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    $2,000 stimulus check update: Who is eligible if Senate vote succeeds

    As the Senate considers increasing stimulus checks to $2,000, here's what you need to know about when that might happen and who will be eligible.

    What a $2,000 stimulus check vote in the Senate might mean for you

    Daniella Medina

    Nashville Tennessean

    A bill proposing increasing the approved $600 stimulus check for COVID-19 relief to $2,000 is expected to be brought to a vote in the Senate as early as Tuesday after the House approved the increased amount Monday.

    The bill, which passed in a 275-134 vote, needed the support of two-thirds of House members present — a feat hard to reach in such a divided Washington. Republicans did not whip or pressure lawmakers on vote, leaving it up to members to decide on the bill's fate after House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif., last week blocked a unanimous consent request by Democrats to increase stimulus checks to $2,000.

    Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell blocked Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer's unanimous consent request Tuesday afternoon.

    President Donald Trump initially called the COVID-19 relief package a "disgrace," pushing for congressional support to increase the direct payment checks from $600 to $2,000.

    He signed the bill into law Sunday to "restore unemployment benefits, stop evictions, provide rental assistance, add money for PPP, return our airline workers back to work, add substantially more money for vaccine distribution, and much more."

    The $900 billion measure is part of a $1.4 trillion spending bill to fund the federal government through Sept. 30, 2021. Here's what will happen if the Senate approves — or rejects — the increased $2,000 stimulus package.

    Memes!:As Mitch McConnell blocks stimulus check Senate vote, Americans use memes to ask for $2,000

    When will the Senate vote on the stimulus check increase?

    The Senate is expected to vote on the increased stimulus checks on Tuesday.

    However, the bill's future remains unclear as the GOP-controlled Senate, already weary of more government spending, is likely to oppose the measure.

    Threatening to delay the Senate's vote on Trump's National Defense Authorization Act this week, Senator Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., said "Congress will not be going home for New Year's Eve" if Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell does not agree to an "up or down vote" on the increased stimulus checks.

    Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y. said Monday he would push for a vote to approve the bill on Tuesday.

    House approved, what now?:Here's when the Senate might vote on the $2,000 stimulus check

    What happens if the Senate doesn't approve the $2,000 stimulus checks?

    Should the Senate vote against the proposed $1,400 increase in stimulus checks, qualifying Americans would receive $600 direct payment checks.

    This is half the amount of the first round of stimulus checks given out in April.

    Who gets a stimulus check?

    In this second round, the following people are eligible to receive stimulus checks:

    Individuals who made up to $75,000 last year

    Couples who made up to $150,000 last year get $1,200

    Heads of household who made up to $112,500 last year

    Additional $600 per dependent child age 16 and under

    Immigrants who meet the eligibility criteria and have a valid social security number

    Immigrants with green cards or H-1B and H-2A work visas

    U.S. citizens married to foreign nationals without Social Security numbers

    Who doesn't?

    Similar to the first round of stimulus checks given out earlier this year, the following people are left out of the COVID-19 relief package:

    Individuals who earn more than $87,000 a year

    Couples who make more than $174,000 a year

    Heads of household with adjusted gross income greater than $124,500

    Individuals who earned more than $87,000 last year but are unemployed in 2020

    Students age 17 or older if claimed as a dependent

    Parents won't get $600 per child age 17 or older

    Adult dependents, including elderly parents or family members living under the care of an adult child claimed as a dependent

    Individuals without Social Security numbers

    Nonresident aliens, temporary workers, immigrants in the country illegally

    Stimulus checks:Who's getting left out?

    Are college students eligible for a stimulus check?

    It depends.

    Students age 17 or older whose parents or guardians claim as a dependent are not eligible for the second round of stimulus checks.

    But, self-supporting and older college students could be eligible to receive a check. If a student pays at least half of their own living expenses last year, they would not be able to be claimed as a dependent; the same goes for individuals ages 24 and up.

    However, many self-supporting and older college students do not file a tax return if their income isn't high enough. Without a 2019 tax return, the IRS is unable to process the student's information, making them ineligible to receive a stimulus check.

    Despite this, the push for the amended stimulus check bill could include relief for families living with dependent college students, adults living with disabilities or elderly family members, according to Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi.

