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    what river did texas and president polk regard as the texas-mexico border?

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    Doc B: What river did Texas and President Polk regard as the Texas-Mexico border?

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    The Del Norte (Rio Grande)

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    Doc B: Would Mexico have viewed as Mexican advance north of the Rio Grande an invasion of the US?

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    Mexico regarded the land north of the Rio Grande all the way to the Nueces to be Mexico. It was not an invasion. It was an act to support their claim.

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    Terms in this set (17)

    Doc B: What river did Texas and President Polk regard as the Texas-Mexico border?

    The Del Norte (Rio Grande)

    Doc B: Would Mexico have viewed as Mexican advance north of the Rio Grande an invasion of the US?

    Mexico regarded the land north of the Rio Grande all the way to the Nueces to be Mexico. It was not an invasion. It was an act to support their claim.

    Doc B: Where did the April 24 fight between Mexican and American soldiers occur?

    On the north bank of the Rio in the disputed territory

    Doc B: What was the response of Congress to Polk's war message?

    Despite the Mexican-American skirmish occurring in disputed territory, President Polk won overwhelming support from both the Senate (40-2) and the House (174-14) for going to war.

    Doc B: How does this document help answer the Mini-Q question: Was the US justified in going to war with Mexico?

    Pro: Polk is making the case that Texas annexed itself to the US with the understanding that the Rio Grande was her southern border. The US is now bound to protect that southern Texas ground.

    Anti: this document is an example of a strained argument, especially when we know that Mexico never accepted the Texas secession or annexation.

    Doc C: Whose point of view is held by the author of the document?

    Jesus Velasco-Marquez, a Mexican point of view

    Doc C: How did the Mexican government feel about the annexation of Texas by the US?

    The Mexican government did not like Texas annexation by the US government. Many Mexicans did not accept the fact of Texas separation from Mexico. Annexation by the US seemed like theft.

    Doc C: According to the author, why did a Mexican force attack Zachary Taylor's troops when they arrived at the Rio Grande River?

    The Mexicans regarded Zachary Taylor's presence along the Rio Grande to be an invasion of Mexican Territory. As El Tiempo said, the Americans were like a bandit. They had to be stopped.

    Doc C: How does this document help answer the question: Was the US justified in going to war with Mexico?

    If one agrees with this viewpoint, then Polk's argument in Document B looks rather empty and calculating. Polk was not fighting to protect Americans on American soil, he was provoking the Mexican government into firing the first shot.

    What were the years of the Mexican American War?

    1846-1848

    What were the 3 causes of the US Mexican War?

    Manifest Destiny, Border Dispute, Annexation of TX to the US.

    What was major reason the war was fought?

    To obtain California from Mexico.

    Manifest Destiny

    Belief which American felt that God had ordained for us to spread. Sea to shinny sea

    Doc D:After achieving independence from Spain in 1821, did Mexico make slavery legal or illegal?

    Slavery was declared illegal in Mexico (which included the province of Texas).

    Doc D:Sumner mentions a "disgraceful robbery." Who robbed what from whom?

    The US was robbing Mexico of its northern province of Texas

    Doc D:Did Charles Sumner have the support of the people of Massachusetts? Provide evidence and explain your thinking.

    Yes. We learn in the document source line that the Massachusetts state legislature passed Sumner's Objections to the Mexican War. Since we know that the legislature was popularly elected, we can infer that Sumner had the support of the majority of white males in Massachusetts.

    Doc D:How does his document help answer the question: Was the US justified in going to war with Mexico?

    The document provides two reasons for not going to war with Mexico: 1) it would result in the expansion of slave territory in the US; 2) It was robbery to take another country's land

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    U.S. Declares War on Mexico

    The U.S. Congress votes in favor of President James K. Polk’s request to declare war on Mexico in a dispute over Texas, kicking off the Mexican-American War (1846-1848).

    THIS DAY IN HISTORY May May1 May2 May3 May4 May5 May6 May7 May8 May9 May10 May11 May12 May13 May14 May15 May16 May17 May18 May19 May20 May21 May22 May23 May24 May25 May26 May27 May28 May29 May30 May31 Year 1846 Month Day May 13

    U.S. Congress declares war on Mexico

    On May 13, 1846, the U.S. Congress overwhelmingly votes in favor of President James K. Polk’s request to declare war on Mexico in a dispute over Texas.

    Under the threat of war, the United States had refrained from annexing Texas after the latter won independence from Mexico in 1836. But in 1844, President John Tyler restarted negotiations with the Republic of Texas, culminating with a Treaty of Annexation. The treaty was defeated by a wide margin in the Senate because it would upset the slave state/free state balance between North and South and risked war with Mexico, which had broken off relations with the United States. But shortly before leaving office and with the support of President-elect Polk, Tyler managed to get the joint resolution passed on March 1, 1845. Texas was admitted to the Union on December 29.

    While Mexico didn’t follow through with its threat to declare war, relations between the two nations remained tense over border disputes, and in July 1845, President Polk ordered troops into disputed lands that lay between the Neuces and Rio Grande rivers. In November, Polk sent the diplomat John Slidell to Mexico to seek boundary adjustments in return for the U.S. government’s settlement of the claims of U.S. citizens against Mexico and also to make an offer to purchase California and New Mexico. After the mission failed, the U.S. army under Gen. Zachary Taylor advanced to the mouth of the Rio Grande, the river that the state of Texas claimed as its southern boundary.

