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    which excerpt from “good country people” is the best example of figurative language? the reason for her keeping them so long was that they were . . . good country people. mr. freeman was a good farmer but that his wife was the nosiest woman ever to walk the earth. she would make these statements, usually at the table, in a tone of gentle insistence as if no one held them but her. mrs. hopewell had no bad qualities of her own but she was able to use other people’s in such a constructive way that she never felt the lack.

    James

    Guys, does anyone know the answer?

    get which excerpt from “good country people” is the best example of figurative language? the reason for her keeping them so long was that they were . . . good country people. mr. freeman was a good farmer but that his wife was the nosiest woman ever to walk the earth. she would make these statements, usually at the table, in a tone of gentle insistence as if no one held them but her. mrs. hopewell had no bad qualities of her own but she was able to use other people’s in such a constructive way that she never felt the lack. from EN Bilgi.

    Ch.5 Unit Test Flashcards

    Study with Quizlet and memorize flashcards terms like Read the excerpt from the interview with E.Y. (Yip) Harburg. We thought American business was the Rock of Gibraltar. We were the prosperous nation, and nothing could stop us now. A brownstone house was forever. You gave it to your kids and they put marble fronts on it. There was a feeling of continuity. If you made it, it was there forever. Suddenly the big dream exploded. How do Harburg's words reflect the experience of many Americans during the Great Depression? Like Harburg, many expected that they could maintain their possessions through the Depression. Like Harburg, many were shocked by stock market collapse and ensuing Depression. Like Harburg, many were grateful for the lessons they learned from the Depression. Like Harburg, many made meticulous plans to prepare for the Depression., Read the excerpt from the interview with E.Y. (Yip) Harburg. When I lost my possessions, I found my creativity. I felt I was being born for the first time. So for me the world became beautiful. With the Crash, I realized that the greatest fantasy of all was business. The only realistic way of making a living was versifying. Living off your imagination. Based on the excerpt, which best describes Harburg's view of the Great Depression? He has no interest in financial success for himself. He values artistic success over financial success for himself. He believes most people benefited from losing their financial stability. He regrets the fact that he gave away his money to benefit his art., Read the excerpt from Flannery O'Connor's "The Life You Save May Be Your Own." He was more depressed than ever as he drove on by himself. The late afternoon had grown hot and sultry and the country had flattened out. Which best describes the irony in the excerpt? The heat of the day is indicative of Mr. Shiftlet's negative feelings of his life and situation. Mr. Shiftlet would have preferred to travel with his new wife, Lucynell, but she has left him at the diner. The young boy rejected Mr. Shiftlet's offer to give him a ride, and now the man finds himself alone. Mr. Shiftlet has the car he wanted and managed to rid himself of his wife, but he still is not happy. and more.

    Ch.5 Unit Test

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    Read the excerpt from the interview with E.Y. (Yip) Harburg.

    We thought American business was the Rock of Gibraltar. We were the prosperous nation, and nothing could stop us now. A brownstone house was forever. You gave it to your kids and they put marble fronts on it. There was a feeling of continuity. If you made it, it was there forever. Suddenly the big dream exploded.

    How do Harburg's words reflect the experience of many Americans during the Great Depression?

    Like Harburg, many expected that they could maintain their possessions through the Depression.

    Like Harburg, many were shocked by stock market collapse and ensuing Depression.

    Like Harburg, many were grateful for the lessons they learned from the Depression.

    Like Harburg, many made meticulous plans to prepare for the Depression.

    Click card to see definition 👆

    Like Harburg, many were shocked by stock market collapse and ensuing Depression.

    Click again to see term 👆

    Read the excerpt from the interview with E.Y. (Yip) Harburg.

    When I lost my possessions, I found my creativity. I felt I was being born for the first time. So for me the world became beautiful.

    With the Crash, I realized that the greatest fantasy of all was business. The only realistic way of making a living was versifying. Living off your imagination.

    Based on the excerpt, which best describes Harburg's view of the Great Depression?

    He has no interest in financial success for himself.

    He values artistic success over financial success for himself.

    He believes most people benefited from losing their financial stability.

    He regrets the fact that he gave away his money to benefit his art.

    Click card to see definition 👆

    He values artistic success over financial success for himself.

    Click again to see term 👆

    1/25 Created by zomb1eslayer51

    Terms in this set (25)

    Read the excerpt from the interview with E.Y. (Yip) Harburg.

    We thought American business was the Rock of Gibraltar. We were the prosperous nation, and nothing could stop us now. A brownstone house was forever. You gave it to your kids and they put marble fronts on it. There was a feeling of continuity. If you made it, it was there forever. Suddenly the big dream exploded.

    How do Harburg's words reflect the experience of many Americans during the Great Depression?

    Like Harburg, many expected that they could maintain their possessions through the Depression.

    Like Harburg, many were shocked by stock market collapse and ensuing Depression.

    Like Harburg, many were grateful for the lessons they learned from the Depression.

    Like Harburg, many made meticulous plans to prepare for the Depression.

    Like Harburg, many were shocked by stock market collapse and ensuing Depression.

    Read the excerpt from the interview with E.Y. (Yip) Harburg.

    When I lost my possessions, I found my creativity. I felt I was being born for the first time. So for me the world became beautiful.

    With the Crash, I realized that the greatest fantasy of all was business. The only realistic way of making a living was versifying. Living off your imagination.

    Based on the excerpt, which best describes Harburg's view of the Great Depression?

    He has no interest in financial success for himself.

    He values artistic success over financial success for himself.

    He believes most people benefited from losing their financial stability.

