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    when analyzing an argument, which elements should you focus on most? select three options. counterclaim claim reasons dissent evidence

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    When analyzing an argument, which elements should you focus on most? select three options. counterclaim claim reasons dissent evidence

    ✅ | When analyzing an argument, which elements should you focus on most? select three options. counterclaim claim reasons dissent evidence - smarttteacher.com

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    When analyzing an argument, which elements should you focus on most? select three options. counterclaim claim reasons dissent evidence

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    ELA 10

    Study with Quizlet and memorize flashcards terms like What fallacy can you identify and discredit to develop a counterclaim to this claim? Read the passage from the opinion of the court in Dred Scott v. Sandford, written by Justice Taney. The question before us is, whether the class of persons described in the plea in abatement compose a portion of this people, and are constituent members of this sovereignty? We think they are not, and that they are not included, and were not intended to be included, under the word "citizens" in the Constitution, and can therefore claim none of the rights and privileges which that instrument provides for and secures to citizens of the United States. On the contrary, they were at that time considered as a subordinate and inferior class of beings, who had been subjugated by the dominant race, and, whether emancipated or not, yet remained subject to their authority, and had no rights or privileges but such as those who held the power and the Government might choose to grant them. - A) the idea that citizens have rights and privileges that are guaranteed in the Constitution B) the idea that noncitizens cannot claim certain rights and privileges in the Constitution C) the idea that the plaintiff considers himself a citizen and therefore has rights and privileges D) the idea that African American people are inferior based on perceptions from an earlier time, Which statement best serves as a counterclaim to the claim in this passage? Read the passage from the opinion of the court in Dred Scott v. Sandford, written by Justice Taney. The question before us is, whether the class of persons described in the plea in abatement compose a portion of this people, and are constituent members of this sovereignty? We think they are not, and that they are not included, and were not intended to be included, under the word "citizens" in the Constitution, and can therefore claim none of the rights and privileges which that instrument provides for and secures to citizens of the United States. On the contrary, they were at that time considered as a subordinate and inferior class of beings, who had been subjugated by the dominant race, and, whether emancipated or not, yet remained subject to their authority, and had no rights or privileges but such as those who held the power and the Government might choose to grant them. - A) Taney fails to provide any actual evidence for his statements that African Americans were universally considered inferior. B) Taney cannot use states' rights to claim that the plaintiff is not a citizen, because citizenship is federal. C) Taney's argument that emancipated people were still controlled by whites is false because they were free. D) Taney's argument that African Americans were not citizens is false because their ancestors were forced to come here., Which statement best describes an effective counterclaim to the claim in this passage? Read the passage from the opinion of the court in Dred Scott v. Sandford, written by Justice Taney. It will be observed, that the plea applies to that class of persons only whose ancestors were negroes of the African race, and imported into this country, and sold and held as slaves. The only matter in issue before the court, therefore, is, whether the descendants of such slaves, when they shall be emancipated, or who are born of parents who had become free before their birth, are citizens of a State, in the sense in which the word "citizen" is used in the Constitution of the United States. . . . . . . The question before us is, whether the class of persons described in the plea in abatement compose a portion of this people, and are constituent members of this sovereignty? We think they are not, and that they are not included, and were not intended to be included, under the word "citizens" in the Constitution, and can therefore claim none of the rights and privileges which that instrument provides for and secures to citizens of the United States. - A) Because Dred Scott's parents were born outside the United States, he is not considered to be a citizen with all the rights granted by the Constitution. B) Because Dred Scott was the child of enslaved people, he is considered to be of a different class than citizens, according to the Constitution. C) Because Dred Scott and his family were born in the United States, they are citizens with all the rights granted by the Constitution. D) Because Dred Scott lives in a free state, he is considered to be a citizen with all the rights granted by the Constitution. and more.

    ELA 10 - Analyzing a Seminal US Document (Pre-Test)

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    What fallacy can you identify and discredit to develop a counterclaim to this claim?

