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    The Odyssey: Central Ideas and Character Motivation, Part 2 (Quiz) Flashcards

    Start studying The Odyssey: Central Ideas and Character Motivation, Part 2 (Quiz). Learn vocabulary, terms, and more with flashcards, games, and other study tools.

    The Odyssey: Central Ideas and Character Motivation, Part 2 (Quiz)

    3.9 14 Reviews

    Read the excerpt from The Odyssey.

    Then,

    his chores being all dispatched, he caught another brace of men to make his breakfast, and whisked away his great door slab to let his sheep go through—but he, behind,reset the stone as one would cap a quiver.

    The use of the epic simile in this excerpt helps readers understand that:

    the Cyclops has eaten another bunch of Odysseus's men.

    Odysseus and his men are still trapped inside the cave.

    the enormous stone is easily and routinely moved by the giant Cyclops.

    the Cyclops takes his sheep out to pasture with him in the mornings.

    Click card to see definition 👆

    the enormous stone is easily and routinely moved by the giant Cyclops. (C)

    Click again to see term 👆

    Read the excerpt from The Odyssey.

    Then,

    his chores being all dispatched, he caught another brace of men to make his breakfast, and whisked away his great door slab to let his sheep go through—but he, behind,reset the stone as one would cap a quiver.

    What two things are being compared in this epic simile?

    the door slab to the Cyclops' sheep

    the stone to a quiver

    a brace of men to breakfast

    the Cyclops' chores to the men

    Click card to see definition 👆

    the stone to a quiver (B)

    Click again to see term 👆

    1/8 Created by Childishist

    Terms in this set (8)

    Read the excerpt from The Odyssey.

    Then,

    his chores being all dispatched, he caught another brace of men to make his breakfast, and whisked away his great door slab to let his sheep go through—but he, behind,reset the stone as one would cap a quiver.

    The use of the epic simile in this excerpt helps readers understand that:

    the Cyclops has eaten another bunch of Odysseus's men.

    Odysseus and his men are still trapped inside the cave.

    the enormous stone is easily and routinely moved by the giant Cyclops.

    the Cyclops takes his sheep out to pasture with him in the mornings.

    the enormous stone is easily and routinely moved by the giant Cyclops. (C)

    Read the excerpt from The Odyssey.

    Then,

    his chores being all dispatched, he caught another brace of men to make his breakfast, and whisked away his great door slab to let his sheep go through—but he, behind,reset the stone as one would cap a quiver.

    What two things are being compared in this epic simile?

    the door slab to the Cyclops' sheep

    the stone to a quiver

    a brace of men to breakfast

    the Cyclops' chores to the men

    the stone to a quiver (B)

    Read the excerpt from The Odyssey.

    In the next land we found were Cyclopes, giants, louts, without a law to bless them.In ignorance leaving the fruitage of the earth in mysteryto the immortal gods, they neither plownor sow by hand, nor till the ground, though grain— wild wheat and barley—grows untended, andwine-grapes, in clusters, ripen in heaven's rain.Cyclopes have no muster and no meeting,no consultation or old tribal ways,but each one dwells in his own mountain cave dealing out rough justice to wife and child,indifferent to what the others do.

    What inference can be made about the Cyclopes?

    They are hospitable and welcoming to visitors of their homes.

    They are uncivilized creatures who are potentially dangerous.

    They will band together against common enemies, if needed.

    They value education and sophistication above everything else.

    They are uncivilized creatures who are potentially dangerous. (B)

    Read the excerpt from The Odyssey.

    Why not

    take these cheeses, get them stowed, come back,throw open all the pens, and make a run for it?We'll drive the kids and lambs aboard. We sayput out again on good salt water!'

    Ah,

    how sound that was! Yet I refused. I wished to see the caveman, what he had to offer—no pretty sight, it turned out, for my friends.

    Odysseus ignores his men's pleas to return to the ship. As a result, they face terrible consequences. How does Odysseus's decision defy ancient Greek attitudes and values?

    A great leader makes decisions that are good for him, no matter how they affect his men.

    A great leader listens to his men and considers their thoughts and opinions.

    A great leader has great self-control and makes sound decisions.

    A great leader takes risks in order to gain more treasure and learn about foreign lands.

    A great leader has great self-control and makes sound decisions. (C)

    Read the excerpt from The Odyssey.

    'Aye

    He'll smash our timbers and our heads together!'

    I would not heed them in my glorying spirit, but let my anger flare and yelled:

    'Cyclops,

    if ever mortal man inquirehow you were put to shame and blinded, tell him Odysseus, raider of cities, took your eye: Laertes' son, whose home's on Ithaca!'

    What motivates Odysseus to reveal his name and put his men in more danger?

    anger and pride

    gratitude and relief

    weakness and fear joy and excitement Anger and pride (A)

    Read the excerpt from The Odyssey.

    'My ship?

    Poseidon Lord, who sets the earth a-tremble, broke it up on the rocks at your land's end. A wind from seaward served him, drove us there. We are survivors, these good men and I.'

    What motivates Odysseus to tell a lie to the Cyclops?

    Source : quizlet.com

    Kita, Stacey / Cyclops Questions

    Kita, Stacey

    1. What gift does Odysseus take with him when he goes to see the Cyclops? How dows this gift end up saving the lives of Odysseus and his men?

    Odysseus has brough a gift of liquor (wine/brandy) with him to the Cyclops' island. Odysseus uses the wine to get the Cyclops drunk. Odysseus blinds the Cyclops while he is drunk and is able to escape his cave.

