

    Originating in Italy, the sonnet comes from the Italian word sonetto, meaning "little song" or "little sound." The oldest known sonnet form was invented by Italian poet Francesco Petrach in the 14th century. Called the Petrarchan or Italian sonnet, this sonnet structure consists of first an octave (eight lines of verse in iambic pentameter) and then a sestet (six lines). The rhyme scheme is abba abba; the rhyme scheme in the sestet can vary a little but is typically cde cde or cdc dcd.

    But it is perhaps famed 16th-century English poet and playwright William Shakespeare who came up with the most well-known and easily recognizable sonnet form. In the Shakespearean or English sonnet, each line is 10 syllables long written in iambic pentameter. The structure can be divided into three quatrains (four-line stanzas) plus a final rhyming couplet (two-line stanza). The Shakespearean sonnet rhyme scheme is abab cdcd efef gg.

    Many other sonnet structures have been invented by an array of poets (we’ll go over what these are shortly). In terms of themes, these days sonnets are most often associated with themes of love and romance, though topics such as death, time, and faith are not uncommon.

    Petrarchan vs Shakespearean: The 2 Main Sonnet Forms

    As I explained above, the two main types of sonnets are the Petrarchan (or Italian) sonnet and the Shakespearean (or English) sonnet.

    Before we go over both of these types in more detail, let’s take a quick look at some of the key similarities and differences between the two sonnet forms:

    Origin# of LinesIambic Pentameter?StructureRhyme SchemeVoltaPetrarchan Sonnet

    Italian 14 Yes

    An octave and a sestet

    abba abba cde cde

    OR

    abba abba cdc dcd

    Between the eighth and ninth lines

    Shakespearean Sonnet

    English 14 Yes

    Three quatrains and a rhyming couplet

    abab cdcd efef gg

    Between the 12th and 13th lines

    Portrait of Francesco Petrarch

    Petrarchan Sonnet

    The Petrarchan sonnet is the original sonnet structure developed by Italian poet Francesco Petrarch. To reiterate, here are the main characteristics of this sonnet form:

    Structure: An octave followed by a sestetVolta: Happens between the eighth and ninth linesRhyme Scheme: abba abba followed by cde cde OR cdc dcd

    Let’s look at an example of a classic Petrarchan sonnet. The following poem was written by famed 19th-century English poet Elizabeth Barrett Browning. Sonnet 43, commonly referred to as, "How Do I Love Thee?" follows the Petrarchan sonnet rhyme scheme of abba abba cdc dcd:

    Sonnet 43 by Elizabeth Barrett Browning

    How do I love thee? Let me count the ways. (a)

    I love thee to the depth and breadth and height (b)

    My soul can reach, when feeling out of sight (b)

    For the ends of being and ideal grace. (a)

    I love thee to the level of every day’s (a)

    Most quiet need, by sun and candle-light. (b)

    I love thee freely, as men strive for right; (b)

    I love thee purely, as they turn from praise. (a)

    I love thee with the passion put to use (c)

    In my old griefs, and with my childhood’s faith. (d)

    I love thee with a love I seemed to lose (c)

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