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    which are important to consider when identifying the purpose of a speech? select 4 options. cultural context expert opinion central ideas language audience

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    Which are important to consider when identifying the purpose of a speech? Select 4 options. cultural context expert opinion central ideas language audience

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    Which are important to consider when identifying the purpose of a speech? Select 4 options.

    cultural context expert opinion central ideas language audience

    Middle School English

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    Answer: cultural context, central ideas, language, audience.Explanation:The speaker should determine the central ideas which he/she wants to address in the speech. These ideas should be expressed in a simple and concise manner.Cultural context and the audience are closely related elements - the speaker should definitely take into consideration which people are going to listen to his/her speech, and what are the characteristics of their culture. Taking these elements into account will help the speaker connect with the audience.Finally, language itself is a means used to connect with the people in the audience. The use of persuasive techniques and rhetoric devices plays a crucial role in any speech. Depending on the purpose of the speech, as well as the target group (people's age, occupation, etc), type of language used also varies.

    answer from clementine18

    Answer:LanguageAudienceCentral ideasCultural contextExplanation: Language- helps the speaker connect with the audience. Certain language is used with a certain demographic.Audience- Every speaker must have an audience that share similar characteristics. These are the people who will receive your message.Central ideas- This is the purpose or idea of the speech. Example,a college professor gives a speech about importance of research, the ideas that will be included are research purposes, types of research etc.Cultural context- Understanding the context of your speech is important in helping you relate to the audience.

    answer from 0fxJay

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    Rhetoric in Reagan's Address at Moscow State University Flashcards

    Start studying Rhetoric in Reagan's Address at Moscow State University. Learn vocabulary, terms, and more with flashcards, games, and other study tools.

    Rhetoric in Reagan's Address at Moscow State University

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    Which are important to consider when identifying the purpose of a speech? Check all that apply.

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    a. cultural context c. central ideas d. language e. audience

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    Which line from President Reagan's Address at Moscow State University best substantiates his opinion that small businesses are moving the technological revolution?

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    a. One of the largest personal computer firms in the United States was started by two college students, no older than you, in the garage behind their home.

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    Terms in this set (16)

    Which are important to consider when identifying the purpose of a speech? Check all that apply.

    a. cultural context c. central ideas d. language e. audience

    Which line from President Reagan's Address at Moscow State University best substantiates his opinion that small businesses are moving the technological revolution?

    a. One of the largest personal computer firms in the United States was started by two college students, no older than you, in the garage behind their home.

    But progress is not foreordained. The key is freedom—freedom of thought, freedom of information, freedom of communication.

    Which is true of these lines?

    a. Repetition is used to emphasize the importance of freedom.

    Freedom, it has been said, makes people selfish and materialistic, but Americans are one of the most religious peoples on Earth. Because they know that liberty, just as life itself, is not earned but a gift from God, they seek to share that gift with the world. "Reason and experience," said George Washington in his farewell address, "both forbid us to expect that national morality can prevail in exclusion of religious principle. And it is substantially true, that virtue or morality is a necessary spring of popular government."

    Check all that apply.

    The underlined words in this excerpt are

    a. an example of procatalepsis.

    c. used by Reagan to acknowledge an opposing view.

    e. followed by a counterargument proving Reagan's point.

    A substantiated opinion is best supported by

    c. expert opinions

    But progress is not foreordained. The key is freedom—freedom of thought, freedom of information, freedom of communication. The renowned scientist, scholar, and founding father of this university, Mikhail Lomonosov, knew that. "It is common knowledge," he said, "that the achievements of science are considerable and rapid, particularly once the yoke of slavery is cast off and replaced by the freedom of philosophy." You know, one of the first contacts between your country and mine took place between Russian and American explorers. The Americans were members of Cook's last voyage on an expedition searching for an Arctic passage; on the island of Unalaska, they came upon the Russians, who took them in, and together with the native inhabitants, held a prayer service on the ice.

    In this excerpt, President Reagan expresses his opinion that the key to progress is freedom. This is

    a. a substantiated opinion because Reagan quotes an expert.

    Which line from President Reagan's Address at Moscow State University shows that one purpose of the speech was to build connections between the Soviet Union and the US?

    c. Our ties to you are more than ones of good feeling; they're ties of kinship.

    A rhetorical device uses language to _____________

    persuade

    One purpose of President Reagan's Address at Moscow State University was to

    d. persuade listeners to embrace democratic freedoms.

    Which lines from President Reagan's Address at Moscow State University contain an opinion? Check all that apply.

    c. But progress is not foreordained. The key is freedom—freedom of thought, freedom of information

    e. Perhaps most exciting are the winds of change that are blowing over the People's Republic of China

    f. And that's why it's so hard for government planners, no matter how sophisticated, to ever substitute for millions of individuals

    Go into any schoolroom, and there you will see children being taught . . . certain unalienable rights—among them life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.

