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    The Senate approves a bill to make daylight saving time permanent : NPR

    For those wishing for an end to annual clock shifting, this push in Congress is perhaps better late than never. It would still require House approval and President Biden's signature to become law.

    National

    The Senate approves a bill to make daylight saving time permanent

    Updated March 16, 202212:21 PM ET

    JOE HERNANDEZ Twitter

    A clock technician adjusts the hands on a large outdoor clock under construction at Electric Time Company in Medfield, Mass, last year, just days before daylight saving time was set to end.

    Steven Senne/AP

    The Senate passed a bill Tuesday that would make daylight saving time permanent across the U.S. beginning in 2023. The so-called Sunshine Protection Act of 2021 was approved by unanimous consent, but would still require House approval and President Biden's signature to become law.

    For those wishing for an end to annual clock shifting, this most recent push in Congress is perhaps better late than never.

    "We don't have to keep doing this stupidity anymore. And why we would enshrine this in our laws and keep it for so long is beyond me," Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., one of the sponsors of the bill, said on the Senate floor.

    "Hopefully, this is the year that this gets done. And pardon the pun, but this is an idea whose time has come," he added.

    House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer's office tells NPR that there are no immediate plans to vote on daylight saving time, but notes the House Committee on Energy and Commerce had a hearing on it last week and there's bipartisan support for it.

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    Daylight saving time currently makes up roughly eight months of the year, with the remainder counterintuitively called standard time.

    Daylight saving time began as a bid to pack more hours of sunlight into the day during the summer months and cut down on energy use, though critics question how effective it's been toward that goal.

    Instead, health experts say switching our clocks twice a year has led to an uptick in sleep deprivation and other health problems. The American Academy of Sleep Medicine supports a year-round national standard time.

    An Economist/YouGov poll from last fall found that 63% of U.S. adults want to eliminate the biannual changing of clocks. It also found that more people support instituting daylight saving time permanently rather than standard time.

    Over the last four years, at least 18 states have passed laws to permanently switch to daylight saving time, according to the National Conference of State Legislatures, though federal law must first be changed to allow it.

    daylight saving time

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    Senate Votes to Make Daylight Saving Time Permanent, House Still to Consider – NBC 5 Dallas

    The Senate approved legislation Tuesday that would make Daylight Saving Time permanent in the U.S. starting in 2023. The bill now heads to the U.S. House.

    DAYLIGHT SAVING TIME

    Senate Approves Bill to Make Daylight Saving Time Permanent, Passes to House

    Senate Approves Bill to Make Daylight Saving Time Permanent, Passes to House Nearly a dozen states across the U.S. have already standardized daylight saving time

    By Farnousgh Amiri • Published March 15, 2022 • Updated on March 15, 2022 at 11:31 pm

    1:19

    Senate Passes Bill to Make Daylight Saving Time Permanent

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    Senate Passes Bill to Make Daylight Saving Time Permanent

    NBCUniversal Media, LLC

    The bill has to pass the House to become law, but if passed, it could mean the end of changing clocks twice a year.

    The Senate unanimously approved a measure Tuesday that would make daylight saving time permanent across the United States next year.

    The bipartisan bill, named the Sunshine Protection Act, would ensure Americans would no longer have to change their clocks twice a year. But the bill still needs approval from the House, and the signature of President Joe Biden, to become law.

    "No more switching clocks, more daylight hours to spend outside after school and after work, and more smiles — that is what we get with permanent Daylight Saving Time,” Sen. Ed Markey of Massachusetts, the original cosponsor of the legislation, said in a statement.

    Markey was joined on the chamber floor by senators from both parties as they made the case for how making daylight saving time permanent would have positive effects on public health and the economy and even cut energy consumption.

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    Everything You Should Know About Daylight Saving Time

    Here is everything you should know about daylight saving time, from when it starts and ends, to why it was created (it wasn’t to help farmers) and if “saving” is plural or singular.

    “Changing the clock twice a year is outdated and unnecessary,” Republican Sen. Rick Scott of Florida said.

    Download our local news and weather app for Apple or Android— and choose the alerts you want.

    “I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again: Americans want more sunshine and less depression — people in this country, all the way from Seattle to Miami, want the Sunshine Protection Act,” Sen. Patty Murray of Washington added.

    Nearly a dozen states across the U.S. have already standardized daylight saving time.

    More Daylight Saving Time Coverage

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    Daylight saving time is defined as a period between spring and fall when clocks in most parts of the country are set one hour ahead of standard time. Americans last changed their clocks on Sunday. Standard time lasts for roughly four months in most of the country.

