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    which country is located primarily on the jutland peninsula?

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    Jutland

    Jutland

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    For other uses, see Jutland (disambiguation).

    The North Jutlandic Island is still regarded as a part of Jutland although it was separated from mainland Jutland by a flood in 1825.

    Northern Jutland (Denmark)

    South Jutland or Northern Slesvig (Denmark)

    Southern Schleswig (Germany)

    Holstein (Germany)

    Jutland (Danish: [ˈjyˌlænˀ]; German: [ˈjyːtlant]; Old English: [ˈeːo.tɑˌlɒnd]), known anciently as the Cimbric or Cimbrian Peninsula (Latin: ; Danish: ; German: ), is a peninsula of Northern Europe that forms the continental portion of Denmark and part of northern Germany. The names are derived from the Jutes and the Cimbri, respectively.

    As with the rest of Denmark, Jutland's terrain is flat, with a slightly elevated ridge down the central parts and relatively hilly terrains in the east. West Jutland is characterised by open lands, heaths, plains and peat bogs, while East Jutland is more fertile with lakes and lush forests. Southwest Jutland is characterised by the Wadden Sea, a large unique international coastal region stretching through Denmark, Germany and the Netherlands.

    Contents

    1 Geography 1.1 Danish portion 1.2 German portion 1.2.1 Cities 2 Geology 3 History

    3.1 World War I and Battle of Jutland

    3.2 World War II 4 Culture 4.1 Dialect 4.2 Literature 5 References 6 External links

    Geography[edit]

    Dunes on Jutland's northwest coast.

    Jutland is a peninsula bounded by the North Sea to the west, the Skagerrak to the north, the Kattegat and Baltic Sea to the east, and Germany to the south. Geographically and historically, Jutland comprises the regions of South Jutland (historically also Slesvig), West Jutland, East Jutland (including Djursland) and North Jutland (including Himmerland, Vendsyssel, Hanherred and Thy). Since the mid-20th century, it has also become common to designate an area called Central Jutland (), but its definition varies. There are several historical subdivisions and regional names, and some are encountered today. They include (a historical name for the whole area north of South Jutland, and not identical with ), , (the southernmost stretch of Nørrejylland, as opposed to the more southern ), , , and others. Politically, Jutland currently comprises the three contemporary Danish Administrative Regions of North Jutland Region, Central Denmark Region and the Region of Southern Denmark, along with portions of the German state of Schleswig-Holstein.[1]

    The northernmost part of Jutland is separated from the mainland by the Limfjord, a narrow stretch of water bisecting the peninsula from coast to coast. The Limfjord was formerly a long brackish water inlet, but the February flood of 1825 created a coast to coast connection.[2] This area is called the North Jutlandic Island, Vendsyssel-Thy (after its districts) or simply ; it is only partly coterminous with the North Jutland Region.

    The islands of Læsø, Anholt and Samsø in Kattegat and Als at the rim of the Baltic Sea are administratively and historically tied to Jutland, although the latter two are also regarded as traditional districts of their own. Inhabitants of Als, known as , would agree to be South Jutlanders, but not necessarily Jutlanders.[]

    The Danish Wadden Sea Islands and the German North Frisian Islands stretch along the southwest coast of Jutland in the German Bight.

    Danish portion[edit]

    Flensburg has the largest Danish minority of any city in Germany.

    The largest cities in the Danish section of Jutland are as follows:

    Aarhus Aalborg Esbjerg Randers Kolding Horsens Vejle Herning Silkeborg Fredericia

    Aarhus, Silkeborg, Billund, Randers, Kolding, Horsens, Vejle, Fredericia and Haderslev, along with a number of smaller towns, make up the suggested East Jutland metropolitan area, which is more densely populated than the rest of Jutland, although far from forming one consistent city.

    Administratively, Danish Jutland comprises three of Denmark's five regions, namely Nordjylland, Midtjylland and the western half of Southern Denmark, which includes Funen. The five administrative regions came into effect on 1 January 2007, following a structural reform.[3]

    German portion[edit]

    Main article: Schleswig-Holstein

    Kiel is the largest city on the German side of the Jutland Peninsula.

    The southern third of the peninsula is made up of the German Bundesland of Schleswig-Holstein. The German parts are usually not seen as Jutland proper, but often described more abstract as part of the Jutlandic Peninsula, Cimbrian Peninsula or Jutland-Schleswig-Holstein.

