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    Are Business Support Groups Non Market Stakeholders?

    Investors located outside of a company have not vested interests in the company. If the company succeeds or fails, stakeholders may also be affected. Public, political, business, media, and others stakeholders come together under this group. Table of contents are business support groups stakeholders? who are the 4 stakeholders in a business? what are the 8 different groups of business stakeholders? who are the 5 main stakeholders in a business? what type of stakeholders include community government non governmental organizations...

    BUSINESS

    Are Business Support Groups Non Market Stakeholders? 

    Elaine, 5 months ago 4 min 79

    Investors located outside of a company have not vested interests in the company. If the company succeeds or fails, stakeholders may also be affected. Public, political, business, media, and others stakeholders come together under this group.

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    Table of contents

    are business support groups stakeholders?

    who are the 4 stakeholders in a business?

    what are the 8 different groups of business stakeholders?

    who are the 5 main stakeholders in a business?

    what type of stakeholders include community government non governmental organizations and business support groups?

    what is non stakeholder?

    are consumers market stakeholders?

    what are the types of stakeholders?

    what are the 4 stakeholder groups?

    what are business stakeholders?

    what are the stakeholder groups?

    what are the 10 stakeholders?

    what are the 9 stakeholders?

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    Are Business Support Groups Stakeholders?

    Other stakeholders include investors and shareholders as well as the media. Companies have the potential to increase revenue if they are dissatisfied with their business plans or their direction.

    Who Are The 4 Stakeholders In A Business?

    Business stakeholders include employees, shareholders, customers, suppliers, and others. In addition to shareholders and employees of the company, there are others that are independent entities within the firm.

    What Are The 8 Different Groups Of Business Stakeholders?

    The top ten customers are the ones who need value for their money.

    Number 2 Employees: Income, safety.

    A third investor is a financier…

    Vendors and Suppliers are important because of Revenue…

    # 5: Health, safety, economic growth are priorities for communities…

    Government.Taxation, GDP, and stake.

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    Who Are The 5 Main Stakeholders In A Business?

    Customers comprise a major stakeholder, which is a direct result of the company and its success.

    Employed employees are always better….

    Government: a group of people who are concerned with the well-being of society…

    …investors and shareholders are essential.

    The communities that surround us.

    There are suppliers as well as vendors.

    What Type Of Stakeholders Include Community Government Non Governmental Organizations And Business Support Groups?

    Aside from the general public, nonmarket stakeholders also fall into the category of local governments, nonprofit organizations, the media, business support groups, and competition.

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    What Is Non Stakeholder?

    There are differences between market and nonmarket stakeholders. Each nonmarket stakeholder has any voluntary interaction with the corporation. As a provider of goods, the company depends only on its own market to conduct business. The stakeholders in a market are the suppliers, consumers, shareholders, lenders, and workers.

    Are Consumers Market Stakeholders?

    An investment partner is an important stakeholder whose interests may influence or affect the performance or operations of an investment company. Investors, employees, customers, suppliers, communities, governments, or trade associations are typically responsible for the stakeholders.

    What Are The Types Of Stakeholders?

    Customers and product quality, to a great extent, are very important in a business. Customers play a significant role because their availability and quality impacts the profitability of the company as well as their purchase.

    Are you investing?…

    There are many employees who make up our workforce.

    Here in the community.

    … and our partners… … government…

    Consider expectations.

    Set expectations according to them.

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    What Are The 4 Stakeholder Groups?

    UPIG stands for users, providers, influencers and governance, so it is easy for one to remember all of these four stakeholders.

    What Are Business Stakeholders?

    ISO 26000 defines stakeholders as individuals and groups interested in taking part in organization decisions, including decisions about the future of a corporation. A non-governmental organization (NGO) can also have stakeholders as well as purchasing parties, clients, owners, and owners.

    What Are The Stakeholder Groups?

    Individuals or entities such as investors, employees, customers, suppliers, communities, governments, or trade associations are key stakeholders. stakeholders are not just internal to a company.

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    What Are The 10 Stakeholders?

    Make sure you are a supplier.

    Owners.

    Investors are what we call the “people”.

    The debts of creditors.

    Communities build lives.

    The unions represent trade workers.

    It is the job of employees to do their job.

    agencies of the government.

    What Are The 9 Stakeholders?

    Entrepreneurs. The people who own businesses.

    As creditor, they generally do not have disputes regarding the accuracy or availability of financial information in the business.

    …impacted by your business. We refer to the communities that have been affected.

