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    where did the medici family build the boboli gardens?

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    Gardens in Tuscany

    ABBADIA D'OMBRONE

    ABBAZIA DI VALLOMBROSA

    VILLA ARCENO

    BARDINI GARDEN IN FLORENCE

    BERNARD BERENSON BOBOLI'S GARDENS

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    THE MEDICI VILLA AT CAREGGI

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    IL VITTORIALE DEGLI ITALIANI

    Isolotto's Bacin, on the right Perseus on Horseback

    I Giardini di Boboli (Boboli's Gardens)

    Italian art city par excellence, Florence is also a surprisingly green metropolis, home to numerous splendid gardens.

    Annexed to the Palazzo Pitti Museum complex, the Boboli Garden is one of the most famous formal 16th century Italian gardens and a veritable open air museum, with a unique architectural plan and dozens of statues hiding amidst the multicoloured plants. The garden has a triangular plan, with two, steeply sloping orthogonal axes, which terminate in the Bacino di Nettuno (fountain of Neptune).

    The creation of artificial grottoes was an introduction of Mannerist style to Italian, and then to French, gardens of the mid 16th century. Two famous grottoes in the Boboli Gardens of Palazzo Pitti were begun by Vasari and completed by Ammanati and Buontalenti between 1583 and 1593. The lemonscent is always in the air, as the Boboli gardens has a great collection of old lemonplants in terracotta pots. In the winter the lemonplants are brought to the 'limonaia' where they are protected against the winter cold.

    The Boboli gardens lie directly behind the Pitti Palace and were created for the Medici when they moved in during 1550. They really are spectacular because of the mixture of art and gardens sitting together, side by side, in harmony.

    In 1766 the gardens were opened to the public and in 1992 a small entrance fee was introduced but this is so small as to be negligible. It is a haven of peace and quiet in a very noisy city and the views over Florence and the Tuscan countryside are breathtaking.

    The gardens were originally designed by Niccolò Pericoli but after his death a variety of people had a hand in completing the gardens including Davide Fortini, Giorgio Vasari and Bartolomeo Ammannati. Despite this, the original design was followed and the gardens have pretty much remained the same ever since.

    The entrance to the gardens leads directly to the amphitheatre with the fountain designed by Giambologna. This was where the first ever opera performance was held and it is quite an impressive sight.

    Grotta del Buontalenti

    Boboli Gardens are still distinguished by a number of important statues by Giambologna, in particular the Fontana dell'Oceano created in 1574 – 7 but moved to the Isolotto by Parigi. Other famous sculptures include the Nano Morgante by Valerio Cioli (1529 – 99), a naked fat dwarf riding a tortoise, supposedly an allegory of laziness and wisdom.