    Source : en.wikipedia.org

    Denmark Country Profile

    Denmark is a country in northern Europe. It is made up of the Jutland Peninsula and more than 400 islands in the North Sea.

    1 / 5

    Cities in Denmark have many canals.

    Cities in Denmark have many canals.

    PHOTOGRAPH BY TANYASV, ISTOCKPHOTO

    Denmark

    Denmark is a country in northern Europe. It is made up of the Jutland Peninsula and more than 400 islands in the North Sea.

    FAST FACTS

    OFFICIAL NAME: Kingdom of Denmark

    FORM OF GOVERNMENT: Constitutional monarchy

    CAPITAL: Copenhagen

    POPULATON: 5,809,502

    OFFICIAL LANGUAGE: Danish

    MONEY: Krone

    AREA: 16,638 square miles (43,094 square kilometers)

    GEOGRAPHY

    Denmark is a country in northern Europe. It is made up of the Jutland Peninsula and more than 400 islands in the North Sea. It shares a border with Germany to the south. The country is almost two times the size of Massachusetts.

    Denmark's terrain is mostly flat, with gently rolling hills. During the Ice Age, glaciers moved slowly across the landmass and shaped the country that exists today. Denmark has a long coastline with many lagoons, gulfs, and inlets. No part of Denmark is more than 32 miles (67 kilometers) from the sea.

    Although Denmark is in northern Europe, the warm waters of the Gulf Stream make the climate mild.

    In Denmark, windmills were used to grind grain into flour.

    PHOTOGRAPH BY CORNEL ACHIREI, ISTOCKPHOTO

    PEOPLE & CULTURE

    The people of Denmark are known as Danes. They are Nordic Scandinavians, many of which are blond, blue-eyed, and tall. In the southern part of the country, some people have German ancestry.

    Danes have one of the highest standards of living in the world. All Danish families receive over $1,500 each year for each child under 18 years old. About 85 percent of Danish people belong to the National Church of Denmark. The capital city of Copenhagen is home to more than 1 million people.

    Open sandwiches called smørrebrød are a typical Danish lunch. These sandwiches are made of cold cuts, cheese, and spreads on a piece of dark, rye bread.

    Danes often ride bicycles as a form of transportation.

    NATURE

    Denmark was once covered with trees, but almost all of the original forest has been chopped down. The largest mammal living in Denmark today is the red deer. There are about 300 species of birds in Denmark. During the summer, many different butterfly species can be found in Denmark.

    LEFT: DANISH FLAG, RIGHT: KRONEPhotograph by Trovor, Dreamstime

    GOVERNMENT

    Denmark is a constitutional monarchy. Queen Margrethe II celebrated 40 years on the throne in January 2012. Denmark has the longest unbroken line of rulers in Europe. Queen Margrethe II can trace her ancestry back to King Gorm in the tenth century.

    Although the Queen is the head of state, the prime minister is the head of the government. Denmark's Parliament has a single chamber called the Folketing, made up of 179 elected members.

    HISTORY

    People have lived in Denmark since the Stone Age, but there is evidence that people lived there around 50,000 B.C. In the 9th to 11th centuries, Viking warriors from Denmark and other Scandinavian countries raided Europe. Most of Denmark's modern cities were founded after the Viking era.

    Denmark, Norway, and Sweden were united as the Union of Kalmar by Queen Margrethe in the late 14th century. Although Sweden broke away from the Union in 1523, Norway was ruled by Denmark until 1814.

    During World War II, the governments of Germany and Denmark agreed that they would not attack each other, but Germany made a surprise attack on Denmark in 1940. Although the country was able to keep its own government at first, Germany took over in 1943.

    WATCH "DESTINATION WORLD"

    Source : kids.nationalgeographic.com

    Denmark

    Denmark, country occupying the peninsula of Jutland (Jylland), which extends northward from the centre of continental western Europe, and an archipelago of more than 400 islands to the east of the peninsula. Jutland makes up more than two-thirds of the country’s total land area; at its northern tip is the island of Vendsyssel-Thy (1,809 square miles [4,685 square km]), separated from the mainland by the Lim Fjord. The largest of the country’s islands are Zealand (Sjælland; 2,715 square miles [7,031 square km]), Vendsyssel-Thy, and Funen (Fyn; 1,152 square miles [2,984 square km]). Along with Norway and Sweden, Denmark is a

    Denmark

    Alternate titles: Danmarkip Nâlagauvfia, Kingdom of Denmark, Kongaríkidh Danmark, Kongeriget Danmark