    Source : bostinnovation.com

    Stakeholder (corporate)

    Stakeholder (corporate)

    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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    For other uses, see Stakeholder (disambiguation).

    In a corporation, a stakeholder is a member of "groups without whose support the organization would cease to exist",[1] as defined in the first usage of the word in a 1963 internal memorandum at the Stanford Research Institute. The theory was later developed and championed by R. Edward Freeman in the 1980s. Since then it has gained wide acceptance in business practice and in theorizing relating to strategic management, corporate governance, business purpose and corporate social responsibility (CSR). The definition of corporate responsibilities through a classification of stakeholders to consider has been criticized as creating a false dichotomy between the "shareholder model" and the "stakeholders model"[2] or a false analogy of the obligations towards shareholders and other interested parties.[3]

    Contents

    1 Types

    2 In corporate responsibility

    3 In management

    4 Stakeholder theory

    5 Examples of a company's stakeholders

    6 See also 7 Citations 8 References

    Types[edit]

    Any action taken by any organization or any group might affect those people who are linked with them in the private sector. For examples these are parents, children, customers, owners, employees, associates, partners, contractors, and suppliers, people that are related or located nearby. Broadly speaking there are three types of stakeholders:

    Primary stakeholders are usually internal stakeholders, are those that engage in economic transactions with the business (for example stockholders, customers, suppliers, creditors, and employees).Secondary stakeholders are usually external stakeholders, although they do not engage in direct economic exchange with the business – are affected by or can affect its actions (for example the general public, communities, activist groups, business support groups, and the media).Excluded stakeholders are those such as children or the disinterested public, originally as they had no economic impact on business. Now as the concept takes an anthropocentric perspective, while some groups like the general public may be recognized as stakeholders others remain excluded. Such a perspective does not give plants, animals or even geology a voice as stakeholders, but only an instrumental value in relation to human groups or individuals.

    A narrow mapping of a company's stakeholders might identify the following stakeholders:[4]

    Employees Communities Shareholders Creditors Investors Government Customers Owners Financiers Managers

    A broader mapping of a company's stakeholders may also include:[]

    Suppliers Distributors Labor unions

    Government regulatory agencies

    Government legislative bodies

    Government tax-collecting agencies

    Industry trade groups

    Professional associations

    NGOs and other advocacy groups

    Prospective employees

    Prospective customers

    Local communities

    National communities

    Public at Large (Global Community)

    Competitors Schools Future generations Analysts and Media Research centers

    In corporate responsibility[edit]

    In the field of corporate governance and corporate responsibility, a debate[5][6] is ongoing about whether the firm or company should be managed primarily for stakeholders, stockholders (shareholders), customers, or others.[7] Proponents in favor of stakeholders may base their arguments on the following four key assertions:

    Value can best be created by trying to maximize joint outcomes. For example, according to this thinking, programs that satisfy both employees' needs and stockholders' wants are doubly valuable because they address two legitimate sets of stakeholders at the same time. There is evidence that the combined effects of such a policy are not only additive but even multiplicative. For instance, by simultaneously addressing customer wishes in addition to employee and stockholder interests, both of the latter two groups also benefit from increased sales.

    Supporters also take issue with the preeminent role given to stockholders by many business thinkers, especially in the past. The argument is that debt holders, employees, and suppliers also make contributions and thus also take risks in creating a successful firm.

    These normative arguments would matter little if stockholders (shareholders) had complete control in guiding the firm. However, many believe that due to certain kinds of board of directors structures, top managers like CEOs are mostly in control of the firm.

    The greatest value of a company is its image and brand. By attempting to fulfill the needs and wants of many different people ranging from the local population and customers to their own employees and owners, companies can prevent damage to their image and brand, prevent losing large amounts of sales and disgruntled customers, and prevent costly legal expenses. While the stakeholder view has an increased cost, many firms have decided that the concept improves their image, increases sales, reduces the risks of liability for corporate negligence, and makes them less likely to be targeted by pressure groups, campaigning groups and NGOs.

    Source : en.wikipedia.org

    stakeholder

    stakeholder, any individual, social group, or actor who possesses an interest, a legal obligation, a moral right, or other concern in the decisions or outcomes of an organization, typically a business firm, corporation, or government. Stakeholders either affect or are affected by the achievement of an organization’s objectives. In a corporate context, the term stakeholder was introduced in the 1960s by the Stanford Research Institute (SRI) as a generalization of the terms stockholder or shareholder. SRI’s work was focused on firms, and the stakeholder concept was focused on the firm’s most closely related actors. From the mid-1980s, the meaning of

    stakeholder

    organizational element

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    stakeholder, any individual, social group, or actor who possesses an interest, a legal obligation, a moral right, or other concern in the decisions or outcomes of an organization, typically a business firm, corporation, or government. Stakeholders either affect or are affected by the achievement of an organization’s objectives.

