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    when entering the lane of an oncoming vehicle in order to pass, you will need at least how many feet to pass safely?

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    California Home Study Driver Ed Course

    This home study correspondence course satisfies the California DMV driver education requirements for students to obtain a learners permit and drivers license.

    California Driver Education

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    Meets the California DMV requirements for students under 18

    to get a Learners Permit and a Drivers License

    The California DMV Driver Handbook

    A child passenger restraint system is required for any child who is under the age of six and weighs 60 pounds or less. Either a seat belt or a child passenger restraint system may be used for each person who is age six or older or who weighs over 60 pounds.

    Here are some additional tips for using a child safety seat:

    The back seat is generally the safest place in the car for all children 12 years of age or younger.

    Babies up to 20 lbs. and about age one should ride in a safety seat secured to the back seat facing the rear of the car. Make sure the vehicle’s seat belt is put through the correct slot in the safety seat. Incorrectly fastened safety seats defeat their purpose and can result in injury. NOTE: Babies should not be placed forward or backward in the front passenger seat if the vehicle has a passenger-side air bag.

    Toddlers over 20 lbs. and about age one or older should ride in the back seat buckled into an approved child safety seat.

    RIDING SAFELY WITH AIR BAGS

    Most people can take steps to eliminate or reduce risk without turning off air bags. The biggest risk is being too close to the air bag. An air bag needs about 10 inches of space to inflate. Ride at least 10 inches (measured from the center of the steering wheel to your breastbone) from the air bag cover if you can do this while maintaining full control of the vehicle. If you cannot safely sit 10 inches away from the air bag, contact your vehicle dealer or manufacturer for advice about additional ways of moving back from your air bag.

    Passengers should also sit at least 10 inches away from the air bag.

    UNATTENDED CHILDREN IN MOTOR VEHICLES

    It is illegal to leave a child six years of age or younger unattended in a motor vehicle when:

    There are conditions that present a significant risk to the child’s health or safety. Example: leaving a child in a closed car on a very hot day.

    The vehicle’s engine is running, the keys are in the ignition, or both. Example: children can start or move the car causing injuries and/or deaths to themselves or others.

    Exception: The child may be left under the supervision of a person 12 years of age or older.

    The court may fine violators and require the person to attend a community education program. Also, the penalties for leaving an unattended child in a vehicle are more severe if the child is injured, requires emergency medical services, or dies.

    MERGING, PASSING, and ENTERING TRAFFIC

    Whenever you enter traffic, signal and be sure you have enough room to enter safely. You have to share space with traffic already on the road and must know how much space you need to:

    Merge with traffic.

    Cross or enter traffic.

    Pass other cars. Space To Merge

    Enter the freeway at or near the speed of traffic. (Remember that the maximum speed allowed is 65 mph on most freeways.) Do not stop before merging with freeway traffic unless absolutely necessary. Freeway traffic has the right of way.

    Any time you merge with other traffic, you need a gap of four seconds. That will give both you and the car you merge in front of a two-second following distance.

    Don’t try to squeeze into a gap that is too small. Leave yourself a big enough space cushion.

    Watch for vehicles around you. Use your mirrors and turn signals. Turn your head to look quickly to the side before changing lanes. Leave three seconds of space between you and the vehicle ahead. Make sure you can stop safely if you must.

    If you have to cross several lanes, cross them one at a time. If you stop to wait until all lanes are clear, you will tie up traffic and may cause an accident.

    Space To Cross Or Enter

    Whenever you cross or enter traffic from a full stop, you will need a large enough gap (from cars approaching in either direction) to get up to the speed of other vehicles. You need a gap that is:

    About half a block on city streets.

    About a full block on the highway.

    If you are crossing lanes or turning, make sure there are no cars or people blocking the path ahead or the path to the side. You don’t want to be caught in an intersection with traffic coming at you.

    Even if you have the green light, don’t start across if there are cars blocking your way. It is against the law to enter an intersection unless there is space to get completely across it. You can receive a citation if you block other traffic.

    Source : www.cal-driver-ed.com

    What are the rules of passing another vehicle?

    Any time you make traffic maneuvers such as changing lanes or passing other vehicles, you are creating a risk for yourself and others on the road. So, unless it is needed, avoid making unnecessary traffic maneuvers such as continuously changing lanes or passing other vehicles.

    What are the rules of passing another vehicle?

