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    LET 1 Health Study Cards

    MVHS 2020 - JROTC - LET 1 Health Study Cards - 1st Semester Finals Learn with flashcards, games, and more — for free.

    LET 1 Health Study Cards - 1st Semester Final Exams

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    1. If the federal government were to increase the driving age from 16 years of age to 18, which public health factor would improve?

    A. Decrease in the number of fatal car accidents.

    B. Childhood would be extended making teens more dependent on parents.

    C. Significant drop in teenage pregnancy.

    D. Car insurance costs will decrease, because less cars will need to be covered.

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    A

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    2. Mary has stopped hanging out with her friends, sleeping a lot and arguing more with her parents. What mental disorder might she be experiencing?

    A. personality disorder

    B. panic disorder

    C. depression disorder

    D. bipolar disorder

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    C

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    1/15 Created by DemonslayerKen

    MVHS 2020 - JROTC - LET 1 Health Study Cards - 1st Semester Finals

    Terms in this set (15)

    1. If the federal government were to increase the driving age from 16 years of age to 18, which public health factor would improve?

    A. Decrease in the number of fatal car accidents.

    B. Childhood would be extended making teens more dependent on parents.

    C. Significant drop in teenage pregnancy.

    D. Car insurance costs will decrease, because less cars will need to be covered.

    A

    2. Mary has stopped hanging out with her friends, sleeping a lot and arguing more with her parents. What mental disorder might she be experiencing?

    A. personality disorder

    B. panic disorder

    C. depression disorder

    D. bipolar disorder C

    3. Which is a negative example of the defense mechanism compensation?

    A. Developing your social skills, because you are naturally shy.

    B. Participating in after school activities to avoid going home.

    C. Using a secret identity to make fun of people online.

    D. Missing your academic classes to work on your artistic talents.

    D

    4. Aarron wants to create short-term goals to help him reach his long-term goal of being a fire fighter. Which short-term goal best supports Aarron's journey towards his long-term goal?

    A. Perform well in higher level science classes.

    B. Find a girlfriend to be in a committed relationship.

    C. Buy the newest workout video.

    D. Run for class president.

    A

    "Read the article and answer the following questions"

    (AZ MERIT) Four Personality Types

    Four Personality Types

    Human behavior is a complex subject to dwell on. There are times, when we feel we are similar to someone in more than one way, yet we are different. The main difference lies in our personality types. Most of us are a combination of 4 main personality types, yet there may be a personality type, which is more prominent than the other in us

    What are the 4 Personality Types?

    The birth of the theory of personality types is in psychology. This theory is also referred to as the four quadrant model. At this point, I would like to bring it to notice, that there are a number of names with which each of the personality may be referred to. It is important to note that understanding the personality types is not a simple task. Each of the personality types have their own strengths and weakness, therefore it is best not to categorize anyone of them better than the other.

    Analytical

    If you have to give the 4 personality types test to an analytical person, you will find him

    pondering over the questions. When they have to make their decisions, there will be no place for any emotions. Therefore, such people may often turn out to be hard task masters as well. They are perfectionists by nature and will always do any of the tasks they take up thoroughly and leave no stone unturned, so that the task it just perfect. More often than not, they can be very rigid and disciplined in their behavior, which often is demanding not only on themselves, but also on others around them. Therefore, when they are doing a particular task, it is not uncommon of this personality type to forget about themselves as well as the world around them.

    Driver

    As the name of personality type suggests, this is the 'doer' personality. The people of this personality type are passionate about their ambition, at the same time they are also known to instill it in others around them. The driver personality type is known to be very dominating. Hence, if you have to study the most charismatic political or military leaders, you will see that they had driver personality. In other words, they are the 'inborn' leaders and will often be seen taking charge of everything around them. Due to their driving personality, they often find it difficult to work with others. At the same time, they often do not take the perspective of the others, into consideration and they are determined and ensure everything happens exactly the way they have envisioned it to be.

    Expressive

    If in a gathering you come across a person, who is totally enjoying the social event, then it has to be the expressive personality type. They may often be considered to be very loud. They are known to make friends easily. Often it is seen, that these are the people, who become friends easily and at the same time, remain lifelong friends with others. It goes without saying, they are very good communicators. If there is an idea, you will see that it will be supported by this personality very enthusiastically. At times they may come across as unrealistic. You may find the people of this personality type day dreaming, but you cannot overlook their creative side either. If you come across someone, who is very sensitive, compassionate and thoughtful at the same time, you know it has to be the expressive personality type. These people may not always be able to reach their destination on time and may be forgetful as well. You will see that these people may lose interest in something, they have taken up rather enthusiastically very

    Source : quizlet.com

    Seven Dimensions of Wellness

    Seven Dimensions of Wellness

    Wellness is the pursuit of continued growth and balance in the seven dimensions of wellness. Many people think about "wellness" in terms of physical health only. The word invokes thoughts of nutrition, exercise, weight management, blood pressure, etc. Wellness, however, is much more than physical health. Wellness is a full integration of physical, mental and spiritual well-being. It is a complex interaction that leads to quality of life.