    In a corporate context, the term stakeholder was introduced in the 1960s by the Stanford Research Institute (SRI) as a generalization of the terms stockholder or shareholder. SRI’s work was focused on firms, and the stakeholder concept was focused on the firm’s most closely related actors. From the mid-1980s, the meaning of the concept was stretched through the development of its social and political dimensions, making it a key concept for governance in general.

    Stakeholder theory and analysis

    Stakeholder theory proposes that stakeholding has a dual instrumental-normative quality. On one hand, incorporating stakeholders’ participation enhances the organization’s management capabilities in a globalized context characterized by increasing socioeconomic interconnectivity. On the other hand, promoting plurality and inclusivity and recognizing the intrinsic value of stakeholders’ interests makes it morally superior (e.g., in terms of democracy and social justice) to traditional managerial approaches based on the mere optimization of shareholders’ gains.

    In more practical terms, stakeholder theory seeks to describe and examine the connections between stakeholder legitimate interests, stakeholder management practices, and the achievement of the goals of an organization. This examination should lead to a better understanding of needs of stakeholders in order to set the bounds of operation and the formulation of recommendations for increasing governance efficiency.

    Stakeholder analysis typically consists of the systematic identification and characterization of the most relevant stakeholders for an organization or initiative—that is, those stakeholders exerting, or trying to exert, influence on the company’s decisions and activities. Stakeholders with similar interests, claims, or rights can be classified into different categories according to their roles (e.g., employees, shareholders, customers, suppliers, regulators, or nongovernmental organizations). In corporate governance, stakeholders are often classified into primary or secondary groups. Primary stakeholders are fundamental for the firm’s operation and survival. Such stakeholders include owners, investors, employees, suppliers, customers, and competitors, as well as nature (physical resources and carrying capacity). Secondary stakeholders are those influenced by the firm’s operations but not directly engaged in transactions with the firm and consequently not essential for its survival. Examples of secondary stakeholders are local communities and local business support groups. Secondary stakeholders can be of high strategic importance for the success of particular operations and activities of a company. A second methodological step consists of determining the stake of a stakeholder. Stakes and groups can be categorized as threats and opportunities that build a stakeholder strategy matrix.

    Business literature has focused heavily on assessing the differential threats caused by primary and secondary stakeholders. A major purpose of these developments is to help corporate managers understand their stakeholder environments and manage their relationships with external actors more effectively (e.g., by reducing unnecessary conflict). Through stakeholder analysis, corporate managers can improve the social value of the outcomes of their actions and minimize the disservice to, and from, stakeholders. Thus, stakeholder theory would provide tools for equipping managers to develop more effective relationships with the company’s environment (e.g., by reducing the firm’s vulnerability to stakeholder opposition).

    Stakeholder analysis is also used for policy analysis, project management, and the generation of multistakeholder processes for participatory public decision making. Public institutions can be interested in generating multistakeholder initiatives in order to avoid conflict, gain legitimacy, and deepen democracy. However, in the context of public policy, the objectives of stakeholder analysis and management are related not only to the instrumental interests of public institutions but also to the common good and the reaching of fair decisions (e.g., by giving marginalized stakeholders a significant voice). Multistakeholder processes are associated with styles of governance that promote higher transparency, openness, and extended participation in public policy.

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    Finally, stakeholder participation has been proposed in the context of decisions characterized by high risks, uncertainty, and complexity. In these contexts, purely technocratic approaches present fundamental limitations and may lead to misguided decisions. Stakeholders’ values can orient the type of scientific information (e.g., among several disciplines) that is more relevant for each decision. The identification of these values can facilitate the weighting of the criteria for reaching more representative decisions. Therefore, the identification of relevant stakeholders and their values is a preliminary step in making complex decisions. For instance, key decisions affecting water quality issues would require the identification of everyone who has influence upon the quality of the water (e.g., polluting industries, municipalities, and farmers) and anyone who is impacted by the quality of the water (e.g., fishermen, consumers, and waterfront owners). According to a stakeholder approach, these people are said to have a stake in any decision affecting water quality, and their involvement is considered crucial for water governance.

    Source : www.britannica.com

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