    La Fontana del Bacchino

    Its creation and development spans four hundred years between the 15th and 19th centuries. The gardens laid out behind Santa Felicita in Oltrarno by the Borgolo family, the name from which Boboli is thought to derive, were bought in 1418 by Luca Pitti. In the mid-15th century Pitti commissioned the construction of a grand palace, which is believed to have been designed by Luca Fancelli,with the help of his master Filippo Brunelleschi. In 1549 the property was bought by Cosimo I’s wife Eleonora da Toledo, and became the Medici family’s city residence. Niccolò Tribolo was engaged to design the gardens, and it is probably he who excavated the hill to create the Amphitheatre, a highly successful creation in both perspective and functional terms.It created the garden’s first perspective vista (running north-west/south-east), a prospect that began at the main entrance to the palace and continued across to the hill and all the way to Forte Belvedere. When Tribolo died, work continued under the direction of Bartolomeo Ammannati (15111592) and subsequently Bernardo Buontalenti (1555-1635).In the 17th century Giulio Parigi (1568-1635) and his son Alfonso devised the second perspective vista,which was to run at right angles to the first,in the direction of Porta Romana.The triangular garden has two orthogonal axes which meet roughly at the Fountain-Basin of Neptune; the steeply sloping avenues run across the central walk and are organised as a series of terraces with smaller avenues, footpaths, sculptures or landscaping elements leading to specific garden features:glades,enclosed gardens or buildings.The visit begins at the fountain featuring the statue of a dwarf riding a tortoise,sculpted in 1560 by Valerio Cigoli (1529-1599). Opposite the entrance is the Buontalenti Grotto,a series of three communicating chambers: the first, with stuccowork decorations, is characterised by pastoral scenes executed by Bernardino Poccetti (1542-1612); the second contains a marble statue group depicting the abduction of Helen by Paris, sculpted by Vincenzo Rossi da Fiesole (1525-1587); the third, frescoed by Poccianti,has a fine fountain by Giambologna (1529-1608) depicting Venus emerging from the water after bathing.Beyond the statues of the Dacian Prisoners, the route through the gardens continues and,next to the rising avenue,passes the Jupiter Garden with a seated statue of Jupiter and the adjoining Madama Garden.The avenue leads up to the grand Amphitheatre and the Artichoke Fountain, whose large octagonal basin is decorated with numerous statues and crowned by a bronze artichoke by Francesco Susini. The great horseshoe-shaped sweep of the amphitheatre was possibly originally conceived as a piece of landscaping, and in 1599 was embellished with steps (still in existence) topped by aedicules with niches containing bronze statues and terracotta urns. The granite basin is taken from the Baths of Caracalla, while the obelisk, which arrived in Rome in 30 BC from Egypt, was brought to Boboli in 1790 by Pierre Léopold,who commissioned Gaspero Paoletti (1727-1813) to design a plinth adorned with bronze tortoises; it was erected at the centre of the amphitheatre in 1841. The main avenue leads to the Bacino di Nettuno reached by a dual ramp, at the beginning of which stand three Roman statues.The basin is dominated by the bronze statue of Neptune by Lorenzi (1534-1583):the ancient god of the sea stands on a rocky spur decorated with naiads and tritons, at the centre of a large fountain-basin surrounded by stepped turfed terraces,at the top of which, among holm-oaks, stands the colossal statue of Abundance,sculpted in around 1636 by Pietro Tacca. Here, at the point where the ancient city walls once stood,the original garden came to an end. On a cavaliere, or rampart of the walls built by Michelangelo in 1529,stands the Giardino del Cavaliere, reached by a double staircase, at either side of which stand two statues of the Muses.The niches contain statues of Flora and Jupiter, early works by Giovanni Caccini.At the centre of the garden, which is bordered by low box hedges,stands a fountain with a central marble cherub. This ornamental work is known as the “monkey fountain”because of the three bronze primates at its base. Underneath the Casino del Cavaliere building is a large water storage area known as the trout reservoir, from which the pipes that supply water to the entire garden lead off.To the east of the Amphitheatre, near the Statue of Abundance is the Kaffeehause, a Rococo-style pavilion by Zanobi del Rosso, with a characteristic glazed dome.This small building stands on a stepped lawn at the centre of which is the 17th-century Ganymede Fountain. The Kaffeehause can be considered to be the visual focal point of the park’s second main thoroughfare, the steeply descending Viottolone. The beginning of this avenue is marked by two statues known as the “Greek Tyrannicides” and its route is lined on both sides by ancient statues,mainly Roman or 18th century.Three smaller avenues leading off at right angles from the Viottolone divide the garden, which has seen a number of changes over the centuries, including the laying out of the Labirinto,the maze which was destroyed in 1832 (except for the central basin) to make way for a new coach road.The first side avenue consists of a pergola of holmoaks with low stone seats at the sides; at the junction with the Viottolone are four marble statues by Giovanni Caccini: Prudence, Aesculapius,Autumn and Summer; the walk terminates on the right-hand side with the Fountain of Oceanus. The second branching alley ends at the city walls with a Bust of Jupiter (attributed to Giambologna), while the point where it crosses the Viottolone is marked by three Roman statues (the Senator, Bacchus and the Bald Philosopher) and one from the 18th century. Further down, the junction with the third side avenue has six statues:Aesculapius,Andromeda, a Nymph, Modesty and two groups with two peasant girls,known as the Gioco dello Scaccomazzone and the Gioco della Pentolaccia.At the end of the Viottolone the steep perspective ends at the elliptical Vasca dell’Isola,constructed by Parigi’s family in 1618.12-metre-high espaliers of ilex form the backdrop to numerous stone and marble statues with mythological, historical or popular themes,occupied almost entirely by a large basin connected to the ground by two walkways, entered through a wrought-iron gate. At the centre of the pool stands the Fountain of Oceanus, a copy of the original work by Giambologna. It consists of a statue of Neptune over statues representing the Nile, the Ganges and the Euphrates pouring their waters into the Ocean, a pool of Elba granite,the base of which is embellished by bas-reliefs. Emerging from the water of the island are the marble groups of Perseus on horseback and of Andromeda,whose ankles are chained to the rock.In line with the main avenue are the Fountain of the Harpies and the Fountain of the Putti. The Viottolone – after a division by a side avenue with four ancient statues of Serapis,Jupiter,a Male God and the Emperor Claudius – leads to the hemicyclical Prato delle Colonne,a lawn surrounded by a tall hedge with twelve niches containing large busts and with two red granite columns at the centre supporting marble vases. The Porta Romana gateway stands in an open space containing various stone groups.