    Wellness is commonly viewed as having seven dimensions. Each dimension contributes to our own sense of wellness or quality of life, and each affects and overlaps the others. At times one may be more prominent than others, but neglect of any one dimension for any length of time has adverse effects on overall health.

    The Seven Dimensions of Wellness

    Physical Emotional Intellectual Social Spiritual Environmental Occupational

    Physical Dimension

    Physical wellness encompasses a variety of healthy behaviors including adequate exercise, proper nutrition and abstaining from harmful habits such as drug use and alcohol abuse. It means learning about and identifying symptoms of disease, getting regular medical checkups, and protecting yourself from injuries and harm. Developing such healthy habits today will not only add years to your life but will enhance the enjoyment and quality of those years.

    Tips for optimal physical wellness:

    Exercise daily Get adequate rest

    Use seat belts, helmets, and other protective equipment

    Learn to recognize early signs of illness

    Eat a variety of healthy foods

    Control your meal portions

    Stop smoking and protect yourself against second-hand smoke

    Use alcohol in moderation, if at all

    Emotional Dimension

    Emotional wellness is a dynamic state that fluctuates frequently with your other six dimensions of wellness. Being emotionally well is typically defined as possessing the ability to feel and express human emotions such as happiness, sadness and anger. It means having the ability to love and be loved and achieving a sense of fulfillment in life. Emotional wellness encompasses optimism, self-esteem, self-acceptance and the ability to share feelings.

    Tips for optimal emotional wellness:

    Tune-in to your thoughts and feelings

    Cultivate an optimistic attitude

    Seek and provide support

    Learn time management skills

    Practice stress management techniques

    Accept and forgive yourself

    Intellectual Dimension

    The intellectual dimension encourages creative, stimulating mental activities. Our minds need to be continually inspired and exercised just as our bodies do. People who possess a high level of intellectual wellness have an active mind and continue to learn. An intellectually well person uses the resources available to expand one's knowledge and improve skills. Keeping up-to-date on current events and participating in activities that arouse our minds are also important.

    Tips and suggestions for optimal intellectual wellness include:

    Take a course or workshop

    Learn (or perfect) a foreign language

    Seek out people who challenge you intellectually

    Read

    Learn to appreciate art

    Social Dimension

    Social wellness refers to our ability to interact successfully in our global community and to live up to the expectations and demands of our personal roles. This means learning good communication skills, developing intimacy with others, and creating a support network of friends and family members.

    Social wellness includes showing respect for others and yourself. Contributing to your community and to the world builds a sense of belonging.

    Tips and suggestions for optimal social wellness include:

    Cultivate healthy relationships

    Get involved

    Contribute to your community

    Share your talents and skills

    Communicate your thoughts, feelings and ideas

    Spiritual Dimension

    Spiritual wellness involves possessing a set of guiding beliefs, principles, or values that help give direction to one's life. It encompasses a high level of faith, hope and commitment to your individual beliefs that provide a sense of meaning and purpose. It is willingness to seek meaning and purpose in human existence, to question everything and to appreciate the things which cannot be readily explained or understood.

    A spiritually well person seeks harmony between what lies within as well as the forces outside.

    Tips and suggestions for optimal spiritual wellness:

    Explore your spiritual core

    Spend time alone/meditate regularly

    Be inquisitive and curious

    Be fully present in everything you do

    Listen with your heart and live by your principles

    Allow yourself and those around you the freedom to be who they are

    See opportunities for growth in the challenges life brings you

    Environmental Wellness

    Environmental wellness is an awareness of the unstable state of the earth and the effects of your daily habits on the physical environment. It consists of maintaining a way of life that maximizes harmony with the earth and minimizes harm to the environment. It includes being involved in socially responsible activities to protect the environment.

    Tips and suggestions for optimal environmental wellness:

    Stop your junk mail

    Source : www.grcc.edu

    Social Relationships and Health: A Flashpoint for Health Policy

    Social relationships—both quantity and quality—affect mental health, health behavior, physical health, and mortality risk. Sociologists have played a central role in establishing the link between social relationships and health outcomes, ...

    J Health Soc Behav. Author manuscript; available in PMC 2011 Aug 4.

