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    what was most likely the author’s immediate purpose in writing what to the slave is the fourth of july?” to persuade readers about the unjust treatment of african americans to inform readers about the daily lives of african americans to describe his own experiences encountering various social issues to discuss some social issues he considered to be of great importance

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    Analyzing reasoning and rhetoric: what to the slave is the fourth of july? Flashcards

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    What was most likely the author's immediate purpose in writing "What to the Slave is the Fourth of July?"

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    to persuade readers about the unjust treatment of African Americans

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    Which excerpt is a counterclaim in "What to the Slave is the Fourth of July?"

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    What, then, remains to be argued? Is it that slavery is not divine; that God did not establish it; that our doctors of divinity are mistaken?

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    What was most likely the author's immediate purpose in writing "What to the Slave is the Fourth of July?"

    to persuade readers about the unjust treatment of African Americans

    Which excerpt is a counterclaim in "What to the Slave is the Fourth of July?"

    What, then, remains to be argued? Is it that slavery is not divine; that God did not establish it; that our doctors of divinity are mistaken?

    Which group in nineteenth-century America would likely be the most receptive audience for "What to the Slave is the Fourth of July?"

    abolitionists

    What is the chief claim of "What to the Slave is the Fourth of July?"

    African Americans deserve equal treatment and status in American society.

    Read the excerpt from "What to the Slave is the Fourth of July?"Are the great principles of political freedom and of natural justice, embodied in that Declaration of Independence, extended to us?How does this rhetorical question contribute to the passage's central idea?

    It reinforces the idea that the rights given to others are not extended to African Americans.

    Read the excerpt from "What to the Slave is the Fourth of July?".But I fancy I hear some one of my audience say, "It is just in this circumstance that you and your brother abolitionists fail to make a favorable impression on the public mind. Would you argue more, and denounce less; would you persuade more, and rebuke less; your cause would be much more likely to succeed." But, I submit, where all is plain there is nothing to be argued. What point in the anti-slavery creed would you have me argue? On what branch of the subject do the people of this country need light? Must I undertake to prove that the slave is a man? That point is conceded already. Nobody doubts it.Which statement best explains why this is an example of a counterclaim by Douglass?

    Douglass addresses a potential argument of the other side and makes a case against it.

    Read the excerpt from "What to the Slave is the Fourth of July?"Must I argue the wrongfulness of slavery? Is that a question for Republicans? Is it to be settled by the rules of logic and argumentation, as a matter beset with great difficulty, involving a doubtful application of the principle of justice, hard to be understood?What do the rhetorical questions in the excerpt suggest?

    The wrongfulness of slavery should be obvious.

    Which statement best explains why "What to the Slave is the Fourth of July?" is an example of inductive reasoning, as a whole?

    It uses a specific holiday as a basis for the broader conclusion that is constructed throughout the rest of the speech.

    How does the speech "What to the Slave is the Fourth of July?" relate to American life during Douglass's time?

    It addresses the need for equality for all people.

    Read the excerpt from "What to the Slave is the Fourth of July?"Fellow-citizens, above your national, tumultuous joy, I hear the mournful wail of millions! whose chains, heavy and grievous yesterday, are, to-day, rendered more intolerable by the jubilee shouts that reach them. If I do forget, if I do not faithfully remember those bleeding children of sorrow this day, "may my right hand forget her cunning, and may my tongue cleave to the roof of my mouth!" To forget them, to pass lightly over their wrongs, and to chime in with the popular theme, would be treason most scandalous and shocking, and would make me a reproach before God and the world. My subject, then, fellow-citizens, is American slavery. I shall see this day and its popular characteristics from the slave's point of view.Which best describes why this is an example of inductive reasoning?

    It starts with details and uses them to support a more sweeping statement.

    Read the excerpt from "What to the Slave is the Fourth of July?"To him, your celebration is a sham; your boasted liberty, an unholy license; your national greatness, swelling vanity; your sounds of rejoicing are empty and heartless; your denunciation of tyrants, brass fronted impudence; your shouts of liberty and equality, hollow mockery; your prayers and hymns, your sermons and thanksgivings, with all your religious parade and solemnity, are, to Him, mere bombast, fraud, deception, impiety, and hypocrisy — a thin veil to cover up crimes which would disgrace a nation of savages.What is the effect of the repetition of "your"?

    It reinforces the speaker's feeling of separation.

    Read the excerpt from "What to the Slave is the Fourth of July?"Is it not astonishing that, while we are ploughing, planting, and reaping, using all kinds of mechanical tools, erecting houses, constructing bridges, building ships, working in metals of brass, iron, copper, silver and gold; that, while we are reading, writing and ciphering, acting as clerks, merchants and secretaries, having among us lawyers, doctors, ministers, poets, authors, editors, orators and teachers; that, while we are engaged in all manner of enterprises common to other men, digging gold in California, capturing the whale in the Pacific, feeding sheep and cattle on the hill-side, living, moving, acting, thinking, planning, living in families as husbands, wives and children, and, above all, confessing and worshipping the Christian's God, and looking hopefully for life and immortality beyond the grave, we are called upon to prove that we are men!Based on the excerpt above, what was most likely true about this time in the nation's history?

