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    what was the estimated population of the united states on july 4, 1776?

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    What was the estimated population of the United States on July 4, 1776?

    How many people were living in the United States when the Declaration of Independence was issued by the Congress on July 4, 1776?

    > #history , #united-states , #interesting-facts > What was the estimated population of the United States on July 4, 1776?

    Anonymous

    Jul 5, 2020

    #history #united-states #interesting-facts

    What was the estimated population of the United States on July 4, 1776?

    How many people were living in the United States when the Declaration of Independence was issued by the Congress on July 4, 1776?

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    Sort By Anonymous Jul 5, 2020

    According to the government Census Bureau, on July 4, 1776, the population was 2.5 million.

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    July 4th: Celebrating 243 Years of Independence

    As the nation prepares for parades, fireworks and other festivities, here’s a look at our nation through historical facts and census statistics.

    SKIP HEADER

    An official website of the United States government

    Here’s how you know

    July 4th: Celebrating 243 Years of Independence

    DERICK MOORE JULY 02, 2019

    Who was the first signer of the Declaration of Independence? Is there a U.S. county named Independence? What was the nation’s population in 1776?

    Answers:

    John Hancock, a merchant by trade, was the first to sign the Declaration of Independence.

    The only county named Independence is in Arkansas.

    The U.S. population was 2.5 million in 1776. It is more than 130 times larger today at 330 million.

    As the nation celebrates this Independence Day, it’s a good time to reflect on how our Founding Fathers enshrined in our Constitution the importance of statistics as a vital tool for measuring people, places and economy.

    The U.S. population was 2.5 million in 1776. It is more than 130 times larger today at 330 million.

    The following statistics — historical and whimsical — come from responses to U.S. Census Bureau surveys:

    In July 1776, an estimated 2.5 million people lived in the 13 colonies (Series B 12 table below). According to recent projections, there are 330 million residents as of July 1, 2019 (Projections for the United States: 2017-2060, Table 1 below).

    The oldest signer, at age 70, was Benjamin Franklin of Pennsylvania. Franklin County, Pa., had an estimated population of 154,835 on July 1, 2018. There are 24 counties named Franklin in the United States.

    The youngest signer, at age 26, was Edward Rutledge of South Carolina. There are no counties named Rutledge.

    Speaking of county names, there are four counties named Liberty (Florida, Georgia, Montana, Texas) and 18 counties and one parish named Union.

    $368.6 million worth of fireworks were sold in 2012 through establishments classified as NAICS 453998 and all other miscellaneous retailers (except tobacco stores).

    More Fun Facts

    The Census Bureau’s Statistics in Schools program has created this Fun Facts & Teaching Guide for the Fourth of July.

    Teachers can interact with students by using fun but real-life data related to the holiday. The teaching guide offers ideas on how to use these facts as an activity.

    More stories

    Broad Diversity of Asian, Native Hawaiian, Pacific Islander Population

    Who Is Receiving Social Safety Net Benefits?

    Census Bureau Today Releases 2020 Census Undercount, Overcount Rates by State

    AMERICA COUNTS HOME Subscribe

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    America Counts tells the stories behind the numbers in a new inviting way. We feature stories on various topics such as families, housing, employment, business, education, the economy, emergency management, health, population, income and poverty.

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    This story was filed under:

    Population

    POPULATION

    Median Age Doesn’t Tell the Whole Story

    Population characteristics released today show that counties can have the same median age but very different age structures.

    Source : www.census.gov

    Fun Facts: 4th of July by the Numbers

    Here's some fun numbers to keep in mind as you celebrate Independence Day.

    Fun Facts: 4th of July by the Numbers

    Military.com | By Census.gov

    On this day in 1776, the Declaration of Independence was approved by the Continental Congress, setting the 13 colonies on the road to freedom as a sovereign nation. As always, this most American of holidays will be marked by parades, fireworks and backyard barbecues across the country.

    2.5 million - In July 1776, the estimated number of people living in the newly independent nation.