    Read the passage from the opinion of the court in Dred Scott v. Sandford, written by Justice Taney.

    The question before us is, whether the class of persons described in the plea in abatement compose a portion of this people, and are constituent members of this sovereignty? We think they are not, and that they are not included, and were not intended to be included, under the word "citizens" in the Constitution, and can therefore claim none of the rights and privileges which that instrument provides for and secures to citizens of the United States. On the contrary, they were at that time considered as a subordinate and inferior class of beings, who had been subjugated by the dominant race, and, whether emancipated or not, yet remained subject to their authority, and had no rights or privileges but such as those who held the power and the Government might choose to grant them.

    -

    A) the idea that citizens have rights and privileges that are guaranteed in the Constitution

    B) the idea that noncitizens cannot claim certain rights and privileges in the Constitution

    C) the idea that the plaintiff considers himself a citizen and therefore has rights and privileges

    D) the idea that African American people are inferior based on perceptions from an earlier time

    Click card to see definition 👆

    D) the idea that African American people are inferior based on perceptions from an earlier time

    Click again to see term 👆

    Which statement best serves as a counterclaim to the claim in this passage?

    Read the passage from the opinion of the court in Dred Scott v. Sandford, written by Justice Taney.

    The question before us is, whether the class of persons described in the plea in abatement compose a portion of this people, and are constituent members of this sovereignty? We think they are not, and that they are not included, and were not intended to be included, under the word "citizens" in the Constitution, and can therefore claim none of the rights and privileges which that instrument provides for and secures to citizens of the United States. On the contrary, they were at that time considered as a subordinate and inferior class of beings, who had been subjugated by the dominant race, and, whether emancipated or not, yet remained subject to their authority, and had no rights or privileges but such as those who held the power and the Government might choose to grant them.

    -

    A) Taney fails to provide any actual evidence for his statements that African Americans were universally considered inferior.

    B) Taney cannot use states' rights to claim that the plaintiff is not a citizen, because citizenship is federal.

    C) Taney's argument that emancipated people were still controlled by whites is false because they were free.

    D) Taney's argument that African Americans were not citizens is false because their ancestors were forced to come here.

    Click card to see definition 👆

    A) Taney fails to provide any actual evidence for his statements that African Americans were universally considered inferior.

    Click again to see term 👆

    1/10 Created by TriggeredChiken

    Terms in this set (10)

    What fallacy can you identify and discredit to develop a counterclaim to this claim?

    Read the passage from the opinion of the court in Dred Scott v. Sandford, written by Justice Taney.

    The question before us is, whether the class of persons described in the plea in abatement compose a portion of this people, and are constituent members of this sovereignty? We think they are not, and that they are not included, and were not intended to be included, under the word "citizens" in the Constitution, and can therefore claim none of the rights and privileges which that instrument provides for and secures to citizens of the United States. On the contrary, they were at that time considered as a subordinate and inferior class of beings, who had been subjugated by the dominant race, and, whether emancipated or not, yet remained subject to their authority, and had no rights or privileges but such as those who held the power and the Government might choose to grant them.

    -

    A) the idea that citizens have rights and privileges that are guaranteed in the Constitution

    B) the idea that noncitizens cannot claim certain rights and privileges in the Constitution

    C) the idea that the plaintiff considers himself a citizen and therefore has rights and privileges

    D) the idea that African American people are inferior based on perceptions from an earlier time

    D) the idea that African American people are inferior based on perceptions from an earlier time

    Which statement best serves as a counterclaim to the claim in this passage?

    Read the passage from the opinion of the court in Dred Scott v. Sandford, written by Justice Taney.

    The question before us is, whether the class of persons described in the plea in abatement compose a portion of this people, and are constituent members of this sovereignty? We think they are not, and that they are not included, and were not intended to be included, under the word "citizens" in the Constitution, and can therefore claim none of the rights and privileges which that instrument provides for and secures to citizens of the United States. On the contrary, they were at that time considered as a subordinate and inferior class of beings, who had been subjugated by the dominant race, and, whether emancipated or not, yet remained subject to their authority, and had no rights or privileges but such as those who held the power and the Government might choose to grant them.

