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    which answer gives both a positive impact and a negative impact associated with the effects of nitrogen- and phosphorus-enhanced fertilizers?

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    Click here πŸ‘† to get an answer to your question ✍️ Which answer gives both a positive impact and a negative impact that are associated with the effects of nitro…

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    Which answer gives both a positive impact and a negative impact that are associated with the effects of nitrogen- and phosphorus-enhanced fertilizers? increased algal blooms and damage to drinking water increased plant growth and damage to drinking water increase in denitrifying bacteria and increase in plant growth increase in a limiting resource and increase in denitrifying bacteria

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    The point which states that increased plant growth and damage to drinking water depicts both the negative as well as positive impact with regards to nitrogen- and phosphorus-enhanced fertilizers.

    Explanation:

    The farmers use nitrogen- and phosphorus-enhanced fertilizers to promote high growth in plants.

    This combination of fertilizers facilitates development of plant in all aspects including root, stem, flower and fruits. This is considered as positive impact.  

    On the other hand, these types of fertilizer are highly insoluble and remains in the farm soil are more period of time.

    Due to sudden pour or wash off, these fertilizers are washed away from the field and is deposited in the drinking water which damages it and makes it unfit for drinking purpose. This is considered as negative impact.

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    Answer

    Ambitious 26 answers 27.6K people helped

    Answer: B.  Explanation:

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    longtinpaige asked 10/15/2018

    WILL GIVE BRAINIEST!!!!! Which answer gives both is a positive impact in a negative impact that are associated with the effects of a nitrogen and phosphorus enhanced fertilizers? β€”β€”β€”β€”β€”β€”β€”β€”β€”β€”β€”β€”β€”β€”β€”β€”β€”β€”β€”β€”β€”β€”β€”β€”β€”β€”β€”β€”β€”β€”β€”β€”β€”β€”β€”β€”β€”β€”β€”β€”β€”β€”β€”β€”β€”β€” 1)increase algal blooms and damage to drinking water 2)increase plant growth and damage to drinking water 3)increase inn denitrifying bacteria and increase in plant growth 4)increase in limiting resource and increase in denitrifying bacteria

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    Which of these is a negative effect of using too much water for the irrigation of crops? A. depletion of oxygen in the water B. increased deposition of sediments upstream C. slowed erosion due to the slowing of water flow D. harming the plants and animals in river ecosystems

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    Negative effects of nitrogen override positive effects of phosphorus on grassland legumes worldwide

    Predicting the effects of anthropogenic nutrient enrichment on plant communities is critical for managing implications for biodiversity and ecosystem ...

    Research Article Biological Sciences Share on

    Negative effects of nitrogen override positive effects of phosphorus on grassland legumes worldwide

    Pedro M. Tognetti https://orcid.org/0000-0001-7358-1334 [email protected], Suzanne M. Prober [email protected], Selene BΓ‘ez, +25 , Enrique J. Chaneton, Jennifer Firn https://orcid.org/0000-0001-6026-8912, Anita C. Risch, Martin Schuetz, Anna K. Simonsen, Laura Yahdjian https://orcid.org/0000-0002-9635-1221, Elizabeth T. Borer https://orcid.org/0000-0003-2259-5853, Eric W. Seabloom https://orcid.org/0000-0001-6780-9259, Carlos Alberto Arnillas https://orcid.org/0000-0003-1506-9978, Jonathan D. Bakker, Cynthia S. Brown https://orcid.org/0000-0001-8486-7119, Marc W. Cadotte https://orcid.org/0000-0002-5816-7693, Maria C. Caldeira https://orcid.org/0000-0002-3586-8526, Pedro Daleo https://orcid.org/0000-0001-9759-1203, John M. Dwyer https://orcid.org/0000-0001-7389-5528, Philip A. Fay, Laureano A. Gherardi https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5743-1096, Nicole Hagenah, Yann Hautier, Kimberly J. Komatsu https://orcid.org/0000-0001-7056-4547, Rebecca L. McCulley, Jodi N. Price https://orcid.org/0000-0003-2899-7693, Rachel J. Standish https://orcid.org/0000-0001-8118-1904, Carly J. Stevens, Peter D. Wragg https://orcid.org/0000-0003-2361-4286, and Mahesh Sankaran -25Authors Info & Affiliations