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    Source: Historical Statistics of the United States: Colonial Times to 1970

    311.7 million - The nation's estimated population on this July Fourth.

    Source: US Census Population clock

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    Flags$4.0 million

    - In 2013, the dollar value of U.S. imports of American flags. The vast majority of this amount ($3.9 million) was for U.S. flags made in China.

    Source: Flag Manufacturers Association of America

    $781,222 - Dollar value of U.S. flags exported in 2013. The Dominican Republic was the leading customer, purchasing $160,000 worth.

    Source: Flag Manufacturers Association of America

    $302.7 million - Annual dollar value of shipments of fabricated flags, banners and similar emblems by the nation's manufacturers, according to the latest published economic census data.

    Source: 2007 Economic Census

    Fireworks$223.6 million - The value of fireworks imported from China in 2011, representing the bulk of all U.S. fireworks imported ($232.5 million). U.S. exports of fireworks, by comparison, came to just $15.8 million in 2011, with Australia purchasing more than any other country ($4.5 million).

    Source: Foreign Trade Statistics

    $231.8 million - The value of U.S. manufacturers' shipments of fireworks and pyrotechnics (including flares, igniters, etc.) in 2007.

    Source: 2007 Economic Census

    Towns with Patriotic Names31 - Places have “liberty” in their names. The most populous one as of April 1, 2010, is Liberty, Mo. (2,339) Iowa, with four, has more of these places than any other state: Libertyville, New Liberty, North Liberty and West Liberty.35 - Places have “eagle” in their names. The most populous one is Eagle Pass, Texas (26,248).11 - Places have “independence” in their names. The most populous one is Independence, Mo. (116,830).9 - Places have “freedom” in their names. The most populous one is New Freedom, Pa. (4,464).1 - One place with “patriot” in the name. Patriot, Ind. (209).5 - Places have “America” in their names. The most populous is American Fork, Utah (26,263).

    Source: US Census - American FactFinder

    Early Presidential Last Names138 - Ranking of the frequency of the surname of our first president, George Washington, among all last names tabulated in the 2000 Census. Other early presidential names that appear on the list, along with their ranking, were Adams (39), Jefferson (594), Madison (1,209) and Monroe (567).

    Source: Census 2000 Genealogy

    Fourth of July CookoutsMore than 1 in 4 - The chance that the hot dogs and pork sausages consumed on the Fourth of July originated in Iowa. The Hawkeye State was home to 19.0 million hogs and pigs on March 1, 2011. This estimate represents more than one-fourth of the nation's estimated total. North Carolina (8.6 million) and Minnesota (7.6 million) were also homes to large numbers of pigs.

    Source: USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service

    6.8 billion pounds - Total production of cattle and calves in Texas in 2010. Chances are good that the beef hot dogs, steaks and burgers on your backyard grill came from the Lone Star State, which accounted for about one-sixth of the nation's total production. And if the beef did not come from Texas, it very well may have come from Nebraska (4.6 billion pounds) or Kansas (4.1 billion pounds).

    Source: USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service

    6 - Number of states in which the value of broiler chicken production was $1 billion or greater between December 2009 and November 2010. There is a good chance that one of these states — Georgia, Arkansas, North Carolina, Alabama, Mississippi or Texas — is the source of your barbecued chicken.

    Source: USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service

    Over 1 in 3 - The odds that your side dish of baked beans originated from North Dakota, which produced 36 percent of the nation's dry, edible beans in 2010. Another popular Fourth of July side dish is corn on the cob. Florida, California, Georgia, Washington and New York together accounted for 68 percent of the fresh market sweet corn produced nationally in 2010.

    Source: USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service

    Over 7 in 10 - Of the nation's head lettuce production in 2010 that came from California. This lettuce may end up in your salad or on your burger.

    Source: USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service

    7 in 10 - The chances that the fresh tomatoes in your salad came from Florida or California, which combined accounted for 71 percent of U.S. fresh market tomato production last year.

    Source : www.military.com

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