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    what occurs when the northern hemisphere experiences spring and the southern hemisphere experiences fall? the sun is directly overhead in the northern hemisphere. the southern hemisphere receives more direct rays from the sun. the northern and southern hemispheres get the same amount of energy from the sun. the northern hemisphere receives more daylight hours than the southern hemisphere.

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    get what occurs when the northern hemisphere experiences spring and the southern hemisphere experiences fall? the sun is directly overhead in the northern hemisphere. the southern hemisphere receives more direct rays from the sun. the northern and southern hemispheres get the same amount of energy from the sun. the northern hemisphere receives more daylight hours than the southern hemisphere. from EN Bilgi.

    Earth/Space Science

    Start studying Earth/Space Science - Factors that Affect Climate. Learn vocabulary, terms, and more with flashcards, games, and other study tools.

    Earth/Space Science - Factors that Affect Climate

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    During the entire month of June, temperatures increase in the Northern Hemisphere and decrease in the Southern Hemisphere.

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    The north end of Earth's axis is tilted toward the Sun.

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    Why does the Northern Hemisphere experience spring in March, while the Southern Hemisphere experiences fall?

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    The Northern and Southern Hemispheres get the same amount of energy from the Sun in March.

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    Terms in this set (21)

    During the entire month of June, temperatures increase in the Northern Hemisphere and decrease in the Southern Hemisphere.

    The north end of Earth's axis is tilted toward the Sun.

    Why does the Northern Hemisphere experience spring in March, while the Southern Hemisphere experiences fall?

    The Northern and Southern Hemispheres get the same amount of energy from the Sun in March.

    Why does a coastal area have less variation in temperature than a noncoastal area?

    The temperatures on land change more rapidly than temperatures on water.

    Which statement describes the impact of ocean currents on climate?

    Ocean currents create changes in the temperature of air over land masses.

    Which factors contribute to the formation of polar, temperate, and tropical zones? Check all that apply.

    the angle of the Sun's rays

    the amount of daylight in a region

    What causes the cycle of seasons on Earth?

    the tilt of Earth's axis

    What happens when the south end of Earth's axis is tilted toward the Sun?

    The Southern Hemisphere experiences summer.

    Which season occurs in the Northern Hemisphere when the Sun is at its lowest point in the sky?

    winter

    Why are temperatures more moderate around the fall and spring equinoxes?

    Neither end of Earth's axis is tilted toward the Sun.

    What indicates that an area in the Northern Hemisphere is experiencing summer?

    The Sun is directly over Earth's north end.

    During which months do both the Northern and Southern Hemispheres receive the same amount of energy from the Sun? Check all that apply.

    March September

    What happens during the fall in September?

    The Sun's rays are not as concentrated as in summer.

    Which statements describe solstices? Check all that apply.

    They occur when the Sun reaches its highest or lowest point in the sky.

    They affect the amount of sunlight in the Northern Hemisphere in June.

    They influence the cycling of different seasons based on the Sun's height in the sky.

    Which statement describes the weather and climate in a tropical region?

    The angle of the Sun's rays affects daylight hours, creating warm temperatures all year.

    How does latitude affect climate?

    Latitude determines the duration of daylight hours.

    Which statement best describes how the distance from a large river affects an area’s climate in the summer?

    Regions near rivers experience winds from the water that prevent extreme temperature changes.

    Riley lives near a polar zone, where it is cold. He visits his friend Thalia, who lives in a tropical zone, where it is warm all year. They live at similar elevations, and neither lives in a coastal area.

    What causes the differences in climate where Riley and Thalia live?

    latitude

    Which statements describe the influence of latitude on temperature? Check all that apply.

    Latitude determines the duration of daylight.

    Latitude creates polar and temperate zones.

    In what ways do prevailing winds affect precipitation in a region? Check all that apply.

    Prevailing winds influence wind movement from large bodies of water.

    Prevailing winds cause huge air masses, both warm and cool, to move.

    Prevailing winds controls the amount of water vapor in the air masses.

    In what ways do coastal mountains affect a region's climate? Check all that apply.

    They increase precipitation on the windward sides of mountain ranges.

    They force cool, moist air from oceans to rise as they move toward land.

    They decrease precipitation totals on the leeward sides of mountain ranges.

    How do prevailing winds control precipitation totals in a region? Check all that apply.

    They cause oceanic winds to carry water vapor.

