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    what order shows increasing frequency for gamma rays, microwaves, visible light, and x-rays? gamma rays, x-rays, visible light, microwaves microwaves, visible light, x-rays, gamma rays visible light, gamma rays, microwaves, x-rays x-rays, microwaves, gamma rays, visible light

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    get what order shows increasing frequency for gamma rays, microwaves, visible light, and x-rays? gamma rays, x-rays, visible light, microwaves microwaves, visible light, x-rays, gamma rays visible light, gamma rays, microwaves, x-rays x-rays, microwaves, gamma rays, visible light from EN Bilgi.

    Arrange the following radiations in the order of their increasing wavelength: X

    Click here👆to get an answer to your question ✍️ Arrange the following radiations in the order of their increasing wavelength: X - rays, infra red rays, radio waves, gamma rays and micro waves.

    Arrange the following radiations in the order of their increasing wavelength:

    Question

    X-rays, infra red rays, radio waves, gamma rays and micro waves.

    A

    Gamma rays, X-rays, infra red rays, radio waves, micro waves.

    B

    Gamma rays, micro waves, X-rays, infra red rays, radio waves.

    C

    Gamma rays, infra red rays, X-rays, micro waves, radio waves.

    D

    Gamma rays, X-rays, infra red rays, micro waves, radio waves.

    Medium Open in App Solution Verified by Toppr

    Correct option is D)

    Electromagnetic radiation is classified into types according to the frequency of the wave. These types include, in order of increasing frequency, radio waves, microwaves, infrared radiation, visible light, ultraviolet radiation, X-rays and gamma rays.

    The frequency is the inverse of wavelength. Hence, in the order of increasing wavelength, the waves are Gamma rays (<1nm), X-rays (1-10 nm), infra red rays (700−10

    5

    nm), micro waves (10

    5 −10 8

    nm), radio waves (>10

    8 nm).

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    Source : www.toppr.com

    What is electromagnetic radiation?

    Electromagnetic radiation is a form of energy that includes radio waves, microwaves, X-rays and gamma rays, as well as visible light.

    What is electromagnetic radiation?

    By Jim Lucas Contributions from Adam Mann published March 22, 2022

    Electromagnetic radiation is a form of energy that includes radio waves, microwaves, X-rays and gamma rays, as well as visible light.

    Green dots show the locations of 186 gamma-ray bursts observed by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on NASA’s Fermi satellite during its first decade. Some noteworthy bursts are highlighted and labeled. Background: Constructed from nine years of LAT data, this map shows how the gamma-ray sky appears at energies above 10 billion electron volts. The plane of our Milky Way galaxy runs along the middle of the plot. Brighter colors indicate brighter gamma-ray sources. (Image credit: NASA/DOE/Fermi LAT Collaboration)

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    Parts of the electromagnetic spectrum

    Additional resources

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    Electromagnetic radiation is a type of energy that is all around us and takes many forms, such as radio waves, microwaves, X-rays and gamma-rays. Sunlight is also a form of electromagnetic energy, but visible light is only a small portion of the electromagnetic spectrum, which contains a broad range of wavelengths.

    WHEN WAS ELECTROMAGNETISM DISCOVERED?

    Electromagnetic waves are formed when an electric field (shown in red arrows) couples with a magnetic field (shown in blue arrows). Magnetic and electric fields of an electromagnetic wave are perpendicular to each other and to the direction of the wave. (Image credit: NOAA.)

    People have known about electricity and magnetism since ancient times, but the concepts were not well understood until the 19th century, according to a history from physicist Gary Bedrosian of the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in Troy, New York. In 1873, Scottish physicist James Clerk Maxwell showed that the two phenomena were connected and developed a unified theory of electromagnetism, according to Live Science sister site Space.com. The study of electromagnetism deals with how electrically charged particles interact with each other and with magnetic fields.

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    Maxwell developed a set of formulas, called Maxwell's equations, to describe the different interactions of electricity and magnetism. Though there were initially 20 equations, Maxwell later simplified them to just four basic ones. In simple terms, these four equations state the following:

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    The force of attraction or repulsion between electric charges is inversely proportional to the square of the distance between them.

    Magnetic poles come in pairs that attract and repel each other, much as electric charges do.

    An electric current in a wire produces a magnetic field whose direction depends on the direction of the current.

    A moving electric field produces a magnetic field, and vice versa.

    HOW IS ELECTROMAGNETISM CREATED?

    Electromagnetic radiation is created when a charged atomic particle, such as an electron, is accelerated by an electric field, causing it to move. The movement produces oscillating electric and magnetic fields, which travel at right angles to each other, according to an online physics and astronomy course from PhysLink.com. The waves have certain characteristics, given as frequency, wavelength or energy.

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    A wavelength is the distance between two consecutive peaks of a wave, according to the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR). This distance is given in meters or fractions thereof. Frequency is the number of waves that form in a given length of time. It is usually measured as the number of wave cycles per second, or hertz (Hz). A short wavelength means that the frequency will be higher because one cycle can pass in a shorter amount of time. Similarly, a longer wavelength has a lower frequency because each cycle takes longer to complete.

    WHAT ARE THE PARTS OF THE ELECTROMAGNETIC SPECTRUM?