    Source : quizlet.com

    Behind the Speech: What to the Slave Is the Fourth of July?

    Pulitzer-winning Frederick Douglass biographer David Blight explains what to know about the famous speech, and why its message still endures

    'What to the Slave Is the Fourth of July?': The History of Frederick Douglass' Searing Independence Day Oration

    American abolitionist Frederick Douglass, circa 1855. Library of Congress—Getty Images

    BY OLIVIA B. WAXMAN

    UPDATED: JUNE 26, 2020 2:40 PM EDT | ORIGINALLY PUBLISHED: JULY 3, 2019 11:00 AM EDT

    A

    merica has been working to fully live up to the ideals laid out in the Declaration of Independence ever since the document was printed on July 4, 1776. So while the U.S. tends to go all out celebrating freedom on the Fourth of July, alternate independence commemorations held a day later often draw attention to a different side of that story, with readings of the Frederick Douglass speech best known today as “What to the Slave is the Fourth of July?”

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    The speech was originally delivered at a moment when the country was fiercely locked in debate over the question of slavery, but there’s a reason why it has remained famous more than 150 years after emancipation, says David Blight, author of the 2019 Pulitzer Prize winning biography Frederick Douglass: Prophet of Freedom.

    To some, celebrations of American independence on July 4 are a reminder of the country’s hypocrisy on the matter of freedom, as slavery played a key role in the nation’s history; even today, America’s history of racism is still being written, while other forms of modern-day slavery persist in the U.S. and around the world. For those who feel that way, July 5 may be an easier day to celebrate: on that day in 1827, 4,000 African Americans paraded down Broadway in New York City to celebrate the end of slavery in their state.

    One person who felt that way was Douglass, the famous abolitionist, who was himself born into slavery. When the Ladies Anti-Slavery Society of Rochester, N.Y., invited Douglass to give a July 4 speech in 1852, Douglass opted to speak on July 5 instead.

    Addressing an audience of about 600 at the newly constructed Corinthian Hall, he started out by acknowledging that the signers of the Declaration of Independence were “brave” and “great” men, and that the way they wanted the Republic to look was in the right spirit. But, he said, speaking more than a decade before slavery was ended nationally, a lot of work still needed to be done so that all citizens can enjoy “life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.” Above “your national, tumultuous joy” — the July 4th celebrations of white Americans — were the “mournful wails of millions” whose heavy chains “are, today, rendered more intolerable by the jubilee shouts that reach them.”

    In the oration’s most famous passages, Douglass discussed what it felt like to see such festivities and to know independence was not a given for people like him:

    What have I, or those I represent, to do with your national independence? Are the great principles of political freedom and of natural justice, embodied in that Declaration of Independence, extended to us? and am I, therefore, called upon to bring our humble offering to the national altar, and to confess the benefits and express devout gratitude for the blessings resulting from your independence to us?…

    I say it with a sad sense of the disparity between us. I am not included within the pale of glorious anniversary! Your high independence only reveals the immeasurable distance between us. The blessings in which you, this day, rejoice, are not enjoyed in common. The rich inheritance of justice, liberty, prosperity and independence, bequeathed by your fathers, is shared by you, not by me. The sunlight that brought light and healing to you, has brought stripes and death to me. This Fourth July is yours, not mine. You may rejoice, I must mourn…

    What, to the American slave, is your 4th of July? I answer; a day that reveals to him, more than all other days in the year, the gross injustice and cruelty to which he is the constant victim. To him, your celebration is a sham; your boasted liberty, an unholy license; your national greatness, swelling vanity; your sounds of rejoicing are empty and heartless; your denunciation of tyrants, brass fronted impudence; your shouts of liberty and equality, hollow mockery; your prayers and hymns, your sermons and thanksgivings, with all your religious parade and solemnity, are, to Him, mere bombast, fraud, deception, impiety, and hypocrisy — a thin veil to cover up crimes which would disgrace a nation of savages. There is not a nation on the earth guilty of practices more shocking and bloody than are the people of the United States, at this very hour.

    Douglass’ speech also foreshadowed the bloody reckoning to come: Civil War. “For it is not light that is needed, but fire; it is not the gentle shower, but thunder,” he said. “We need the storm, the whirlwind, and the earthquake.”

    Get your history fix in one place: sign up for the weekly TIME History newsletter

    At the time Douglass spoke, Blight says, the opportunity was ripe for a lecture on the moral crisis.

    “Uncle Tom’s Cabin had just been published that spring and was taking the country by storm. The country was in the midst of crises over fugitive slave rescues in the wake of the Fugitive Slave Act of 1850. The political party system was beginning to tear itself asunder over the expansion of slavery,” he says. “It’s also an election year; the 1852 presidential election was heating up that summer. The Nativist party is rising. It’s an extraordinary political moment.”

    Source : time.com

    Frederick Douglass, 1818

    Narrative of the life of Frederick Douglass, an American slave, by Frederick Douglass, 1818-1895

    About | Collections | Authors | Titles | Subjects | Geographic | K-12 | Facebook  | Buy DocSouth Books

    Narrative

    of the Life of Frederick Douglass,

    an American Slave. Written by Himself:

    Electronic Edition.