    They move warm air masses in certain directions.

    They affect the movement of winds that come from oceans.

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    Sky Tellers

    Sky Tellers - Seasons

    LPI | Education

    SkyTellers Seasons activities for young children

    See also: Middle school Seasons activities and resources

    About Our Seasons

    What causes our seasons?

    We have seasons because Earth's axis – the imaginary line that goes through the Earth and around which the Earth spins — is tilted. It's tilted about 23.5 degrees relative to our plane of orbit (the ecliptic) around the Sun. As we orbit our Sun, our axis always points to the same fixed location in space. Our northern axis points almost directly toward Polaris, the North Star.

    This picture shows Earth from its side as it orbits our Sun. The axis is tilted and points to the North Star no matter where Earth is in its orbit. Because of this, the distribution of the Sun's rays changes. In June, in the northern hemisphere summer, the Sun's rays — and warmth — reach all the way to the north pole. In December, in the northern hemisphere winter, the north pole is tilted away from the incoming sunshine.

    The “fixed” tilt means that, during our orbit around our Sun each year, different parts of Earth receive sunlight for different lengths of time. It also means that the angle at which sunlight strikes different parts of Earth's surface changes through the year. Sunlight striking the surface at an angle is “spread” across a wider area compared to sunlight striking perpendicular to Earth's surface. Areas that receive more scattered sunlight receive less energy from our Sun. All of these factors combine to give Earth its annual cycle of seasons!

    For part of our orbit the northern half of Earth is tilted toward the Sun. This is summer in the northern hemisphere; there are longer periods of daylight, the Sun is higher in the sky, and the Sun's rays strike the surface more directly, giving us warmer temperatures. The north pole is in constant daylight!

    When the northern half of Earth is tilted toward the Sun, the southern hemisphere is tilted away. People in the southern hemisphere experience the shorter day lengths and colder temperatures of winter.

    During winter in the northern hemisphere, our northern axis continues to point to the North Star, but, because we have moved in our orbit around the Sun, our northern hemisphere now points away from our Sun. The north pole is completely dark and other places in the northern hemisphere experience the shorter day lengths and colder temperatures of winter as the Sun traces a lower arc across the southern sky and the Sun's rays strike the surface at a lower angle. When it is winter in the northern half of Earth, the southern hemisphere, tilted toward our Sun, has summer.

    During fall and spring, some locations on Earth experience similar, milder, conditions. Earth has moved to a position in its orbit where its axis is more or less perpendicular to the incoming rays of the Sun. The durations of daylight and darkness are more equally distributed across all latitudes of the globe.

    What doesn't cause the seasons?

    The seasons are not caused by how far Earth is from our Sun. Earth's orbit around our Sun has a slightly elliptical path (very slight!), and the Sun is not exactly in the center of the ellipse. This means that, during the year, Earth is sometimes farther from our Sun, and sometimes closer — but the difference is small (not so for some other planets!). Earth is closest to our Sun in January (perihelion) and the farthest away in July (Earth is 147.5 million kilometers from the Sun when it reaches aphelion). If distance were the most important factor, the entire Earth would have summer in January when we are closest to our Sun and winter in July when we are farthest away!

    What are solstices and equinoxes?

    Solstices occur when Earth's axis is pointed directly toward our Sun. This happens twice a year during Earth's orbit. Near June 21 the north pole is tilted 23.5 degrees toward our Sun and the northern hemisphere experiences summer solstice, the longest day of the northern hemisphere year. On that same day, the southern hemisphere is tilted 23.5 degrees away from our Sun and the southern regions of Earth experience the shortest day of the year — the winter solstice.

    The second solstice occurs on December 21 or 22 when the north pole is tilting 23.5 degrees away from our Sun and the south pole is inclined toward it. This is the shortest day of the year in the northern hemisphere — the northern hemisphere winter solstice.

    Twice each year, during the equinoxes (“equal nights”), Earth's axis is not pointed toward our Sun, but is perpendicular to the incoming rays. During the equinoxes every location on our Earth (except the extreme poles) experiences 12 hours of daylight and 12 hours of darkness. The vernal or spring equinox occurs in the northern hemisphere on March 21 or 22 (the fall equinox of the southern hemisphere). September 22 or 23 marks the northern hemisphere autumnal or fall equinox.