    Source : quizlet.com

    Parts of An Argument: Claims, Counterclaims, Reasons, and Evidence

    An effective argument is meant to persuade others of the speakers claim. Discover more about the four parts of an argument--the claim,...

    English Courses / Course / Chapter

    Parts of An Argument: Claims, Counterclaims, Reasons, and Evidence

    Instructor: Kimberly Bennett

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    An effective argument is meant to persuade others of the speakers claim. Discover more about the four parts of an argument--the claim, counterclaim, reason, and evidence--how each part functions and how they come together to build a strong argument. Updated: 09/23/2021

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    Parts of an Argument

    How would you like to be able to win any argument? Today we're going to learn about the parts of an argument necessary to win one! The purpose of an argument, whether it's in a paper or a speech, is to convince or persuade. The main parts of an argument are:

    Claims Counterclaims Reasons Evidence

    Quiz Course 361K views

    Claims

    'Mom, I really need a new cell phone!' If you've ever said this or something like it, you've made a claim. Making a claim is just a fancy way of saying that you're stating your main point. In a formal paper, you might say something like, 'It is necessary for me to obtain a new cell phone.' Claims are not just opinions. A claim tells what you think is true about a topic based on your knowledge and your research. If you're ever going to convince your mom to get that new cell phone that's just perfect for you, you're going to have to move beyond mere opinions. You're going to need to support your claim to get rid of that crummy, old, obsolete phone that's holding you back.

    Counterclaims

    But there are two sides to every argument. In your argument for a new cell phone, your mom stands on the other side. She has something to say against your claim that you need a new cell phone, and it goes something like, 'No, you don't.'

    That's your mom's counterclaim. A counterclaim is just the opposite of a claim. In a more formal way, she might say, 'Your current situation does not require a new cell phone.' Counterclaims are also provable and supportable by reasons and evidence. Not just, 'Because I said so.' When you're planning an argument, you need to know what the counterclaim might be so that you can make sure that you disprove it with your reasons and evidence.

    Reasons

    After your mom's counterclaim, she'll probably ask, 'Why is it that you think you need a new cell phone?'

    Then it's time for the reasons you've prepared well in advance, because you know exactly what she'll ask. 'My cell phone doesn't have Internet access.'

    That's a reason. A reason tells why. A reason makes someone care and tells the importance of the claim and the argument. 'Because I said so,' doesn't work, and 'Just because,' doesn't work - until you're a parent. In an argument, your, 'My cell phone doesn't have Internet access,' would need to be beefed up a little, to, 'My current cell phone doesn't provide Internet access, which is necessary for me to complete all my homework.' That is provable, because your phone is so old it barely has texting!

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    Common Core ELA Grade 8 - Writing: Standards

    9 chapters | 59 lessons

    Ch 1. Writing Arguments: CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.8.1

    Essay Introduction: Write a Thesis and Capture Your Audience

    7:08

    Point of View: First, Second & Third Person

    8:03

    Logos, Ethos and Pathos: 3 Ways to Appeal to an Audience in Essays

    5:46

    Writing for An Audience: How to Structure Your Argument

    7:11

    Parts of An Argument: Claims, Counterclaims, Reasons, and Evidence

    5:40 4:19 Next Lesson

    How to Support Your Claims in Writing With Reasoning and Evidence

    How to Establish and Maintain a Formal Writing Style

    5:04

    Concluding Statements: Supporting Your Argument

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    Writing Arguments: CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.8.1

    Ch 2. Writing Informative Texts:...

    Ch 3. Writing Narratives:...

    Ch 4. Writing Development, Organization &...

    Ch 5. Revising & Editing:...

    Ch 6. Conducting Research:...

    Ch 7. Finding & Citing Sources:...

    Ch 8. Analyze Texts:...

    Ch 9. Writing Practice:...

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