    Any time you make traffic maneuvers such as changing lanes or passing other vehicles, you are creating a risk for yourself and others on the road. So, unless it is needed, avoid making unnecessary traffic maneuvers such as continuously changing lanes or passing other vehicles.

    If you are approaching a vehicle in front of you that drives noticeably slower than the flow of traffic and speed limit, this situation can cause you a risk, and you realized that it is safe to pass the slow-moving vehicle, then it makes sense to pass that vehicle.

    Never drive faster than the flow of traffic, or over the speed limit, or at a speed that is unsafe for the current traffic, weather or road condition in order to pass other vehicles.

    When it is needed to pass other vehicles, the law requires you to only pass other vehicles on the left (using the left lane).  Avoid passing other vehicles using the right lane unless it is absolutely necessary to avoid a traffic hazard and when it is safe.

    When passing a motorcyclist, remember to give him/her the same full lane width as other vehicles. Never drive in the same lane with a motorcyclist, even if the lane is wide enough to fit your vehicle and the motorcyclist.

    You are required by law to signal at least 100 feet before changing lane.  Never pass a vehicle that has stopped for a pedestrian to cross.

    Passing on a Two-lane Roadway Passing on a two-lane roadway can be dangerous. You must be fully capable of making several critical traffic maneuvering decisions in a few seconds that are safe and successful.

    When you are ready to pass another vehicle on a two-lane roadway, you must consider these questions:

    Based on the road marking and sign, is it legal to pass?

    Based on the current traffic situation and/or road and weather condition, is it safe to pass the other vehicles?

    Is there oncoming traffic and if yes, how fast is it approaching your vehicle and how soon will it reach your vehicle.

    Do you have enough time to safely get around the vehicle in front of you without the risk of a head-on collision with oncoming traffic?

    How fast do you need to go and is it possible and safe to go that fast in order to pass the vehicle in front of you safely?  You have a few seconds to analyze the current situation and plan and strategize to safely pass the vehicle in front of you.

    Passing is illegal when:

    The center line is a double solid yellow line or there is a solid yellow line on your side.

    There is a DO NOT PASS sign on the roadway.

    A vehicle that is already going close to, or above the road's speed limit; this is because when you pass that vehicle that speed, you must go at least 10-15 miles per hour over the speed limit, which is illegal.

    You do not have enough time to pass the vehicle in front of you and safely return to your lane before reaching a solid yellow line or double solid yellow lines.

    You do not have enough time to pass the vehicle in front of you and safely return to your lane before confronting oncoming traffic within 200 feet of your vehicle.

    You are approaching a curve or top of the hill and are unable to see oncoming traffic from enough distance to assess if they may reach you during the passing maneuver, and/or you are also not able to see around the vehicle that you are passing.

    You are within 100 feet of a bridge or railroad crossing.

    You are behind a school bus that is loading or unloading children.

    It is also extremely dangerous to pass when:

    You would need to pass a long line of vehicles.

    The vehicle ahead of you is going to stop or turn.

    Traffic is too close for you to pass safely.

    You are nearing a No Passing Zone.

    The vehicle you wish to pass is already driving at or near the speed limit.

    You would be passing a vehicle on grades.

    When passing other vehicles in a two-lane roadway:

    Make sure that there are not any of the above situations, which will limit your ability to pass.

    Make sure that the passing lane is clear and there is no oncoming traffic that makes your turn unsafe.  It is hard to judge the speed and distance of oncoming vehicles, especially the large vehicles, so proceed carefully.

    Check your mirrors and look over your left shoulder to make sure that there are no cars trying to pass you.

    Turn on your left signal.

    Move to the left lane for passing.

    Speed up by about 10-15 mph over the speed of the vehicle that you are passing.

    After you pass the vehicle in front of you, look over your right shoulder and make sure that it is clear and you have enough space to return to your lane and then safely return to your lane.

    What should I do if another vehicle is passing me?

    If another vehicle is passing you, slow down a bit and let the other vehicle pass you safely.

    Never speed up when a vehicle is trying to pass you; this is not a friendly and thoughtful way of sharing the road and, most importantly, it is very dangerous in a two-lane road to speed up when another vehicle is passing you.