    Frederick Douglass, 1818-1895

    Funding from the National Endowment for the Humanities

    supported the electronic publication of this title.

    Text scanned (OCR) by Sarah Reuning

    Images scanned by Carlene Hempel

    Text encoded by Carlene Hempel and Natalia Smith

    First edition, 1999 ca. 300K

    Academic Affairs Library, UNC-CH

    University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill,

    1999.

    Call number E 449 D746 1845 (Murrey Atkins Library, UNC-Charlotte)

    The electronic edition is a part of the UNC-CH digitization project,

    Any hyphens occurring in line breaks have been removed, and the trailing part of a word has been joined to the preceding line.

    All quotation marks and ampersand have been transcribed as entity references.

    All double right and left quotation marks are encoded as " and " respectively.

    All single right and left quotation marks are encoded as ' and ' respectively.

    Indentation in lines has not been preserved.

    Running titles have not been preserved.

    Spell-check and verification made against printed text using Author/Editor (SoftQuad) and Microsoft Word spell check programs.

    Library of Congress Subject Headings, 21st edition, 1998

    LC Subject Headings:

    Douglass, Frederick, 1818-1895.

    African Americans -- Maryland -- Biography.

    African American abolitionists -- Biography.

    Abolitionists -- United States -- Biography.

    Slaves -- Maryland -- Biography.

    Fugitive slaves -- Maryland -- Biography.

    Slavery -- Maryland -- History -- 19th century.

    Slavery -- United States -- History -- 19th century.

    Plantation life -- Maryland -- History -- 19th century.

    Slaves -- Maryland -- Social conditions -- 19th century.

    Slaves' writings, American -- Maryland.

    1999-03-17,

    Celine Noel and Wanda Gunther

    revised TEIHeader and created catalog record for the electronic edition.

    1999-02-26,

    Natalia Smith, project manager,

    finished TEI-conformant encoding and final proofing.

    1999-02-19, Carlene Hempel

    finished TEI/SGML encoding

    1999-01-29, Sarah Reuning

    finished scanning (OCR) and proofing.

    NARRATIVE

    OF THE LIFE OF FREDERICK DOUGLASS, AN AMERICAN SLAVE.

    WRITTEN BY HIMSELF.

    BOSTON:

    PUBLISHED AT THE ANTI-SLAVERY OFFICE,

    No. 25 CORNHILL 1845. Page verso

    Entered, according to Act of Congress, in the year 1845,

    BY FREDERERICK DOUGLASS,

    In the Clerk's Office of the District Court of Massachusetts.

    Page iii

    PREFACE.

    IN the month of August, 1841, I attended an antislavery convention in Nantucket, at which it was my happiness to become acquainted with FREDERICK DOUGLASS, the writer of the following Narrative. He was a stranger to nearly every member of that body; but, having recently made his escape from the southern prison-house of bondage, and feeling his curiosity excited to ascertain the principles and measures of the abolitionists,--of whom he had heard a somewhat vague description while he was a slave,--he was induced to give his attendance, on the occasion alluded to, though at that time a resident in New Bedford.

    Fortunate, most fortunate occurrence!--fortunate for the millions of his manacled brethren, yet panting for deliverance from their awful thraldom!--fortunate for the cause of negro emancipation, and of universal liberty!--fortunate for the land of his birth, which he has already done so much to save and bless!--fortunate for a large circle of friends and acquaintances, whose sympathy and affection he has strongly secured by the many sufferings he has endured, by his virtuous traits of character, by his ever-abiding remembrance of those who are in bonds, as being bound with them! --fortunate for the multitudes, in various parts of our republic, whose minds he has enlightened on the subject of slavery, and who have been melted to tears by his pathos, or roused to virtuous indignation by his stirring eloquence against the enslavers of men!--fortunate for himself, as it at once brought him into the

    Page iv

    field of public usefulness, "gave the world assurance of a MAN," quickened the slumbering energies of his soul, and consecrated him to the great work of breaking the rod of the oppressor, and letting the oppressed go free!

    I shall never forget his first speech at the convention--the extraordinary emotion it excited in my own mind--the powerful impression it created upon a crowded auditory, completely taken by surprise--the applause which followed from the beginning to the end of his felicitous remarks. I think I never hated slavery so intensely as at that moment; certainly, my perception of the enormous outrage which is inflicted by it, on the godlike nature of its victims, was rendered far more clear than ever. There stood one, in physical proportion and stature commanding and exact--in intellect richly endowed--in natural eloquence a prodigy--in soul manifestly "created but a little lower than the angels"--yet a slave, ay, a fugitive slave,--trembling for his safety, hardly daring to believe that on the American soil, a single white person could be found who would befriend him at all hazards, for the love of God and humanity! Capable of high attainments as an intellectual and moral being--needing nothing but a comparatively small amount of cultivation to make him an ornament to society and a blessing to his race--by the law of the land, by the voice of the people, by the terms of the slave code, he was only a piece of property, a beast of burden, a chattel personal, nevertheless!

    Source : docsouth.unc.edu

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