    National Maritime Museum

    As Earth orbits our Sun, the position of its axis relative to the Sun changes. This results in a change in the observed height of our Sun above the horizon. For any given location on Earth, our Sun is observed to trace a higher path above the horizon in the summer, and a lower path in the winter. During spring and fall, it traces an intermediate path. This means that our Sun takes a greater amount of time tocross the sky in the summer and a shorter amount of time in the winter. This effect is greater as you move toward the poles; people living near the equator experience only small changes in daylight during the year. The change is more extreme toward the poles.

    Source : www.lpi.usra.edu

    The Seasons, the Equinox, and the Solstices

    Cleveland, OH

    Weather Forecast Office

    The Seasons, the Equinox, and the Solstices

    Weather.gov > Cleveland, OH > The Seasons, the Equinox, and the Solstices

    Current Hazards Current Conditions Radar Forecasts Rivers and Lakes

    Climate and Past Weather

    Local Programs

    The Equinox (Vernal & Autumnal)

    There are only two times of the year when the Earth's axis is tilted neither toward nor away from the sun, resulting in a "nearly" equal amount of daylight and darkness at all latitudes. These events are referred to as Equinoxes.The word equinox is derived from two Latin words - aequus (equal) and nox (night). At the equator, the sun is directly overhead at noon on these two equinoxes.  The "nearly" equal hours of day and night is due to refraction of sunlight or a bending of the light's rays that causes the sun to appear above the horizon when the actual position of the sun is below the horizon.  Additionally, the days become a little longer at the higher latitudes (those at a distance from the equator) because it takes the sun longer to rise and set.  Therefore, on the equinox and for several days before and after the equinox, the length of day will range from about 12 hours and six and one-half minutes at the equator, to 12 hours and 8 minutes at 30 degrees latitude, to 12 hours and 16 minutes at 60 degrees latitude.

    The Solstices (Summer & Winter)

    The summer solstice occurs at the moment the earth's tilt toward from the sun is at a maximum. Therefore, on the day of the summer solstice, the sun appears at its highest elevation with a noontime position that changes very little for several days before and after the summer solstice.  The summer solstice occurs when the sun is directly over the Tropic of Cancer, which is located at 23.5° latitude North, and runs through Mexico, the Bahamas, Egypt, Saudi Arabia, India, and southern China.  For every place north of the Tropic of Cancer, the sun is at its highest point in the sky and this is the longest day of the year.

    The winter solstice marks the shortest day and longest night of the year. In the Northern Hemisphere, it occurs when the sun is directly over the Tropic of Capricorn, which is located at 23.5° south of the equator and runs through Australia, Chile, southern Brazil, and northern South Africa.

    For a complete listing of the dates of the winter and summer solstices and spring and fall equinoxes through 2025, check out this site from the U.S. Naval Observatory. An alternative text link is found here.

    The Seasons

    We all know that the Earth makes a complete revolution around the sun once every 365 days, following an orbit that is elliptical in shape.  This means that the distance between the Earth and Sun, which is 93 million miles on average, varies throughout the year.  During the first week in January, the Earth is about 1.6 million miles closer to the sun. This is referred to as the perihelion.  The aphelion, or the point at which the Earth is about 1.6 million miles farther away from the sun, occurs during the first week in July.  This fact may sound counter to what we know about seasons in the Northern Hemisphere, but actually the difference is not significant in terms of climate and is NOT the reason why we have seasons.  Seasons are caused by the fact that the Earth is tilted on its axis by 23.5°.  The tilt's orientation with respect to space does not change during the year; thus, the Northern Hemisphere is tilted toward the sun in June and away from the sun in December, as illustrated in the graphic below.

    The Relationship Between Length of Day and Temperature

    There is a lag between the longest day of the year and the warmest average temperatures for most mid and high latitude locations.

    In northern OH/northwest PA, the maximum daily temperature occurs nearly 3 weeks later in mid July. Just as the warmest part of the day usually occurs several hours after noon, when the sun is highest in the sky, so too does the warmest part of the summer lags the summer solstice. This lag is due to the time required for ground and water to heat up. Average temperatures continue to climb until the sun drops lower in the sky. While the effect is evident in a daily temperature plot, it is more readily apparent by looking at changes in the monthly average temperature. In Cleveland, July averages 3.3°F degrees higher than June, with August also warmer than June by 2.8°F, even though the length of days in August is considerably less than the length of days in June.

    Source : www.weather.gov

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