if you want to remove an article from website contact us from top.

    what was the effect of the english policy that gave british officials the right to search, without cause, warehouses and ships belonging to colonists?

    James

    Guys, does anyone know the answer?

    get what was the effect of the english policy that gave british officials the right to search, without cause, warehouses and ships belonging to colonists? from EN Bilgi.

    Origins of the Fourth Amendment on JSTOR

    Leonard W. Levy, Origins of the Fourth Amendment, Political Science Quarterly, Vol. 114, No. 1 (Spring, 1999), pp. 79-101

    Skip to Main Content

    JOURNAL ARTICLE Leonard W. Levy

    Political Science Quarterly

    Vol. 114, No. 1 (Spring, 1999), pp. 79-101 (23 pages)

    Published By: The Academy of Political Science

    https://doi.org/10.2307/2657992

    https://www.jstor.org/stable/2657992

    Read and download

    Log in through your school or library

    The Political Science Quarterly is the oldest and most widely read political science journal in the country. Published since 1886, PSQ offers crucial and timely analysis of both domestic and foreign policy issues as well as of political institutions and processes. PSQ has no ideological or methodological bias and is edited to make even technical findings clear to political scientists, historians, and other social scientists regardless of subfield. Each issue consists of five or six insightful articles by leading scholars as well as 30 to 40 scholarly and useful book reviews. To browse and search through issues published in the last five years, please visit http://www.psqonline.org.

    The Academy of Political Science is a nonpartisan, nonprofit organization founded in 1880 with a threefold mission: (1) to contribute to the scholarly examination of political institutions, processes, and public policies, (2) to enrich political discourse and channel the best social science research in an understandable way to political leaders for use in public policy making and the process of governing, and (3) to educate members of the general public so that they become informed voters in the democratic process. The major vehicles for accomplishing these goals are its journal, Political Science Quarterly, Academy conferences, and the publication of proceedings or symposia based on conference presentations. The prestige and authority of the Academy are such that statesmen and scholars of all political persuasions have enrolled as members, participated in its conferences, and contributed to its publications. Former presidents Gerald Ford, Jimmy Carter, Ronald Reagan, and George Bush are honorary members of the Academy. For information about institutional subscriptions, individual membership, back issues, reprints, permissions, or manuscript submissions contact The Academy of Political Science. This information is also available at http://www.psqonline.org/.

    This item is part of a JSTOR Collection.

    For terms and use, please refer to our Terms and Conditions

    Political Science Quarterly © 1999 The Academy of Political Science

    Request Permissions

    Source : www.jstor.org

    How Britain Tried to Intimidate Colonial Taxpayers into Compliance

    The Fourth Amendment The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreas­onable sear­ches and seizures, shall...

    Prewar Politics (<1775)September 29, 2016

    HOW BRITAIN TRIED TO INTIMIDATE COLONIAL TAXPAYERS INTO COMPLIANCE

    by Neal Nusholtz

    The Fourth Amendment

    The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreas­onable sear­ches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no War­rants shall issue, but upon probable cause, sup­ported by Oath or affir­mation, and parti­cularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized.

    During 1767 England enacted a few laws to generate more revenue in the American Colonies. One of those laws created a Board of Customs Com­mis­sioners to supervise revenue collection in America.[1]

    The Board of Customs Commissioners

    The Board located itself in Boston on November 5, 1767.[2] Their report home on February 12, 1768 sounded desperate. There was a shortage of seizures:

    … our Offi­cers in these northern parts have been greatly discouraged for want of support from Government.

    Tho’ smugling has been carried to a very great height, yet six seizures only have been made in the New England Provinces, within the course of two years and a half; and only one prosecuted to effect. a second· was rescued out of the custody of our Officers at Falmouth who were at the same time attacked by a Mob; A third was rescued at Newbury, and the Officers greatly abused, A fourth was carried off clandestinely at New-London, while, under prosecution; the fifth and sixth were acquitted at Rhode Island, thro’ the combination and influence of the people. The Officers of this Port were resisted in the Summer 1766, at noonday, when endeavouring to enter the house of one Malcolm, and finding themselves un­supported against a numerous mob that was assembled, they were obliged to retire without making the seizure …

    At present, there is not a Ship of War in the province, nor a company of Soldiers nearer than New York, which is two hundred and fifty miles distant from this place.[3]

    Paul Revere’s 1770 print of British troops landing in Boston in 1768. Arrow points to the Romney. (Boston Public Library)

    Three months later, the navy’s commander in chief of the North American station, Samuel Hood, responded. On May 2, he ordered Capt. John Corner “to proceed without loss of time with His Majesty’s ship Romney under your command to Boston … to be aiding and assisting unto the Commis­sioner of the Customs.”[4] On June 10, two revenue officers went on board John Hancock’s sloop, the Liberty, at the end of Hancock’s wharf. They seized the ship and turned it over to the custody of the Romney.

    Hancock’s Wharf

    When they saw the Liberty being taken, a mob came running onto the wharf. They threatened to throw the Romney’s people overboard. They pelted the officers with rocks and grabbed the mooring lines of the Liberty in a tug of war with the Romney. After the Romney towed the Liberty away, the mob beat up the two seizing revenue officers. Members of the Board of Customs Commissioners hid for the night. The Commissioners fled to Castle William on the Romney the following morning. They dispatched a missive to England covering the events. [5]

    The Coming of the Troops

    After September of 1768, an anonymous newspaper column about events in Boston began to appear in Boston, New York, Philadelphia, other parts of the country and in England.[6] It was titled A Journal of the Times.   It started with a report of the arrival of troops on September 28, 1768: “Advice received that the men of war and transports from Halifax, with about 900 troops from several parts of America were safe arrived at Nantasket Harbor.”[7] Nantasket Peninsula is about 11 miles from Boston as the crow flies.

