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    what will most likely happen if a sound wave moves from the air through a solid? it will increase in frequency. it will decrease in speed. it will increase in speed. it will decrease in wavelength.

    James

    Guys, does anyone know the answer?

    get what will most likely happen if a sound wave moves from the air through a solid? it will increase in frequency. it will decrease in speed. it will increase in speed. it will decrease in wavelength. from EN Bilgi.

    When the speed of a sound wave increases while travelling through different mediums, does its frequency increase or the wavelength decrease?

    Answer (1 of 3): You can test this one out for yourself. Fill your bath. Put a radio somewhere safely outside the bath and turn it on. Get in the bath, hold your breath, and duck under the water. You'll notice that while the sound is greatly muffled, it doesn't change pitch. You can also observe...

    When the speed of a sound wave increases while travelling through different mediums, does its frequency increase or the wavelength decrease?

    Sort Mike Richmond

    , BA Physics & Philosophy, University of Oxford

    Answered 6 years ago · Author has 14.4K answers and 35.5M answer views

    The wavelength increases when a sound wave travels from a less dense to a more dense medium, the speed increases, and the frequency stays the same.

    If you think about the boundary between the less dense medium and the more dense medium, the wave is hitting the boundary at the frequency of the propagation in the less dense medium. If it came out of the other end of the denser medium at a lower (or higher) frequency, peaks in the wave would have to be destroyed (or created).

    The wave goes faster in the denser medium, and so travels further between peaks of the waveform, thus a longer wavelength.

    Related questions

    When a sound wave goes from one medium to another, the frequency of it doesn't change but amplitude, wavelength and speed changes, why?

    Does the speed of a wave change when the frequency or wavelength increase?

    How does a sound wave change according to the increasing or decreasing of its speed?

    What will happen to a wave’s frequency if its speed increases and its wavelength remains the same?

    The speed of sound is 350 m/s. If a sound wave travels at a frequency of 55 Hz, what would its wavelength be?

    Kajal Sengupta

    , Online Physics Teacher

    Answered 6 years ago · Author has 1.5K answers and 3.5M answer views

    Please remember that frequency is a property of source. Unless you change the source there will be no change in frequency . When sound passes through different media then wavelength and velocity changes . For example in solids velocity of sound is more than in liquids and hence wavelength is lesser.

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    Scott Sakurai

    , I have a ham radio license, does that help?

    Answered 6 years ago · Author has 1K answers and 3.7M answer views

    You can test this one out for yourself. Fill your bath. Put a radio somewhere safely outside the bath and turn it on. Get in the bath, hold your breath, and duck under the water. You'll notice that while the sound is greatly muffled, it doesn't change pitch.

    You can also observe this with musical instruments. Cold has some effect on string instruments as it changes their dimensions, but it has massive effects on wind instruments because the air inside is the resonant element, and their pitch is directly related to the speed of sound because it is determined by how long it takes for the pulse to

    Kim Aaron

    , Has PhD in fluid dynamics from Caltech

    Answered 4 years ago · Author has 7K answers and 16.4M answer views

    Related

    When a sound wave goes from one medium to another, the frequency of it doesn't change but amplitude, wavelength and speed changes, why?

    When a sound wave goes from one medium to another, the frequency of it doesn't change but amplitude, wavelength and speed changes, why?

    Suppose I have a tube and the bottom is filled with water and floating on top of it, there is some turpentine (paint thinner). The speed of sound in the water is about 1500 m/s. In the turps, it is about 1200 m/s. Here’s a cartoon of what it looks like:

    I’ve drawn the surfaces wiggly just so you can distinguish them. The idea is that they are actually flat.

    Now you smack your hand onto the top surface of the turps. A wave will move down through the turps are 1200

    Chad Courtney , works at Intel

    Answered 4 years ago · Author has 8.7K answers and 7.8M answer views

    Related

    What will happen when the amplitude of sound increases?

    It gets louder…

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    (Tee) Tee Lee

    , studied Psychobiotic & Separate Sciences at Shrewsbury International School

    Updated 4 years ago Related

    When the frequency of sound increases what is decreased?

    I think you mean “"When the frequency of sound is increase, what effects will be caused”

    As wave is a form of transferring energy and frequency is the number of times the wave oscillates per 1 second and there are many things going on if you change the frequency of a wave…

    Okay, now let’s see what happens what happens when you increase the frequency of a wave step-by-step

    Firstly when you increase the frequency of any general waves; the wavelength will decrease. In this case, if we say the wave speed will remain the same (v=f x (lampda)). Because the wave length decrease as the frequency increase

    Jay Dee Archer

    , studied Science at University of Alberta (1996)

    Answered 1 year ago Related

    When the amplitude of a sound wave is increased, what happens to the pitch of the sound?

    Amplitude does not affect pitch. Frequency does. Increase frequency (decreased wavelength) increases the pitch. An increase in amplitude increases the pressure, which means an increase in volume. That is, it gets louder. Of course, the opposite is true if the amplitude decreases. It gets softer.

    Source : www.quora.com

    Properties of Waves Flashcards

    Start studying Properties of Waves. Learn vocabulary, terms, and more with flashcards, games, and other study tools.

    Properties of Waves

    4.7 9 Reviews

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    Aansi wants energy on a sound wave to be carried more quickly through a metal medium. Which could she do?

    Click card to see definition 👆

    increase the temperature

    Click again to see term 👆

    Which accurately ranks the waves from the lowest energy wave to the highest energy wave?