    When will you get your stimulus check?

    According to the COVID-Related Tax Relief Act, Jan. 15, 2021 is the last day for the IRS to send out stimulus checks to Americans who qualified.

    If no changes are made to the bill in front of the Senate on Tuesday, stimulus checks could go out as soon as next week. The second round of payment will be easier since most Americans receiving checks will already have their information verified on the IRS' payment site, U.S. Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin told CNBC last week.

    Source : www.tennessean.com

    The Senate passed Biden’s $1.9 trillion stimulus bill – here’s what’s next

    The Democratic-led House now plans to vote on the Senate legislation Tuesday so that President Joe Biden can sign it into law early in the week.

    POLITICS

    The Senate passed Biden’s $1.9 trillion stimulus bill – here’s what’s next

    PUBLISHED SAT, MAR 6 20214:08 PM ESTUPDATED MON, MAR 8 20219:24 AM EST

    Thomas Franck @TOMWFRANCK WATCH LIVE KEY POINTS

    The Senate voted along party lines to approve the stimulus package.

    The Democratic-led House now plans to vote on the Senate legislation Tuesday so that President Joe Biden can sign it into law early in the week.

    This avoids the complicated step of trying to sort out differences between the two chambers in conference committee.

    House Democrats are expected to have the votes to pass the Senate bill.

    President Joe Biden expects people to start receiving stimulus checks this month.

    Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi (R), D-Calif., and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., hold a press briefing on Capitol Hill on Nov. 6, 2020.

    Nicholas Kamm | AFP | Getty Images

    The Senate has passed President Joe Biden’s landmark $1.9 trillion stimulus package, a major step in the bill’s evolution into law.

    The Senate, led by Majority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., voted along party lines Saturday to approve the massive Covid-19 relief plan, which includes $1,400 stimulus checks for many Americans, $350 billion in aid to state and local governments and an extension of federal unemployment benefits.

    The Democratic-led House now plans to vote on the Senate legislation Tuesday so that President Joe Biden can sign it into law early in the week, according to House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer. Democrats are racing to pass the package before enhanced unemployment aid lapses on Sunday, March 14.

    Passing the Senate version outright avoids the complicated step of trying to sort out differences between the two chambers in conference committee. Though the Senate bill is largely the same as the one passed by the House of Representatives in late February, there are some crucial differences.

    The most notable difference between the bill the House passed and the one approved by the Senate is that the latter does not contain a federal minimum wage increase to $15 per hour. Senate Democrats were forced to abandon that provision after the parliamentarian ruled that the chamber could not pass the pay raise for millions of Americans under budget reconciliation.

    Democrats in both chambers have passed the American Rescue Plan through reconciliation, a process that allows a party to pass a bill with a simple majority vote but restricts the types of provisions that can be included.

    House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., has already made clear that her caucus will “absolutely” pass the Senate bill even if an increase to the minimum wage must be pursued in future legislation. Pelosi, in a statement Saturday, praised the Senate bill as a “tremendous step forward to defeat the virus.”

    “Today is a day of great progress and promise for the American people, as the Democratic Senate has passed President Biden’s American Rescue Plan to save lives and livelihoods,” Pelosi said.

    “The House now hopes to have a bipartisan vote on this life-saving legislation and urges Republicans to join us in recognition of the devastating reality of this vicious virus and economic crisis and of the need for decisive action,” she said.

    Though Pelosi is calling for bipartisan support, Republicans on Capitol Hill almost universally oppose the bill as too expensive even with the minimum wage hike no longer included. Not a single Republican voted for the Senate legislation, and Democrats are unlikely to win converts in the House.

    Senate Democrats were forced to make concessions in order to keep moderates in their own ranks on board, namely Sen. Joe Manchin of West Virginia. The legislation now maintains the federal jobless benefit supplement at the current $300 per week, rather than the $400 in the House bill. The change would keep the policy in place through September, rather than end it on Aug. 29 as the House plan did.

    Still, House Democrats are expected to have the votes to pass the Senate bill. Biden, in remarks after the Senate vote, said he expects people to start receiving stimulus checks this month.