    The electromagnetic spectrum, from highest to lowest frequency waves. The electromagnetic spectrum is generally divided into seven regions, in order of decreasing wavelength and increasing energy and frequency: radio waves, microwaves, infrared, visible light, ultraviolet, X-rays and gamma rays. (Image credit: Shutterstock)

    Electromagnetic radiation spans an enormous range of wavelengths and frequencies. This range is known as the electromagnetic spectrum, according to UCAR. The electromagnetic spectrum is generally divided into seven regions, in order of decreasing wavelength and increasing energy and frequency. The common designations are radio waves, microwaves, infrared (IR), visible light, ultraviolet (UV) light, X-rays and gamma-rays.

    Radio waves

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    Radio waves are at the lowest range of the electromagnetic spectrum, with frequencies of up to about 30 billion hertz, or 30 gigahertz (GHz), and wavelengths greater than about 0.4 inch (10 millimeters). Radio is used primarily for communications, including voice, data and entertainment media.

    Source : www.livescience.com

    Electromagnetic Spectrum

    Astronomer's Toolbox

    Electromagnetic Spectrum - Introduction

    Advanced Basic

    The Electromagnetic Spectrum

    The electromagnetic (EM) spectrum is the range of all types of EM radiation. Radiation is energy that travels and spreads out as it goes – the visible light that comes from a lamp in your house and the radio waves that come from a radio station are two types of electromagnetic radiation. The other types of EM radiation that make up the electromagnetic spectrum are microwaves, infrared light, ultraviolet light, X-rays and gamma-rays.

    You know more about the electromagnetic spectrum than you may think. The image below shows where you might encounter each portion of the EM spectrum in your day-to-day life.

    The electromagnetic spectrum from lowest energy/longest wavelength (at the top) to highest energy/shortest wavelength (at the bottom). (Credit: NASA's Imagine the Universe)

    Radio: Your radio captures radio waves emitted by radio stations, bringing your favorite tunes. Radio waves are also emitted by stars and gases in space.Microwave: Microwave radiation will cook your popcorn in just a few minutes, but is also used by astronomers to learn about the structure of nearby galaxies.Infrared: Night vision goggles pick up the infrared light emitted by our skin and objects with heat. In space, infrared light helps us map the dust between stars.Visible: Our eyes detect visible light. Fireflies, light bulbs, and stars all emit visible light.Ultraviolet: Ultraviolet radiation is emitted by the Sun and are the reason skin tans and burns. "Hot" objects in space emit UV radiation as well.X-ray: A dentist uses X-rays to image your teeth, and airport security uses them to see through your bag. Hot gases in the Universe also emit X-rays.Gamma ray: Doctors use gamma-ray imaging to see inside your body. The biggest gamma-ray generator of all is the Universe.

    Is a radio wave the same as a gamma ray?

    Are radio waves completely different physical objects than gamma-rays? They are produced in different processes and are detected in different ways, but they are not fundamentally different. Radio waves, gamma-rays, visible light, and all the other parts of the electromagnetic spectrum are electromagnetic radiation.

    Electromagnetic radiation can be described in terms of a stream of mass-less particles, called photons, each traveling in a wave-like pattern at the speed of light. Each photon contains a certain amount of energy. The different types of radiation are defined by the the amount of energy found in the photons. Radio waves have photons with low energies, microwave photons have a little more energy than radio waves, infrared photons have still more, then visible, ultraviolet, X-rays, and, the most energetic of all, gamma-rays.

    Measuring electromagnetic radiation

    Electromagnetic radiation can be expressed in terms of energy, wavelength, or frequency. Frequency is measured in cycles per second, or Hertz. Wavelength is measured in meters. Energy is measured in electron volts. Each of these three quantities for describing EM radiation are related to each other in a precise mathematical way. But why have three ways of describing things, each with a different set of physical units?

    Comparison of wavelength, frequency and energy for the electromagnetic spectrum. (Credit: NASA's Imagine the Universe)

    The short answer is that scientists don't like to use numbers any bigger or smaller than they have to. It is much easier to say or write "two kilometers" than "two thousand meters." Generally, scientists use whatever units are easiest for the type of EM radiation they work with.

    Astronomers who study radio waves tend to use wavelengths or frequencies. Most of the radio part of the EM spectrum falls in the range from about 1 cm to 1 km, which is 30 gigahertz (GHz) to 300 kilohertz (kHz) in frequencies. The radio is a very broad part of the EM spectrum.

    Infrared and optical astronomers generally use wavelength. Infrared astronomers use microns (millionths of a meter) for wavelengths, so their part of the EM spectrum falls in the range of 1 to 100 microns. Optical astronomers use both angstroms (0.00000001 cm, or 10-8 cm) and nanometers (0.0000001 cm, or 10-7 cm). Using nanometers, violet, blue, green, yellow, orange, and red light have wavelengths between 400 and 700 nanometers. (This range is just a tiny part of the entire EM spectrum, so the light our eyes can see is just a little fraction of all the EM radiation around us.)

    The wavelengths of ultraviolet, X-ray, and gamma-ray regions of the EM spectrum are very small. Instead of using wavelengths, astronomers that study these portions of the EM spectrum usually refer to these photons by their energies, measured in electron volts (eV). Ultraviolet radiation falls in the range from a few electron volts to about 100 eV. X-ray photons have energies in the range 100 eV to 100,000 eV (or 100 keV). Gamma-rays then are all the photons with energies greater than 100 keV.

    Show me a chart of the wavelength, frequency, and energy regimes of the spectrum

    Why do we put telescopes in orbit?

    Source : imagine.gsfc.nasa.gov

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