    Click card to see definition 👆

    1 → 4 → 2 → 3

    Click again to see term 👆

    1/10 Created by Trea_Castro

    Terms in this set (10)

    Aansi wants energy on a sound wave to be carried more quickly through a metal medium. Which could she do?

    increase the temperature

    Which accurately ranks the waves from the lowest energy wave to the highest energy wave?

    1 → 4 → 2 → 3

    Which statement is best supported by the information in the chart?

    Wave X is moving the fastest.

    A wave is traveling at 36 m/s. If its wavelength is 12 m, how many times does a wavelength move across a set point every second?

    three times

    A wave of infrared light has a speed of 6 m/s and a wavelength of 12 m. What is the frequency of this wave?

    0.5 Hz

    Which are examples of a medium?

    water and air

    What will most likely happen if a light wave moves through a solid?

    It will decrease in speed.

    What is the speed of a wave with a frequency of 2 Hz and a wavelength of 87 m?

    174 m/s

    What will most likely happen if a sound wave moves from the air through a solid?

    It will increase in speed.

    Henri draws a wave that has a 4 cm distance between the midpoint and the trough. Geri draws a wave that has an 8 cm vertical distance from the bottom of the trough to the top of the crest.

    Which statement best describes the energy in Henri and Geri's waves?

    Henri's wave and Geri's wave have the same amplitude and the same energy.

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    10^{8} 10 8

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    2.00 \times 10 ^ { 2 }

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    14.1 Speed of Sound, Frequency, and Wavelength

    Physics

    14.1 Speed of Sound, Frequency, and Wavelength

    14.1 Speed of Sound, Frequency, and Wavelength

    SECTION LEARNING OBJECTIVES

    By the end of this section, you will be able to do the following:

    Relate the characteristics of waves to properties of sound waves

    Describe the speed of sound and how it changes in various media

    Relate the speed of sound to frequency and wavelength of a sound wave

    Section Key Terms

    rarefaction sound

    Properties of Sound Waves

    Sound is a wave. More specifically, sound is defined to be a disturbance of matter that is transmitted from its source outward. A disturbance is anything that is moved from its state of equilibrium. Some sound waves can be characterized as periodic waves, which means that the atoms that make up the matter experience simple harmonic motion.

    A vibrating string produces a sound wave as illustrated in Figure 14.2, Figure 14.3, and Figure 14.4. As the string oscillates back and forth, part of the string’s energy goes into compressing and expanding the surrounding air. This creates slightly higher and lower pressures. The higher pressure... regions are compressions, and the low pressure regions are rarefactions. The pressure disturbance moves through the air as longitudinal waves with the same frequency as the string. Some of the energy is lost in the form of thermal energy transferred to the air. You may recall from the chapter on waves that areas of compression and rarefaction in longitudinal waves (such as sound) are analogous to crests and troughs in transverse waves.

    Figure 14.2 A vibrating string moving to the right compresses the air in front of it and expands the air behind it.

    Figure 14.3 As the string moves to the left, it creates another compression and rarefaction as the particles on the right move away from the string.

    Figure 14.4 After many vibrations, there is a series of compressions and rarefactions that have been transmitted from the string as a sound wave. The graph shows gauge pressure (Pgauge) versus distance x from the source. Gauge pressure is the pressure relative to atmospheric pressure; it is positive for pressures above atmospheric pressure, and negative for pressures below it. For ordinary, everyday sounds, pressures vary only slightly from average atmospheric pressure.

    The amplitude of a sound wave decreases with distance from its source, because the energy of the wave is spread over a larger and larger area. But some of the energy is also absorbed by objects, such as the eardrum in Figure 14.5, and some of the energy is converted to thermal energy in the air. Figure 14.4 shows a graph of gauge pressure versus distance from the vibrating string. From this figure, you can see that the compression of a longitudinal wave is analogous to the peak of a transverse wave, and the rarefaction of a longitudinal wave is analogous to the trough of a transverse wave. Just as a transverse wave alternates between peaks and troughs, a longitudinal wave alternates between compression and rarefaction.

    Figure 14.5 Sound wave compressions and rarefactions travel up the ear canal and force the eardrum to vibrate. There is a net force on the eardrum, since the sound wave pressures differ from the atmospheric pressure found behind the eardrum. A complicated mechanism converts the vibrations to nerve impulses, which are then interpreted by the brain.

    The Speed of Sound

    The speed of sound varies greatly depending upon the medium it is traveling through. The speed of sound in a medium is determined by a combination of the medium’s rigidity (or compressibility in gases) and its density. The more rigid (or less compressible) the medium, the faster the speed of sound. The greater the density of a medium, the slower the speed of sound. The speed of sound in air is low, because air is compressible. Because liquids and solids are relatively rigid and very difficult to compress, the speed of sound in such media is generally greater than in gases. Table 14.1 shows the speed of sound in various media. Since temperature affects density, the speed of sound varies with the temperature of the medium through which it’s traveling to some extent, especially for gases.

    Medium vw (m/s)

    Gases at 0 °C

    Air 331 Carbon dioxide 259 Oxygen 316 Helium 965 Hydrogen 1290

    Liquids at 20 °C

    Ethanol 1160 Mercury 1450 Water, fresh 1480 Sea water 1540 Human tissue 1540

    Solids (longitudinal or bulk)

    Vulcanized rubber 54

    Polyethylene 920 Marble 3810 Glass, Pyrex 5640 Lead 1960 Aluminum 5120 Steel 5960

    Table 14.1 Speed of Sound in Various Media

    The Relationship Between the Speed of Sound and the Frequency and Wavelength of a Sound Wave

    Source : openstax.org

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    James 8 day ago
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