    On October 1, 1768, 700 troops landed in Boston and marched through town to camp out in the Commons.[8] An October 16, 1768 entry reported:

    This day Capt. Jenkins arrived from London, who brought a print of August 13th, in which there is the following article,—”There are 4000 troops ordered for Boston, which it is thought will sufficiently intimidate those people to comply with the laws enacted in England; especially as the other colonies seem to have deserted them.[9]

    Another 2,000 troops arrived on October 24, 1768.[10] A November 18, 1768 entry reported twelve ships of war plying the waters of Boston when the 64th and 65th Regiments landed with 500 men each. [11] A December 26, 1768 Journal entry reported:

    This morning a vessel from Salem or Marblehead, having a cask of sugar on board, which it was supposed had not been properly cleared out, was seized by one of the custom-house officers, who brought a number of SOLDIERS! to assist and keep possession of said vessel, but upon discovery that the sugar had been reported at the Custom-House, she was soon released. It is very extraordinary that soldiers should be called in upon such occasions: It seems calculated to lead Administration to conceive that the quartering of troops in this town is necessary to enable the customhouse officers to discharge their duty.[12]

    Source : allthingsliberty.com

    30 EOC Practice Test Questions Flashcards

    The following are 30 EOC practice test questions. ENJOY! Learn with flashcards, games, and more — for free.

    30 EOC Practice Test Questions

    5.0 2 Reviews

    8 studiers in the last day

    Which idea in the Declaration of Independence did John Locke inspire?

    Click card to see definition 👆

    right to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness

    Click again to see term 👆

    How is Montesquieu's view of separation of powers demonstrated in the U.S. Constitution?

    Click card to see definition 👆

    The legislative, executive, and judicial branches divide federal powers.

    Click again to see term 👆

    1/30 Created by SeverinP

    The following are 30 EOC practice test questions.

    ENJOY!

    Terms in this set (30)

    Which idea in the Declaration of Independence did John Locke inspire?

    right to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness

    How is Montesquieu's view of separation of powers demonstrated in the U.S. Constitution?

    The legislative, executive, and judicial branches divide federal powers.

    Which Enlightenment idea would John Locke support?

    Power comes from the consent of the governed.

    The newspaper headline below describes an event.

    10,000 People Rally in front of the White House

    Protesting the War in Iraq

    What Enlightenment idea is represented by the headline?

    social contract

    Which colonial document established the idea of direct democracy?

    Mayflower Compact

    What basic political principle of democratic government do the Magna Carta and the English Bill of Rights establish?

    limited government

    What was a direct impact of Thomas Paine's Common Sense?

    It generated support for the Declaration of Independence.

    What impact has the Mayflower Compact had on modern understanding of the purpose of government in the United States?

    The government should provide equal protection under the law.

    In what ways did the Declaration of Independence present the argument for independence?

    It listed their rights to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness and described examples of King George III's abuse of power.

    What was the effect of the English policy that gave British officials the right to search, without cause, warehouses and ships belonging to colonists?

    Colonists protested the policy as an abuse of their individual rights.

    Sign up and see the remaining cards. It’s free!

    Boost your grades with unlimited access to millions of flashcards, games and more.

    Continue with Google

    Continue with Facebook

    Already have an account?

    Log in

    Related questions

    QUESTION

    Centuries ago, breeder chose the smallest variations of poodles for several generations t produce the toy poodles we know today. This is an example of...

    4 answers QUESTION

    What is the joint classification for the typical cervical zygapophysis?

    15 answers QUESTION

    temperature, pH, and amounts of both enzyme and substrate

    2 answers QUESTION

    An interpretation of a test score, such as a percentile score, that is based on the individual's performance relative to scores obtained by a group of individuals, would be considered a

    7 answers

    Sets found in the same folder

    Civics EOC Benchmarks

    20 terms DJ0106

    civics chapter 12 review (other)

    10 terms BLJones03

    Civics chapter 9

    24 terms talyn333

    All Civics terms

    413 terms happyk96

    Sets with similar terms

    Civics Unit 2, 3, and 4 Test Questions

    60 terms bugzpanther_

    Civics Unit 2, 3, and 4 Test Questions

    60 terms samrosentreter

    2.07 Module Exam

    67 terms Michaela_Woods

    chapter 2 standards

    23 terms ryannkimm

    Other sets by this creator

    Crash Course 16

    19 terms SeverinP

    25 Essential Words Biology

    25 terms SeverinP

    Periodic Table Vocabulary

    21 terms SeverinP

    Periodic Table Vocabulary

    10 terms SeverinP

    Other Quizlet sets

    Human & Cellular Biology

    49 terms Mangomango12

    Comprehensive Quiz

    35 terms theChris_SolPLUS

    Lab 3 background

    16 terms Lex_Hatzenbuehler

    Biology Test (Chapter 18)

    16 terms

    BraydenJamesAduddell

    1/5

    Source : quizlet.com

    Do you want to see answer or more ?
    James 9 month ago
    4

    Guys, does anyone know the answer?

    Click For Answer