    What is the purpose of this line?

    d. to persuade listeners of the importance of freedom

    The explorers of the modern era are the entrepreneurs, men with vision, with the courage to take risks and faith enough to brave the unknown. These entrepreneurs and their small enterprises are responsible for almost all the economic growth in the United States. They are the prime movers of the technological revolution. In fact, one of the largest personal computer firms in the United States was started by two college students, no older than you, in the garage behind their home. Some people, even in my own country, look at the riot of experiment that is the free market and see only waste. What of all the entrepreneurs that fail? Well, many do, particularly the successful ones; often several times. And if you ask them the secret of their success, they'll tell you it's all that they learned in their struggles along the way; yes, it's what they learned from failing. Like an athlete in competition or a scholar in pursuit of the truth, experience is the greatest teacher.

    Source : quizlet.com

    6.1 General Purposes of Speaking – Stand up, Speak out

    6.1 GENERAL PURPOSES OF SPEAKING

    Learning Objectives

    Differentiate among the three types of general speech purposes.

    Examine the basics of informative speech topics and some common forms of informative speeches.

    Examine the basics of persuasive speech topics and some common forms of persuasive speeches.

    Examine the basics of entertaining speech topics and some common forms of entertaining speeches.

    Jeffrey Beall – Search! – CC BY-ND 2.0.

    What do you think of when you hear the word “purpose”? Technically speaking, a purpose can be defined as why something exists, how we use an object, or why we make something. For the purposes of public speaking, all three can be applicable. For example, when we talk about a speech’s purpose, we can question why a specific speech was given; we can question how we are supposed to use the information within a speech; and we can question why we are personally creating a speech. For this specific chapter, we are more interested in that last aspect of the definition of the word “purpose”: why we give speeches.

    Ever since scholars started writing about public speaking as a distinct phenomenon, there have been a range of different systems created to classify the types of speeches people may give. Aristotle talked about three speech purposes: deliberative (political speech), forensic (courtroom speech), and epideictic (speech of praise or blame). Cicero also talked about three purposes: judicial (courtroom speech), deliberative (political speech), and demonstrative (ceremonial speech—similar to Aristotle’s epideictic). A little more recently, St. Augustine of Hippo also wrote about three specific speech purposes: to teach (provide people with information), to delight (entertain people or show people false ideas), and to sway (persuade people to a religious ideology). All these systems of identifying public speeches have been attempts at helping people determine the general purpose of their speech. A general purpose refers to the broad goal in creating and delivering a speech.

    These typologies or classification systems of public speeches serve to demonstrate that general speech purposes have remained pretty consistent throughout the history of public speaking. Modern public speaking scholars typically use a classification system of three general purposes: to inform, to persuade, and to entertain.

    To Inform

    The first general purpose that some people have for giving speeches is to inform. Simply put, this is about helping audience members acquire information that they do not already possess. Audience members can then use this information to understand something (e.g., speech on a new technology, speech on a new virus) or to perform a new task or improve their skills (e.g., how to swing a golf club, how to assemble a layer cake). The most important characteristic of informative topics is that the goal is to gain knowledge. Notice that the goal is not to encourage people to use that knowledge in any specific way. When a speaker starts encouraging people to use knowledge in a specific way, he or she is no longer informing but is persuading.

    Let’s look at a real example of how an individual can accidentally go from informing to persuading. Let’s say you are assigned to inform an audience about a new vaccination program. In an informative speech, the purpose of the speech is to explain to your audience what the program is and how it works. If, however, you start encouraging your audience to participate in the vaccination program, you are no longer informing them about the program but rather persuading them to become involved in the program. One of the most common mistakes new public speaking students make is to blur the line between informing and persuading.

    Why We Share Knowledge

    Knowledge sharing is the process of delivering information, skills, or expertise in some form to people who could benefit from it. In fact, understanding and exchanging knowledge is so important that an entire field of study, called knowledge management, has been created to help people (especially businesses) become more effective at harnessing and exchanging knowledge. In the professional world, sharing knowledge is becoming increasingly important. Every year, millions of people attend some kind of knowledge sharing conference or convention in hopes of learning new information or skills that will help them in their personal or professional lives (Atwood, 2009).

    People are motivated to share their knowledge with other people for a variety of reasons (Hendriks, 1999). For some, the personal sense of achievement or of responsibility drives them to share their knowledge (internal motivational factors). Others are driven to share knowledge because of the desire for recognition or the possibility of job enhancement (external motivational factors). Knowledge sharing is an important part of every society, so learning how to deliver informative speeches is a valuable skill.

    Common Types of Informative Topics

    O’Hair, Stewart, and Rubenstein identified six general types of informative speech topics: objects, people, events, concepts, processes, and issues (O’Hair, et al., 2007). The first type of informative speech relates to objects, which can include how objects are designed, how they function, and what they mean. For example, a student of one of our coauthors gave a speech on the design of corsets, using a mannequin to demonstrate how corsets were placed on women and the amount of force necessary to lace one up.

    Source : open.lib.umn.edu

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