    Source : www.travelingintuscany.com

    History

    Directly behind Pitti Palace are the marvellous Boboli Gardens. The Medici family established the layout of the gardensand the subsequent Habsburg-Lorraine and Savoy dynasties further developed the layout, extending the boundaries that flank the ancient city walls until Porta Romana. Today the garden is part of the Uffizi Galleries.

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    History | Boboli Gardens

    Begun in 1549 and designed by Niccolò Pericoli, known as Tribolo, for Duchess Eleonora of Toledo, the Boboli Gardens are one of the most important examples of an Italian garden. On a hillside behind the Palace, the Gardens are arranged geometrically with a symmetrical, regular positioning of trees and flowerbeds. It was decided to begin the planting of hedges and trees, rare and wild plants and the construction of the fountains immediately. These innovative ideas would make Boboli one of the most significant gardens, worthy of a grand ducal residence. Unfortunately, Tribolo died soon after and the work was taken over first by Bartolomeo Ammannati and then by Bernardo Buontalenti. The Grotto of the Madama, realized between 1553 and 1555 in order to recreate a natural environment populated by mysterious stone beings and animals, was one of the first important constructions. Between 1583 and 1593 a large grotto, known as Buontalenti Grotto, was constructed by Bernardo Buontalenti in place of a nursery designed by Vasari. This spectacular grotto was built with limestone concrete stalactites, shells and terracotta reliefs, with water running down the walls providing vivacity and colour. In 1631 Giulio Parigi transformed the Amphitheatre from garden architecture into masonry architecture with the installation, in the first half of the 18th century, of the Egyptian obelisk originally from Luxor but more recently from the Medici’s Roman collections and the basin from the Baths of Caracalla in Rome. The Statue of Abundance, begun by Giambologna and completed by PietroTacca, dominates the whole complex from above. Under Grand Dukes Cosimo II and Ferdinando II de’ Medici the Gardens were enlarged by Giulio and Alfonso Parigi to the South, parallel to the Palace within the city walls. The Viottolone is a wide central avenue at the end of which Alfonso Parigi designed a large elliptical basin with a central islet, both populated by statues of fantastical and mythological figures. The Ocean, a monumental statue by Giambologna, was placed in the centre of the Island. In the second half of the 18th century, under Grand Duke of Tuscany Peter Leopold, the first of a series of substantial interventions by architects such as Gaspare Maria Paoletti, Giuseppe Cacialli, Pasquale Poccianti and Zanobi del Rosso were commissioned. The latter was commissioned by Peter Leopold to construct two complexes that were vital to the completion of the layout of the Gardens: the Kaffeehaus and the Lemon House. The Kaffeehaus is a stylish pavilion perched on the hillside and was a pleasant stop in walks taken by members of the Habsburg-Lorraine court; whereas the Lemon House was erected in place of the zoo Cosimo III had built for exotic animals of all sorts. The new building was for citrus fruit trees (about 500 earthenware tubs) collected by the Medici in the 16th century.

    Source : www.uffizi.it

    [Answer] Where did the Medici family build the Boboli Gardens?

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    [Answer] Where did the Medici family build the Boboli Gardens?

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    Florence, Italy - Florence’s spectacular Renaissance-era Palazzo Pitti bears the name of its first owner, Florentine banker Luca Pitti, who started the palace’s construction in the mid-1400s on the south side of the River Arno, near the Ponte Vecchio. But the palace’s most famous residents were the Medici family, who purchased the property in 1550, and turned it into the Grand Ducal residence and seat of the Medicis' power over Tuscany in the 16th century. The family also made their mark on the palace with the addition of the Boboli Gardens, which would become a model for many European courts to follow. Today, it’s a popular outdoor museum filled with manicured gardens, Renaissance statues, grottos, and large fountains.:

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