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    which best describes the role of the us supreme court in the 2000 presidential election? it declared george w. bush the winner of the election. it refused to become involved in the election. it ordered a recount in florida, resulting in bush’s election. it stopped a recount in florida, resulting in bush’s election.

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    get which best describes the role of the us supreme court in the 2000 presidential election? it declared george w. bush the winner of the election. it refused to become involved in the election. it ordered a recount in florida, resulting in bush’s election. it stopped a recount in florida, resulting in bush’s election. from EN Bilgi.

    Bush v. Gore

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    Supreme Court of the United States

    Argued December 11, 2000

    Decided December 12, 2000

    Full case name Docket no. 00-949

    Citations 531 U.S. 98 ()

    121 S. Ct. 525; 148 L. Ed. 2d 388; 2000 U.S. LEXIS 8430; 69 U.S.L.W. 4029; 2000 Cal. Daily Op. Service 9879; 2000 Colo. J. C.A.R. 6606; 14 Fla. L. Weekly Fed. S 26

    Argument Oral argument

    Decision Opinion Case history

    Prior Judgment for defendant, Fla. Cir. Ct.; matter certified to Florida Supreme Court, Fla. Ct. App.; aff'd in part, rev'd in part, sub nom. , 772 So. 2d 1273 (2000); granted, stay granted, 531 U.S. 1036 (2000).

    Holding

    In the circumstances of this case, any manual recount of votes seeking to meet the December 12 "safe harbor" deadline would be unconstitutional under the Equal Protection Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment. Florida Supreme Court reversed and remanded.

    Court membership Chief Justice William Rehnquist Associate Justices

    John P. Stevens · Sandra Day O'Connor

    Antonin Scalia · Anthony Kennedy

    David Souter · Clarence Thomas

    Ruth Bader Ginsburg · Stephen Breyer

    Case opinions

    Concurrence Rehnquist, joined by Scalia, Thomas

    Dissent Stevens, joined by Ginsburg, Breyer

    Dissent Souter, joined by Breyer; Stevens, Ginsburg (all but Part III)

    Dissent Ginsburg, joined by Stevens; Souter, Breyer (Part I)

    Dissent Breyer, joined by Stevens, Ginsburg (except Part I–A–1); Souter (Part I)

    Laws applied

    U.S. Const. art. II, amend. XIV; 3 U.S.C. § 5

    , 531 U.S. 98 (2000), was a decision of the United States Supreme Court on December 12, 2000, that settled a recount dispute in Florida's 2000 presidential election between George W. Bush and Al Gore. On December 8, the Florida Supreme Court had ordered a statewide recount of all undervotes, over 61,000 ballots that the vote tabulation machines had missed. The Bush campaign immediately asked the U.S. Supreme Court to stay the decision and halt the recount. Justice Antonin Scalia, convinced that all the manual recounts being performed in Florida's counties were illegitimate, urged his colleagues to grant the stay immediately.[1] On December 9, the five conservative justices on the Court granted the stay for Bush, with Scalia citing "irreparable harm" that could befall Bush, as the recounts would cast "a needless and unjustified cloud" over Bush's legitimacy. In dissent, Justice John Paul Stevens wrote that "counting every legally cast vote cannot constitute irreparable harm."[1] Oral arguments were scheduled for December 11.

    In a decision, the Court first ruled 7–2 (Justices Stevens and Ruth Bader Ginsburg dissenting), strictly on equal protection grounds, that the recount be stopped. Specifically, the use of different standards of counting in different counties violated the Equal Protection Clause of the U.S. Constitution; the case had also been argued on the basis of Article II jurisdictional grounds, which found favor with only Justices Scalia, Clarence Thomas, and William Rehnquist. Second, the Court ruled 5–4 against the remedy, proposed by Justices Stephen Breyer and David Souter, of sending the case back to Florida to complete the recount using a uniform statewide standard before the scheduled December 18 meeting of Florida's electors in Tallahassee.[1] The majority held that no alternative method could be established within the discretionary December 12 "safe harbor" deadline set by Title 3 of the United States Code (3 U.S.C.), § 5, which the Florida Supreme Court had stated that the Florida Legislature intended to meet.[2] That deadline arrived two hours after the release of the Court's decision. The Court, stating that not meeting the "safe harbor" deadline would therefore violate the Florida Election Code, rejected an extension of the deadline.

    The Supreme Court decision allowed the previous vote certification made by Florida Secretary of State, Katherine Harris, to stand for Bush, who thereby won Florida's 25 electoral votes. Florida's votes gave Bush, the Republican candidate, 271 electoral votes, one more than the 270 required to win the Electoral College. This meant the defeat of Democratic candidate Al Gore, who won 267 electoral votes but received 266, as a "faithless elector" from the District of Columbia abstained from voting. Media organizations later analyzed the ballots and found that, under specified criteria, the originally pursued recount of undervotes of several large counties would have confirmed a Bush victory, whereas a statewide recount would have revealed a Gore victory. Florida later retired the punch card voting machines that produced the ballots disputed in the case.[3][4][5]