    Members of Congress have long been interested in the potential benefits and costs of daylight saving time since it was first adopted as a wartime measure in 1942. The proposal will now go to the House, where the Energy and Commerce Committee had a hearing to discuss possible legislation last week.

    Rep. Frank Pallone, the chairman of the committee, agreed in his opening statement at the hearing that it is “time we stop changing our clocks.” But he said he was undecided about whether daylight saving time or standard time is the way to go.

    Markey said Tuesday, "Now, I call on my colleagues in the House of Representatives to lighten up and swiftly pass the Sunshine Protection Act.”

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    The History of Daylight Saving Time

    Every spring we set our clocks forward an hour, and every fall we set them back, but why? Before you "spring forward" an hour this weekend, learn the real story behind Daylight Saving Time.

    Copyright AP - Associated Press

    This article tagged under:

    DAYLIGHT SAVING TIMECONGRESS

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    U.S. Senate approves bill to make daylight saving time permanent

    The U.S. Senate on Tuesday passed legislation that would make daylight saving time permanent starting in 2023, ending the twice-annual changing of clocks in a move promoted by supporters advocating brighter afternoons and more economic activity.

    March 16, 20224:26 PM UTC

    Last Updated 19 hours ago

    U.S. Senate approves bill to make daylight saving time permanent

    By David Shepardson 3 minute read

    This video file cannot be played.

    (Error Code: 102630)

    WASHINGTON, March 15 (Reuters) - The U.S. Senate on Tuesday passed legislation that would make daylight saving time permanent starting in 2023, ending the twice-annual changing of clocks in a move promoted by supporters advocating brighter afternoons and more economic activity.

    The Senate approved the measure, called the Sunshine Protection Act, unanimously by voice vote. The House of Representatives, which has held a committee hearing on the matter, must still pass the bill before it can go to President Joe Biden to sign.

    The White House has not said whether Biden supports it. A spokesman for House Speaker Nancy Pelosi declined to say if she supports the measure but said she was reviewing it closely.

    Register now for FREE unlimited access to Reuters.com

    Senator Marco Rubio, one of the bill's sponsors, said supporters agreed the change would not take place until November 2023 after input from airlines and broadcasters.

    The change would help enable children to play outdoors later and reduce seasonal depression, according to supporters.

    "I know this is not the most important issue confronting America, but it's one of those issues where there's a lot of agreement," Rubio said. "If we can get this passed, we don't have to do this stupidity anymore."

    "Pardon the pun, but this is an idea whose time has come," he added.

    The National Association of Convenience Stores opposes the change, telling Congress this month "we should not have kids going to school in the dark."

    On Sunday, most of the United States resumed daylight saving time, moving ahead one hour. The United States will resume standard time in November.

    1/2

    A man runs near the reflecting pool between the Lincoln Memorial and the Washington Monument at sunrise on the National Mall in Washington, U.S., September 19, 2019. REUTERS/Al Drago/File Photo

    Since 2015, about 30 states have introduced legislation to end the twice-yearly changing of clocks, with some states proposing to do it only if neighboring states do the same.

    The House Energy and Commerce committee held a hearing on the issue last week, where Representative Frank Pallone, the committee's chairman, said, "The loss of that one hour of sleep seems to impact us for days afterwards. It also can cause havoc on the sleeping patterns of our kids and our pets."

    Pallone backs ending the clock-switching but has not decided whether to support daylight or standard time as the permanent choice.

    At the hearing, Beth Malow, director of the Vanderbilt Sleep Division, argued daylight savings time makes it harder to be alert in the morning, saying it "is like living in the wrong time zone for almost eight months out of the year."

    Pallone cited a 2019 poll that found 71% of Americans prefer to no longer switch their clocks twice a year.

    Supporters say the change could prevent a slight uptick in car crashes that typically occurs around the time changes and point to studies showing a small increase in the rate of heart attacks and strokes soon after the time change. They argue the measure could help businesses such as golf courses that could draw more use with more evening daylight.

    "It has real repercussions on our economy and our daily lives," said Senator Ed Markey, another leading sponsor.

    Daylight saving time has been in place in nearly all of the United States since the 1960s after being first tried in 1918. Year-round daylight savings time was used during World War Two and adopted again in 1973 in a bid to reduce energy use because of an oil embargo and repealed a year later.

    The bill would allow Arizona and Hawaii, which do not observe daylight saving time, to remain on standard time as well as American Samoa, Guam, the Northern Mariana Islands, Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands.

    Register now for FREE unlimited access to Reuters.com

    Reporting by David Shepardson Editing by Will Dunham, Chizu Nomiyama and Karishma Singh

    Our Standards: The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.

    Source : www.reuters.com

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