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    Senate passes $1.9 trillion Covid relief bill, including $1,400 stimulus checks, with no Republican support

    The Senate passed a $1.9 trillion coronavirus relief package Saturday, capping off a marathon overnight session after Democrats resolved internal clashes that threatened to derail President Joe Biden's top legislative priority.

    CONGRESS

    Senate passes $1.9 trillion Covid relief bill, including $1,400 stimulus checks, with no Republican support

    The House will vote Tuesday on this version of the legislation before it goes to President Joe Biden, who called the aid "urgently needed," for his signature.

    March 6, 2021, 5:24 PM UTC

    By Sahil Kapur

    WASHINGTON — The Senate passed a $1.9 trillion coronavirus relief package Saturday, capping off a marathon overnight session after Democrats resolved internal clashes that threatened to derail President Joe Biden's top legislative priority.

    The far-reaching legislation includes $1,400 stimulus checks, $300-per-week jobless benefits through the summer, a child allowance of up to $3,600 for one year, $350 billion for state aid, $34 billion to expand Affordable Care Act subsidies and $14 billion for vaccine distribution.

    The final vote was 50-49 along party lines, with every Republican voting "no." It came after Democrats voted down a swath of Republican amendments on repeated votes of 50-49 to avoid disrupting the delicate agreement between progressive and moderate senators.

    Before it can be signed by Biden, the legislation will have to be passed again by the House because the Senate made changes to its version. House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer, D-Md., said the chamber would vote Tuesday on the Senate-passed legislation.

    'Help is on the way': Biden on Senate passing 'desperately needed' Covid relief bill

    Biden called the aid package "urgently needed" and praised the Senate for passing it Saturday, saying it will get "checks out the door" to Americans "this month."

    "The resources in this plan will be used to speed up manufacturing and distribution of the vaccines, so that we can get every American vaccinated sooner rather than later," he said.

    He praised the Senate and hailed the measure's "overwhelming bipartisan support of the American people," referring to polling that indicates the legislation is broadly popular.

    The vote was a critical early test of Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer's ability to keep all 50 Democrats unified behind a major piece of legislation despite being an ideologically and regionally diverse caucus.

    "From the beginning, we said this: We had to pass this legislation," the New York Democrat told reporters. "We made a promise to the American people that we were going to deliver the real relief they needed. And now we have fulfilled that promise."

    Schumer said Biden called him and he told the president, "I knew we would get this done."

    Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., blasted Democrats for taking a partisan approach and argued that they would not deserve credit for the economic recovery.

    Get the Morning Rundown

    Get a head start on the morning's top stories.

    "The Senate has never spent $2 trillion in a more haphazard or less rigorous way," he said. “Democrats inherited a tide that is already turning."

    The legislation would be a victory for Biden, who campaigned for president primarily on bringing Covid-19 under control and reviving a shattered economy. The package also includes many progressive priorities, although others like a minimum wage hike to $15 an hour were forced out. Experts say the new policies will sharply cut child poverty.

    Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer gives a thumbs up after the Senate passed a Covid-19 relief bill in Washington, on March 6, 2021.J. Scott Applewhite / AP

    The absence of Sen. Dan Sullivan, R-Alaska, due to a family emergency prevented Vice President Kamala Harris from having to break a tie in the 50-50 chamber, which she had to do to allow the Senate to begin debate on the bill.

    The Senate's changes to the House-passed version of the plan include reducing the jobless benefits to $300 (from $400 in the House bill) and extending them slightly to Sept. 6. The Senate limited eligibility for the $1,400 checks by capping the payments for those who make $80,000, or $160,000 for couples. And the bill subsidizes 100 percent of COBRA insurance coverage for jobless Americans, up from 85 percent in the House version.

    The Senate also approved some modest and noncontroversial amendments offered by both parties before passing the final version.

    The Senate appeared ready to begin the lengthy process, known as a "vote-a-rama," on Friday morning. But then Democratic leadership hit pause to sort out a last-minute dispute over jobless benefits and keep Sen. Joe Manchin of West Virginia on board after he appeared ready to side with Republicans and change that provision, a move that would have alienated progressives.

    Senate passes $1.9 trillion Covid relief bill with no GOP support

    As a result, Democrats dragged out the first vote of the day for 11 hours and 50 minutes, setting a record for the longest Senate vote.

    Source : www.nbcnews.com

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