    Edited by Peter M. Vitousek, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, and approved May 3, 2021 (received for review November 26, 2020)

    July 6, 2021

    118 (28) e2023718118

    https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.2023718118

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    Significance

    Predicting the effects of anthropogenic nutrient enrichment on plant communities is critical for managing implications for biodiversity and ecosystem services. Plant functional types that fix atmospheric nitrogen (e.g., legumes) may be at particular risk of nutrient-driven global decline, yet global-scale evidence is lacking. Using an experiment in 45 grasslands across six continents, we showed that legume cover, richness, and biomass declined substantially with nitrogen additions. Although legumes benefited from phosphorus, potassium, and other nutrients, these nutrients did not ameliorate nitrogen-induced legume decline. Given global trends in anthropogenic nutrient enrichment, our results indicate the potential for global decline in grassland legumes, with likely consequences for biodiversity, food webs, soil health, and genetic improvement of protein-rich plant species for food production.

    Abstract

    Anthropogenic nutrient enrichment is driving global biodiversity decline and modifying ecosystem functions. Theory suggests that plant functional types that fix atmospheric nitrogen have a competitive advantage in nitrogen-poor soils, but lose this advantage with increasing nitrogen supply. By contrast, the addition of phosphorus, potassium, and other nutrients may benefit such species in low-nutrient environments by enhancing their nitrogen-fixing capacity. We present a global-scale experiment confirming these predictions for nitrogen-fixing legumes (Fabaceae) across 45 grasslands on six continents. Nitrogen addition reduced legume cover, richness, and biomass, particularly in nitrogen-poor soils, while cover of non–nitrogen-fixing plants increased. The addition of phosphorous, potassium, and other nutrients enhanced legume abundance, but did not mitigate the negative effects of nitrogen addition. Increasing nitrogen supply thus has the potential to decrease the diversity and abundance of grassland legumes worldwide regardless of the availability of other nutrients, with consequences for biodiversity, food webs, ecosystem resilience, and genetic improvement of protein-rich agricultural plant species.

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    MANAGE ALERTS

    Anthropogenic enrichment of nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), and other nutrients from fertilizers and fossil fuel combustion is transforming natural ecosystems worldwide (1–5), leading to increased terrestrial plant productivity (6, 7) and loss of biodiversity (8, 9). Resource competition theory proposes that the capacity of species to persist at low levels of a limiting resource is a key mechanism underpinning competitive success. Consequently, plant functional types with specialized nutrient acquisition strategies are expected to have a competitive advantage in nutrient-limited environments but also to be especially vulnerable to nutrient enrichment (10–13).

    Legumes (Fabaceae) are one of the largest families of flowering plants, contributing over 650 genera and 19,000 taxa to global plant diversity (14). This diversity is important for biodiversity conservation and for genetic improvement of protein-rich crops and forage species for sustainable livestock production (15–17). Furthermore, the ability to fix atmospheric N2 is one of the most important plant functional traits for influencing ecosystem processes, conferring N-fixing legumes with a disproportionately important role in ecosystem functioning (18, 19). For example, litter produced by legumes is nitrogen-rich and more easily decomposed by soil microorganisms, leading to flow on effects to higher trophic levels, including increased complexity of food webs and resistance of soil biophysical and chemical properties to ecosystem disturbance (20). As the success of legumes often arises from this capacity for symbiotic fixation of atmospheric N2 in N-limited environments (21, 22), atmospheric N-deposition and other pathways of anthropogenic N supply are expected to drastically reduce their competitive advantage in plant communities (1, 5, 11, 23). This is especially the case for obligate-N-fixers that cannot down-regulate N-fixation (24, 25) and hence at higher soil N are disadvantaged by the high energetic cost of N-fixation (26).

    Source : www.pnas.org

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