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    what was one unintended result of glasnost? communism became more, rather than less, popular. the soviet government became more corrupt. people discovered they had more political freedom. more citizens protested against the soviet government.

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    get what was one unintended result of glasnost? communism became more, rather than less, popular. the soviet government became more corrupt. people discovered they had more political freedom. more citizens protested against the soviet government. from EN Bilgi.

    glasnost

    glasnost, (Russian: “openness”) Soviet policy of open discussion of political and social issues. It was instituted by Mikhail Gorbachev in the late 1980s and began the democratization of the Soviet Union. Ultimately, fundamental changes to the political structure of the Soviet Union occurred: the power of the Communist Party was reduced, and multicandidate elections took place. Glasnost also permitted criticism of government officials and allowed the media freer dissemination of news and information. (See also perestroika.)

    glasnost

    Soviet government policy

    By The Editors of Encyclopaedia Britannica • Edit History

    glasnost, (Russian: “openness”) Soviet policy of open discussion of political and social issues. It was instituted by Mikhail Gorbachev in the late 1980s and began the democratization of the Soviet Union. Ultimately, fundamental changes to the political structure of the Soviet Union occurred: the power of the Communist Party was reduced, and multicandidate elections took place. Glasnost also permitted criticism of government officials and allowed the media freer dissemination of news and information. (See also perestroika.)

    This article was most recently revised and updated by Heather Campbell.

    Source : www.britannica.com

    The End of the Cold War Flashcards

    Study with Quizlet and memorize flashcards terms like Cuban leader Fidel Castro responded to the fall of the Soviet Union by, Which of the following most accurately describes China today?, Which of the following was a result of perestroika? and more.

    The End of the Cold War

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    Cuban leader Fidel Castro responded to the fall of the Soviet Union by

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    renewing his commitment to Communism.

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    Which of the following most accurately describes China today?

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    China remains Communist but is also a major economic power.

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    1/18 Created by xalanis

    Terms in this set (18)

    Cuban leader Fidel Castro responded to the fall of the Soviet Union by

    renewing his commitment to Communism.

    Which of the following most accurately describes China today?

    China remains Communist but is also a major economic power.

    Which of the following was a result of perestroika?

    long lines in stores

    Following the collapse of the USSR, Cuba's government

    remained Communist.

    The meaning of the Russian term glasnost in English is

    openness

    Which Eastern European nation was the first to reject Communism between 1989 and 1991?

    Poland

    Citizens in Berlin began to tear down the Berlin Wall soon after

    East Germany opened its borders.

    A problem that arose as a result of glasnost was that

    the Soviet people became more aware of corruption in government.

    One of Gorbachev's reforms, perestroika, had the goal of

    creating a free market.

    A result of the attempted coup against the Soviet government in 1991 was that

    Soviet states began to declare independence.

    What was one unintended result of glasnost?

    More citizens protested against the Soviet government.

    Which of the following helped make the reunification of Germany possible?

    the end of the Cold War

    The Bush administration helped bring about the collapse of the Soviet Union by ________________

    supporting Gorbachev's reforms

    In 1989, Tiananmen Square in Beijing was the site of

    pro-democracy demonstrations.

    Which of the following is a true statement about George H. W. Bush?

    He trusted Gorbachev more than Reagan did.

    The Berlin Wall was viewed as a symbol of

    Communist oppression.

    Which of the following best describes the relationship between President George H. W. Bush and Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev?

    They negotiated arms-reduction agreements.

    The collapse of the USSR had a strong negative effect on which of the following nations?

    Cuba

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    Internal Workings of the Soviet Union

    Lenin, Stalin and the Bolsheviks used ruthless methods to surprises political rivals with tight centralization and secret police to enforce power with terror.

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    Revelations from the Russian Archives

    Internal Workings of the Soviet Union

    Home | Acknowledgments | Essay

    Sections: Internal Workings of the Soviet System | The Soviet Union and the United States

    Having come to power in October 1917 by means of a coup d'état, Vladimir Lenin and the Bolsheviks spent the next few years struggling to maintain their rule against widespread popular opposition. They had overthrown the provisional democratic government and were inherently hostile to any form of popular participation in politics. In the name of the revolutionary cause, they employed ruthless methods to suppress real or perceived political enemies. The small, elite group of Bolshevik revolutionaries which formed the core of the newly established Communist Party dictatorship ruled by decree, enforced with terror.

    This tradition of tight centralization, with decision-making concentrated at the highest party levels, reached new dimensions under Joseph Stalin. As many of these archival documents show, there was little input from below. The party elite determined the goals of the state and the means of achieving them in almost complete isolation from the people. They believed that the interests of the individual were to be sacrificed to those of the state, which was advancing a sacred social task. Stalin's “revolution from above” sought to build socialism by means of forced collectivization and industrialization, programs that entailed tremendous human suffering and loss of life.

    Although this tragic episode in Soviet history at least had some economic purpose, the police terror inflicted upon the party and the population in the 1930s, in which millions of innocent people perished, had no rationale beyond assuring Stalin's absolute dominance. By the time the Great Terror ended, Stalin had subjected all aspects of Soviet society to strict party-state control, not tolerating even the slightest expression of local initiative, let alone political unorthodoxy. The Stalinist leadership felt especially threatened by the intelligentsia, whose creative efforts were thwarted through the strictest censorship; by religious groups, who were persecuted and driven underground; and by non-Russian nationalities, many of whom were deported en masse to Siberia during World War II because Stalin questioned their loyalty.

    Although Stalin's successors also persecuted writers and dissidents, they used police terror more sparingly to coerce the population, and they sought to gain some popular support by relaxing political controls and introducing economic incentives. Nonetheless, strict centralization continued and eventually led to the economic decline, inefficiency, and apathy that characterized the 1970s and 1980s, and contributed to the Chernobyl' nuclear disaster. Mikhail Gorbachev's program of perestroika was a reaction to this situation, but its success was limited by his reluctance to abolish the bastions of Soviet power—the party, the police, and the centralized economic system—until he was forced to do so after the attempted coup in August 1991. By that time, however, it was too late to hold either the Communist leadership or the Soviet Union together. After seventy-four years of existence, the Soviet system crumbled.

    Repression and Terror: Stalin in Control

    Repression and Terror: Kirov Murder and Purges

    Secret Police The Gulag

    Collectivization and Industrialization

    Anti-religious Campaigns

    Attacks on Intelligentsia: Early Attacks

    Attacks on Intelligentsia: Renewed Attacks

    Attacks on Intelligentsia: Censorship

    Attacks on Intelligentsia: Suppressing Dissidents

    Ukrainian Famine Deportations

    The Jewish Antifascist Committee

    Chernobyl Perestroika

    Repression and Terror: Stalin in Control

    During the second half of the 1920s, Joseph Stalin set the stage for gaining absolute power by employing police repression against opposition elements within the Communist Party. The machinery of coercion had previously been used only against opponents of Bolshevism, not against party members themselves. The first victims were Politburo members Leon Trotskii, Grigorii Zinov'ev, and Lev Kamenev, who were defeated and expelled from the party in late 1927. Stalin then turned against Nikolai Bukharin, who was denounced as a “right opposition,” for opposing his policy of forced collectivization and rapid industrialization at the expense of the peasantry.

    Stalin and colleagues, 1929

    A celebration of Joseph Stalin's 50th birthday in the Kremlin, December 21, 1929, with party members Ordzhonikidze, Voroshilov, Kuibyshev, Stalin, Kalinin, Kaganovich, and Kirov, as a statue of Lenin looks on.

    Source : www.loc.gov

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