    By Stanley Victor Anderson See All • Last Updated: Jun 28, 2022 • Edit History

    flag of Denmark

    Audio File: National anthem of DenmarkAudio File: Royal anthem of Denmark

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    Head Of Government: Prime Minister: Mette Frederiksen

    Capital: Copenhagen

    Population: (2022 est.) 5,893,000

    Currency Exchange Rate: 1 USD equals 7.128 Danish krone

    Head Of State: Danish Monarch: Queen Margrethe II

    See all facts & stats →

    Summary

    Read a brief summary of this topic

    Denmark, country occupying the peninsula of Jutland (Jylland), which extends northward from the centre of continental western Europe, and an archipelago of more than 400 islands to the east of the peninsula. Jutland makes up more than two-thirds of the country’s total land area; at its northern tip is the island of Vendsyssel-Thy (1,809 square miles [4,685 square km]), separated from the mainland by the Lim Fjord. The largest of the country’s islands are Zealand (Sjælland; 2,715 square miles [7,031 square km]), Vendsyssel-Thy, and Funen (Fyn; 1,152 square miles [2,984 square km]). Along with Norway and Sweden, Denmark is a part of the northern European region known as Scandinavia. The country’s capital, Copenhagen (København), is located primarily on Zealand; the second largest city, Århus, is the major urban centre of Jutland.

    Boats docked in Copenhagen harbour.

    Neil Beer/Getty Images

    Though small in territory and population, Denmark has nonetheless played a notable role in European history. In prehistoric times, Danes and other Scandinavians reconfigured European society when the Vikings undertook marauding, trading, and colonizing expeditions. During the Middle Ages, the Danish crown dominated northwestern Europe through the power of the Kalmar Union. In later centuries, shaped by geographic conditions favouring maritime industries, Denmark established trading alliances throughout northern and western Europe and beyond, particularly with Great Britain and the United States. Making an important contribution to world culture, Denmark also developed humane governmental institutions and cooperative, nonviolent approaches to problem solving.

    Denmark

    Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc.

    BRITANNICA QUIZ You Name It!

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    This article covers principally the land and people of continental Denmark. However, the Kingdom of Denmark also encompasses the Faroe Islands and the island of Greenland, both located in the North Atlantic Ocean. Each area is distinctive in history, language, and culture. Home rule was granted to the Faroes in 1948 and to Greenland in 1979, though foreign policy and defense remain under Danish control.

    Land

    Denmark is attached directly to continental Europe at Jutland’s 42-mile (68-km) boundary with Germany. Other than this connection, all the frontiers with surrounding countries are maritime, including that with the United Kingdom to the west across the North Sea. Norway and Sweden lie to the north, separated from Denmark by sea lanes linking the North Sea to the Baltic Sea. From west to east, these passages are called the Skagerrak, the Kattegat, and The Sound (Øresund). Eastward in the Baltic Sea lies the Danish island of Bornholm.

    Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc.

    Coast of Bornholm, Den., on the Baltic Sea.

    G. Glase/Ostman Agency

    Relief

    Denmark proper is a lowland area that lies, on average, not more than 100 feet (30 metres) above sea level. The country’s highest point, reaching only 568 feet (173 metres), is Yding Forest Hill (Yding Skovhøj) in east-central Jutland.

    The basic contours of the Danish landscape were shaped at the end of the Pleistocene Epoch (i.e., about 2,600,000 to 11,700 years ago) by the so-called Weichsel glaciation. This great glacial mass withdrew temporarily during several warmer interstadial periods, but it repeatedly returned to cover the land until it retreated to the Arctic north for the last time about 10,000 years ago. As a result, the barren layers of chalk and limestone that earlier constituted the land surface acquired a covering of soil that built up as the Weichsel retreated, forming low, hilly, and generally fertile moraines that diversify the otherwise flat landscape.

    A scenic boundary representing the extreme limit reached by the Scandinavian and Baltic ice sheets runs from Nissum Fjord on the western coast of Jutland eastward toward Viborg, from there swinging sharply south down the spine of the peninsula toward Åbenrå and the German city of Flensburg, just beyond the Danish frontier. The ice front is clearly marked in the contrast between the flat western Jutland region, composed of sands and gravels strewn by meltwaters that poured west from the shrinking ice sheet, and the fertile loam plains and hills of eastern and northern Denmark, which become markedly sandier toward the prehistoric ice front. (See also Scandinavian Ice Sheet.)

    Source : www.britannica.com

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