    He regrets the fact that he gave away his money to benefit his art.

    He values artistic success over financial success for himself.

    Read the excerpt from Flannery O'Connor's "The Life You Save May Be Your Own."

    He was more depressed than ever as he drove on by himself. The late afternoon had grown hot and sultry and the country had flattened out.

    Which best describes the irony in the excerpt?

    The heat of the day is indicative of Mr. Shiftlet's negative feelings of his life and situation.

    Mr. Shiftlet would have preferred to travel with his new wife, Lucynell, but she has left him at the diner.

    The young boy rejected Mr. Shiftlet's offer to give him a ride, and now the man finds himself alone.

    Mr. Shiftlet has the car he wanted and managed to rid himself of his wife, but he still is not happy.

    Mr. Shiftlet has the car he wanted and managed to rid himself of his wife, but he still is not happy.

    Read the excerpt from Flannery O'Connor's "The Life You Save May Be Your Own."

    They drove back to the house to let the old woman off and pick up the lunch. When they were ready to leave, she stood staring in the window of the car, with her fingers clenched around the glass. Tears began to seep sideways out of her eyes and run along the dirty creases in her face. "I ain't ever been parted with her for two days before," she said.

    Which best describes the irony in the excerpt?

    Mrs. Crater has never been separated from her daughter, and now she must let her go for two days.

    Mrs. Crater's tears are insincere because she is happy that her daughter is finally leaving her alone.

    Instead of experiencing the joy of gaining a son-in-law, Mrs. Crater feels the sorrow of losing her daughter.

    As the two part ways, Lucynell does not feel the same amount of emotional despair as her mother.

    Source : quizlet.com

    Mrs. Freeman Character Analysis in Good Country People

    Get everything you need to know about Mrs. Freeman in Good Country People. Analysis, related quotes, timeline.

    Good Country People

    by

    Flannery O’Connor

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    Mrs. Freeman Character Analysis

    Mrs. Freeman is Mrs. Hopewell’s tenant and employee, largely in charge of running the farm. She is described as efficient and like a machine, so focused on everything being just right that her previous employer warned Mrs. Hopewell of her nosiness. Mrs. Hopewell puts this to her advantage, reasoning that if Mrs. Freeman wants to be in charge of everything, then let her. Mrs. Freeman often gossips with Mrs. Hopewell about superficial things, or about her daughters, Carramae and Glynese Freeman. These conversations involve frequent use of platitudes and clichés, with Mrs. Freeman typically agreeing with whatever her employer says. When interacting with Hulga, Mrs. Freeman shows an interest in Hulga’s artificial leg, asking repeatedly for details about how the accident happened. Mrs. Freeman thinks of herself as more in touch with reality than Mrs. Hopewell, as being superior in her own way. But the events of the story shows that she isn’t: at the story’s end, Mrs. Freeman watches the Bible Salesman walk out of the woods, and, not realizing what has transpired between the Bible Salesman and Hulga, reflects that, “Some can’t be that simple…I know I never could.”

    Mrs. Freeman Quotes in Good Country People

    The Good Country People quotes below are all either spoken by Mrs. Freeman or refer to Mrs. Freeman. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one: ).

    Good Country People Quotes

    By the time Joy came in, they had usually finished the weather report and were on one or the other of Mrs. Freeman’s daughters, Glynese or Carramae, Joy called them Glycerin and Caramel.

    Related Characters: Hulga Hopewell (Joy), Mrs. Hopewell, Mrs. Freeman, Carramae and Glynese Freeman – Page Number: 272Explanation and Analysis:

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    The reason for her keeping them so long was that they were not trash. They were good country people.

    Related Characters: Mrs. Hopewell, Mrs. Freeman Page Number: 272Explanation and Analysis:

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    “Lord,” she said, “he bored me to death but he was so sincere and genuine I couldn’t be rude to him. He was just good country people, you know,” she said, “—just the salt of the earth.”

    Related Characters: Mrs. Hopewell (speaker), Mrs. Freeman, The Bible Salesman Page Number: 282Explanation and Analysis:

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    “Why, that looks like that nice dull young man that tried to sell me a Bible yesterday,” Mrs. Hopewell said, squinting. “He must have been selling them to the Negroes back there. He was so simple,” she said, “but I guess the world would be better off if we were all that simple.”

    Related Characters: Mrs. Hopewell (speaker), Mrs. Freeman, The Bible Salesman Page Number: 291Explanation and Analysis:

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    Mrs. Freeman Character Timeline in Good Country People

    The timeline below shows where the character Mrs. Freeman appears in Good Country People. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.

    Good Country People

    The story begins with a description of Mrs. Freeman , a woman working on a farm in rural Georgia. She is described as having... (full context)

    The story’s action begins at breakfast. Mrs. Hopewell, who owns the farm and employs Mrs. Freeman , begins the morning routine: she lights the gas heaters, and then her daughter goes... (full context)

    Hulga stays in the bathroom until Mrs. Freeman has arrived, and her small talk with Mrs. Hopewell is almost done. Mrs. Hopewell and... (full context)

    Mrs. Hopewell is proud to introduce Mrs. Freeman , Carramae, and Glynese around town. When she had been looking for a new tenant... (full context)

    Mrs. Hopewell comments on how helpful Mrs. Freeman has been, and Mrs. Freeman agrees. No matter what Mrs. Hopewell says, Mrs. Freeman agrees... (full context)

    Source : www.litcharts.com

    Do you want to see answer or more ?
    James 10 day ago
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    Guys, does anyone know the answer?

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