    Source : www.driverseducationusa.com

    Vehicle Positioning

    Following Distances Suppose you are on a two-lane road with an oncoming vehicle approaching and a bicyclist ahead to your right. Instead of driving between the vehicle and the bicyclist, take one danger at a time. First, slow down and let the oncoming vehicle pass. Then, when it is safe, move to the left to […]

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    SECTION 20 OF 28

    Vehicle Positioning

    HANDBOOK TABLE OF CONTENTS

    Following Distances

    Suppose you are on a two-lane road with an oncoming vehicle approaching and a bicyclist ahead to your right. Instead of driving between the vehicle and the bicyclist, take one danger at a time. First, slow down and let the oncoming vehicle pass. Then, when it is safe, move to the left to allow plenty of room (at least 3 feet) to pass the bicyclist.

    Persons Who Present Dangers to Drivers

    Increase your following distance and allow a bigger space cushion for drivers who may be potentially dangerous. Persons who present dangers are:

    Drivers who cannot see you because their view is blocked by buildings, trees, or other cars.

    Drivers backing out of driveways or parking spaces.

    Drivers who pass you when there is a curve or oncoming vehicle(s) ahead.

    Drivers about to be forced into your lane to avoid a vehicle, pedestrian, bicyclist, obstruction, or because of fewer lanes ahead.

    Pedestrians with umbrellas in front of their faces or hats pulled down over their eyes.

    Distracted people, such as:

    Delivery persons.

    Construction workers.

    Distracted pedestrians, such as those talking or texting on their electronic wireless communications device.

    Children, who often run into the street without looking.

    Drivers talking or texting on their electronic wireless communications device or speaking to their passengers.

    Drivers taking care of children, eating, or looking at maps while driving.

    Confused people, such as:

    Tourists, often at complicated intersections.

    Drivers who are looking for a house number or slow down for no apparent reason.

    Splitting the Difference

    Sometimes there will be dangers on both sides of the road at the same time. For example, there will be parked cars to the right and oncoming cars to the left. In this case, the best thing to do is “split the difference.” Steer a middle course between the oncoming cars and the parked cars.

    If one danger is greater than the other, give the most room to the most dangerous situation. Suppose there are oncoming cars on your left side and a child on a bike on your right side. The child is more likely to make a sudden move. Therefore, slow down and, if safe, use as much of your lane to the left as possible until you pass the child.

    Space to Merge

    Enter the freeway at or near the speed of traffic. Do not stop before merging into freeway traffic, unless it is absolutely necessary. Freeway traffic has the right-of-way. When it is safe, follow the “3-second rule” (refer to the “Do not be a tailgater!” section).

    Do not try to merge into a gap that is too small.

    Watch for vehicles around you. Use your mirrors and turn signals. Turn your head to look quickly over your shoulder before changing lanes or merging in traffic. Leave 3 seconds of space between you and the vehicle ahead of you. Make sure you can stop safely, if necessary.

    If you need to cross several freeway lanes, cross them one at a time. If you wait until all of the lanes are clear, you may cause traffic delays or a collision.

    Space to Cross or Enter

    When crossing or entering city or highway traffic from a full stop, signal, and leave a large enough gap to get up to the speed of other vehicles. You must share the space with traffic already on the road. It is important to know how much space you need for merging, crossing, entering, and exiting out of traffic. You need a gap that is about:

    Half a block on city streets.

    A full block on the highway.

    If you are crossing lanes or turning, make sure there are no vehicles or people blocking the path ahead or to the sides of your vehicle. You do not want to be caught in an intersection with traffic coming at you.

    Even if you have the green traffic signal light, do not start across the intersection if there are vehicles blocking your way.

    When turning left, do not start the turn just because an approaching vehicle has its right turn signal on. The driver may plan to turn just beyond you, or the signal may have been left on from an earlier turn. This is particularly true of motorcycles. Their signal lights often do not turn off automatically. Wait until the other driver actually starts to turn before you continue.

    Space to Exit

    When you plan to exit the freeway, give yourself plenty of time. You should know the name or number of the freeway exit you want, as well as the one that comes before it. To exit safely:

    Signal, look over your shoulder, and change lanes one at a time until you are in the proper lane to exit the freeway.

    Signal your intention to exit for approximately 5 seconds before reaching the exit.

    Be sure you are at the proper speed for leaving the traffic lane–not too fast (so you remain in control) and not too slow (so the flow of traffic can still move freely).

    Passing

    Passing When Approaching to Pass

    Before you pass, look ahead for road conditions and traffic that may cause other vehicles to move into your lane. Only pass when safe to do so. You must judge whether you have enough room to pass whenever you approach:

    An oncoming vehicle.

    A hill or curve.

    Source : www.dmv.ca.gov

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