    Mexico, claiming that the boundary was the Nueces River to the northeast of the Rio Grande, considered the advance of Taylor’s army an act of aggression and in April 1846 sent troops across the Rio Grande. Polk, in turn, declared the Mexican advance to be an invasion of U.S. soil, and on May 11, 1846, asked Congress to declare war on Mexico, which it did two days later.

    After nearly two years of fighting, peace was established by the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo, signed on February 2, 1848. The Rio Grande was made the southern boundary of Texas, and California and New Mexico were ceded to the United States. In return, the United States paid Mexico the sum of $15 million and agreed to settle all claims of U.S. citizens against Mexico.

    READ MORE: 10 Things You May Not Know About the Mexican-American War

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    Mexican–American War

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    Mexican–American War

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    Mexican–American War

    Clockwise from top Battle of Resaca de la Palma, U.S. victory at Churubusco outside of Mexico City, marines storming Chapultepec castle under a large U.S. flag, Battle of Cerro Gordo

    Date April 25, 1846 – February 2, 1848

    (1 year, 9 months, 1 week and 1 day)

    Location

    Texas, New Mexico, California; Northern, Central, and Eastern Mexico; Mexico City

    Result American victory

    Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo

    Mexican recognition of U.S. sovereignty over Texas (among other territories)

    End of the conflict between Mexico and Texas

    Territorial

    changes Mexican Cession

    Belligerents

    United States Mexico

    Commanders and leaders

    James K. Polk George Bancroft John E. Wool John Y. Mason William L. Marcy Winfield Scott Zachary Taylor Stephen W. Kearny John Sloat William Worth Robert F. Stockton Joseph Lane Franklin Pierce David Conner Matthew C. Perry John Frémont Thomas Childs Henry Burton

    Edward Dickinson Baker

    Robert E. Lee Henry Clay Jr  William Ide

    Antonio López de Santa Anna

    Mariano Paredes Manuel Peña Mariano Arista Pedro de Ampudia José Flores Mariano Vallejo Nicolás Bravo José de Herrera Andrés Pico Manuel Armijo

    Martin Perfecto de Cos

    Pedro de Anaya Agustín y Huarte Joaquín Rea Manuel Muñoz Gabriel Valencia  José de Urrea Juan Almonte Manuel Micheltorena Strength 73,532[1] 82,000[1]

    Casualties and losses

    1,733 killed[1] 4,152 wounded[2] 5,000 killed[1]

    Thousands wounded[1]

    4,000 civilians killed

    Including civilians killed by violence, military deaths from disease and accidental deaths, the Mexican death toll may have reached 25,000[1] and the American death toll exceeded 13,283.[3]

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    The Mexican–American War,[a] also known in the United States as the Mexican War and in Mexico as the (),[b] was an armed conflict between the United States and Mexico from 1846 to 1848. It followed the 1845 U.S. annexation of Texas, which Mexico considered Mexican territory since the Mexican government did not recognize the Velasco treaty signed by Mexican General Antonio López de Santa Anna when he was a prisoner of the Texian Army during the 1836 Texas Revolution. The Republic of Texas was an independent country, but most of its citizens wished to be annexed by the United States.[4] Domestic sectional politics in the U.S. were preventing annexation since Texas would have been a slave state, upsetting the balance of power between Northern free states and Southern slave states.[5] In the 1844 United States presidential election, Democrat James K. Polk was elected on a platform of expanding U.S. territory in Oregon and Texas. Polk advocated expansion by either peaceful means or armed force, with the 1845 annexation of Texas furthering that goal by peaceful means.[6] However, the boundary between Texas and Mexico was disputed, with the Republic of Texas and the U.S. asserting it to be the Rio Grande and Mexico claiming it to be the more-northern Nueces River. Both Mexico and the U.S. claimed the disputed area and sent troops. Polk sent U.S. Army troops to the area; he also sent a diplomatic mission to Mexico to try to negotiate the sale of territory. U.S. troops' presence was designed to lure Mexico into starting the conflict, putting the onus on Mexico and allowing Polk to argue to Congress that a declaration of war should be issued.[7] Mexican forces attacked U.S. forces, and the United States Congress declared war.[8]

    Beyond the disputed area of Texas, U.S. forces quickly occupied the regional capital of Santa Fe de Nuevo México along the upper Rio Grande, which had trade relations with the U.S. via the Santa Fe Trail between Missouri and New Mexico. U.S. forces also moved against the province of Alta California and then moved south. The Pacific Squadron of the U.S. Navy blockaded the Pacific coast farther south in the lower Baja California Territory. The Mexican government refused to be pressured into signing a peace treaty at this point, making the U.S. invasion of the Mexican heartland under Major General Winfield Scott and its capture of the capital Mexico City a strategy to force peace negotiations. Although Mexico was defeated on the battlefield, politically its government's negotiating a treaty remained a fraught issue, with some factions refusing to consider any recognition of its loss of territory. Although Polk formally relieved his peace envoy, Nicholas Trist, of his post as negotiator, Trist ignored the order and successfully concluded the 1848 Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo. It ended the war, and Mexico recognized the Mexican Cession, areas not part of disputed Texas but conquered by the U.S. Army. These were northern territories of Alta California and Santa Fe de Nuevo México. The U.S. agreed to pay $15 million for the physical damage of the war and assumed $3.25 million of debt already owed by the Mexican government to U.S. citizens. Mexico acknowledged the independence of what became the State of Texas and accepted the Rio Grande as its northern border with the United States.

    Source : en.wikipedia.org

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