    Published in final edited form as:

    J Health Soc Behav. 2010; 51(Suppl): S54–S66.

    doi: 10.1177/0022146510383501

    PMCID: PMC3150158

    NIHMSID: NIHMS300162

    PMID: 20943583

    Social Relationships and Health: A Flashpoint for Health Policy

    Debra Umberson1 and Jennifer Karas Montez1

    Author information Copyright and License information Disclaimer

    The publisher's final edited version of this article is available at J Health Soc Behav

    See other articles in PMC that cite the published article.

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    Abstract

    Social relationships—both quantity and quality—affect mental health, health behavior, physical health, and mortality risk. Sociologists have played a central role in establishing the link between social relationships and health outcomes, identifying explanations for this link, and discovering social variation (e.g., by gender and race) at the population level. Studies show that social relationships have short- and long-term effects on health, for better and for worse, and that these effects emerge in childhood and cascade throughout life to foster cumulative advantage or disadvantage in health. This article describes key research themes in the study of social relationships and health, and it highlights policy implications suggested by this research.

    Keywords: relationships, social support, social integration, stress, cumulative disadvantage

    Captors use social isolation to torture prisoners of war—to drastic effect. Social isolation of otherwise healthy, well-functioning individuals eventually results in psychological and physical disintegration, and even death. Over the past few decades, social scientists have gone beyond evidence of extreme social deprivation to demonstrate a clear link between social relationships and health in the general population. Adults who are more socially connected are healthier and live longer than their more isolated peers. This article describes major findings in the study of social relationships and health, and how that knowledge might be translated into policy that promotes population health. Key research findings include: (1) social relationships have significant effects on health; (2) social relationships affect health through behavioral, psychosocial, and physiological pathways; (3) relationships have costs and benefits for health; (4) relationships shape health outcomes throughout the life course and have a cumulative impact on health over time; and (5) the costs and benefits of social relationships are not distributed equally in the population.

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    WHAT DO WE MEAN BY “SOCIAL RELATIONSHIPS”?

    Social scientists have studied several distinct features of social connection offered by relationships (Smith and Christakis 2008). Social isolation refers to the relative absence of social relationships. Social integration refers to overall level of involvement with informal social relationships, such as having a spouse, and with formal social relationships, such as those with religious institutions and volunteer organizations. Quality of relationships includes positive aspects of relationships, such as emotional support provided by significant others, and strained aspects of relationships, such as conflict and stress. Social networks refer to the web of social relationships surrounding an individual, in particular, structural features, such as the type and strength of each social relationship. Each of these aspects of social relationships affects health. We discuss the broad effects of these features of relationships for health, and, for ease of discussion, we use the terms “social relationships” and “social ties” interchangeably throughout this article.

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    SOCIAL RELATIONSHIPS BENEFIT HEALTH

    Many types of scientific evidence show that involvement in social relationships benefits health. The most striking evidence comes from prospective studies of mortality across industrialized nations. These studies consistently show that individuals with the lowest level of involvement in social relationships are more likely to die than those with greater involvement (House, Landis, and Umberson 1988). For example, Berkman and Syme (1979) showed that the risk of death among men and women with the fewest social ties was more than twice as high as the risk for adults with the most social ties. Moreover, this finding held even when socioeconomic status, health behaviors, and other variables that might influence mortality, were taken into account. Social ties also reduce mortality risk among adults with documented medical conditions. For instance, Brummett and colleagues (2001) found that, among adults with coronary artery disease, the socially isolated had a risk of subsequent cardiac death 2.4 times greater than their more socially connected peers.

    In addition to mortality, involvement in social relationships has been associated with specific health conditions as well as biological markers indicating risk of preclinical conditions. Several recent review articles provide consistent and compelling evidence linking a low quantity or quality of social ties with a host of conditions, including development and progression of cardiovascular disease, recurrent myocardial infarction, atherosclerosis, autonomic dysregulation, high blood pressure, cancer and delayed cancer recovery, and slower wound healing (Ertel, Glymour, and Berkman 2009; Everson-Rose and Lewis 2005; Robles and Kiecolt-Glaser 2003; Uchino 2006). Poor quality and low quantity of social ties have also been associated with inflammatory biomarkers and impaired immune function, factors associated with adverse health outcomes and mortality (Kiecolt-Glaser et al. 2002; Robles and Kiecolt-Glaser 2003). Marriage is perhaps the most studied social tie. Recent work shows that marital history over the life course shapes a range of health outcomes, including cardiovascular disease, chronic conditions, mobility limitations, self-rated health, and depressive symptoms (Hughes and Waite 2009; Zhang and Hayward 2006).

    Source : www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov

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