    Contents

    1 Background

    2 Stay of the Florida recount

    3 Rapid developments

    4 Relevant law

    5 Issues considered by the Court

    5.1 Equal Protection Clause

    5.2 Article II 6 Decision

    6.1 Equal Protection Clause

    6.1.1 Remedy 6.2 Article II

    7 Scholarly analyses

    7.1 The critical remedial issue

    7.2 Limitation to present circumstances

    7.3 Accusation of partisanship or conflict of interest

    7.4 Recount by media organizations

    7.5 Critiques 8 Public reaction 9 See also

    Source : en.wikipedia.org

    Bush v. Gore

    Bush v. Gore, legal case, decided on December 12, 2000, in which the Supreme Court of the United States reversed an order by the Florida Supreme Court for a selective manual recount of that state’s U.S. presidential election ballots. The 5–4 per curiam (unsigned) decision effectively awarded Florida’s 25 Electoral College votes to Republican candidate George W. Bush, thereby ensuring his victory over Democratic candidate Al Gore. On the evening of election day—November 7, 2000—a clear winner of the presidential election had yet to emerge. Print and broadcast media cited often contradictory exit-polling numbers, and the races in Oregon and

    Bush v. Gore

    law case

    By The Editors of Encyclopaedia Britannica • Edit History

    U.S. presidential election of 2000

    See all media

    Date: December 12, 2000

    Location: United States

    See all related content →

    Top Questions

    What is Bush v. Gore?

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    Bush v. Gore, legal case, decided on December 12, 2000, in which the Supreme Court of the United States reversed an order by the Florida Supreme Court for a selective manual recount of that state’s U.S. presidential election ballots. The 5–4 per curiam (unsigned) decision effectively awarded Florida’s 25 Electoral College votes to Republican candidate George W. Bush, thereby ensuring his victory over Democratic candidate Al Gore.

    Background

    On the evening of election day—November 7, 2000—a clear winner of the presidential election had yet to emerge. Print and broadcast media cited often contradictory exit-polling numbers, and the races in Oregon and New Mexico would remain too close to call for some days. Ultimately, the contest focused on Florida. Networks initially projected Gore the winner in that state but later declared that Bush had opened an insurmountable lead. Gore called Bush to concede the election, but in the early hours of the following morning it became apparent that the Florida race was much closer than Gore’s staff had originally believed. Fewer than 600 votes separated the candidates, and that margin appeared to be narrowing. At about 3:00 AM Gore called a stunned Bush to retract his concession.

    BRITANNICA QUIZ

    U.S. Presidential Elections Quiz

    Which day of the week are U.S. presidential elections held? Who was George Washington’s running mate? Test your knowledge of U.S. presidential elections with this quiz.

    Under Florida election law, a machine recount of all votes cast was required because the margin of victory was less than 0.5 percent. In this race, the gap appeared to be roughly 0.01 percent. Both campaigns immediately dispatched teams of lawyers to Florida. Charges of conflict of interest were leveled by both sides—Bush’s brother Jeb was the governor of the state and Secretary of State Katherine Harris was cochair of Bush’s Florida campaign, while Florida Attorney General Bob Butterworth headed the Gore campaign. By November 10 the machine recount was complete, and Bush’s lead stood at 327 votes out of six million cast. As court challenges were issued over the legality of hand recounts in select counties, news stories were filled with the arcane vocabulary of the election judge. County officials tried to discern voter intent through a cloud of “hanging chads” (incompletely punched paper ballots) and “pregnant chads” (paper ballots that were dimpled, but not pierced, during the voting process), as well as “overvotes” (ballots that recorded multiple votes for the same office) and “undervotes” (ballots that recorded no vote for a given office). Also at issue was the so-called butterfly ballot design used in Palm Beach county, which caused confusion among some residents who had intended to vote for Gore—leading them to inadvertently cast some 3,400 votes for an ultraconservative third-party candidate, Pat Buchanan, which amounted to about 20 percent of his total votes statewide.

    sample “butterfly ballot” from Florida, 2000

    Sample ballot from Palm Beach county, Florida, for the 2000 U.S. presidential election.

    A tug-of-war ensued between Harris, who initially sought to certify the state’s election results on November 14, and the Florida Supreme Court, which ruled that hand recounts of questionable ballots should proceed in four counties and that the results must be included in the state’s final count. In the month following the election, some 50 individual suits were filed concerning the various counts, recounts, and certification deadlines. On December 8, in a 4–3 decision, the Florida Supreme Court ordered immediate manual recounts of undervotes for the office of president in all counties where such recounts had not already taken place.

    The Bush campaign immediately petitioned the U.S. Supreme Court for a stay of the recount order, which was granted on December 9. Treating the petition as a writ of certiorari (a formal request for review), the Court agreed to take up the case, Bush v. Gore.

    Source : www.britannica.com

    America in the Bush Years by LegitSwag69 Flashcards

    Study with Quizlet and memorize flashcards terms like The Emergency Economic Stabilization Act of 2008 was designed to help, How many electoral votes did George W. Bush win in the 2000 election?, Following the 2000 presidential election, the Bush campaign and more.

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    The Emergency Economic Stabilization Act of 2008 was designed to help

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    banks and other financial institutions.

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    271

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    The Emergency Economic Stabilization Act of 2008 was designed to help

    banks and other financial institutions.

    How many electoral votes did George W. Bush win in the 2000 election?

    271

    Following the 2000 presidential election, the Bush campaign

    appealed the Florida Supreme Court's decision to allow a hand recount.

    According to the immigration plan proposed by President Bush, people living in the United States illegally

    could stay in the country for a short time as guest workers.

    Which best describes a way in which No Child Left Behind was effective?

    It raised standards for all students.

    How did President Bush respond to Hurricane Katrina?

    He sent US troops to help distribute supplies and repair damage.

    A result of the US recession that began in 2008 was

    a global recession.

    President George W. Bush believed that the best way to improve the economy was by

    cutting taxes.

    Which best describes the role of the US Supreme Court in the 2000 presidential election?

    It stopped a recount in Florida, resulting in Bush's election.

    A problem that occurred in Florida during the 2000 election was that

    many ballots could not be read by machine.

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