    "this liquor...of brandy, pure and fiery....they would put one cupful--ruby-colored,

    honey-smooth--in twenty more of water,

    but still the sweet scent hovered like a fume

    over the winebowl" (127-133).

    2. What technique does the Cylcops use to control the passage of sheep in and out of his cave? Why does this technique prvent Odysseus and his men from safely killing the Cyclops?

    The Cyclops closes the mouth to his cave with a huge boulder, that only the giant monster can move. If Odysseus kills the Cylcops in the cave, he and his men will be trapped inside the cave and die anyway.

    "he swung high overhead a slab of solid rock to close the cave. Two dozen four-wheeled wagons, with heaving wagon teams, could not have stirred the tonnage of that rock from where he wedged it over the doorstill" (166-171).

    3. What god does Odysseus invoke as he asks the Cyclops for a gift? Why is this god appropriate?

    Odysseus invokes the name of Zeus when he asks the Cyclops for hospitality. This is appropriate because Zeus is the king of the gods, the most powerful god and respected and FEARED by all. The Greeks believed that Zeus would punish anyone who does not offer hospitality.

    "It was our luck to come here; here we stand,

    beholden for your help, or any gifts

    you give--as custom is to honor stragers.

    We would entreat you, great Sir, have a care

    for the gods' courtesy; Zeus will avenvge

    the unoffending guest" (Lines 194-197).

    4. Why does Odysseus lie and say that his ship was smashed when the Cyclops asks its location?

    Odysseus lies because he is afraid the Cyclops will destroy his ship, kill his men and eliminate their only means of escape from the island. Odysseus is being cunning.

    "Tell me, where was it, now, you left your ship--

    around the point, or down the shore, I wonder?

    He thought he'd find out, but I saw through this.

    and answered with a ready lie.

    My ship?

    Poseidon Lord, who sets the earth a-tremble,

    broke it upon the rocks at your land's end.

    A wind from seaward served him, drove us there.

    We are survivors, these good men and I"  (Lines 207-214)

    5. What does the Cyclops do to 2 of Odysseus' men? Why is this action particularly ironic given the Greek customs of the "laws of hospitality"?

    Cyclops captures and eats 2 of the men for dinner. This is ironic because in the Greek culture hospitality is greatly admired. The Cyclops should be giving Odysseus and his men dinner not making them his dinner.

    "He clutched at my companions

    and caught two in his hands like squirming puppies

    to beat their brains out, spattering the floor.

    Then he dismemberered them and made his meal,

    gaping and crunching like a mountain lion--

    everything innards, flesh and marrow bones" (Lines 216-221).

    6. Where do Odysseus and his men hide their wooden stake in the cave? How many men does it take to pick up this huge stake?

    They hide the stake in a pile of feces in the back of the cave. It takes a total of 5 men to pick up the stake.

    "I hewed again to make a stake with a pinted end. I held this

    in the fire's heart and turned it, toughening it,

    then hid it, well back in the cavern, under

    one of the dung piles in profusion there...

    the men I would have chosen won the toss--

    four strong men, and I made five as captain" (Lines 257-267).

    7. How many Kraters of wine does the Cyclops drink? Why is thiw wine particularly potent?

    The Cyclops drinks a total of 4 bowls of wine. The wine is very potent because it is nectar and ambrosia, the wine of the gods.

    "He seized and drained the bowl, and it went down

    so fiery and smooth he called for more...

    Even Cylcopses know the wine grapes grow

    out of grassland and loam in heaven's rain,

    but here's a bit of nectar and ambrosia"

    "Give me another, thank you kindly...

    Three bowls I brought him, and he poured them down.

    I saw the fuddle and flush come over him" (Lines 286-293).

    8. What does Odysseus tell the Cyclops his name (Odysseus) is? Why does this turn out to be clever and humorous? What does it turn out is the Cyclops' own name?

    Odysseus tells the Cyclops his name is "Nohbdy". When the Cyclops is injured he yells to the other Cyclopses on the island to come help him. When they arrive, the reader learns the Cyclops' name is Polyphemus. When the other one-eyed giants ask who has hurt Polyphemus he replies "No body" and they leave. Odysseus has cleverly figured out a way to confuse the giants.

    "My name is Nohbdy: mother, father and friends,

    everyone calls me Nohbdy... (Lines 297-298)

    "he set up a howl for Cyclopses who lived in caves on windy peaks nearby...

    What ails you Polyphemus? Why do you cry so sore in the starry night?...

    Kita, Stacey 1. What gift does Odysseus take with him when he goes to see the Cyclops? How dows this gift end up saving the lives of Odysseus and his men? Odysseus has brough a gift of liquor (wine/brandy) with him to the Cyclops' island. Odysseus uses the wine to get the Cyclops drunk. Odysseus blinds the Cyclops while he is drunk and is able to escape his cave. "this liquor...of brandy, pure and fiery....they would put one cupful--ruby-colored, honey-smooth--in twenty more of water, but still the sweet scent hovered like a fume over the winebowl" (127-133). 2. What technique does the Cylcops use to control the passage of sheep in and out of his cave? Why does this technique prvent Odysseus and his men from safely killing the Cyclops? The Cyclops closes the mouth to his cave with a huge boulder, that only the giant monster can move. If Odysseus kills the Cylcops in the cave, he and his men will be trapped inside the cave and die anyway. "he swung high overhead a slab of solid rock to close the cave. Two dozen four-wheeled wagons, with heaving wagon teams, could not have stirred the tonnage of that rock from where he wedged it over the doorstill" (166-171). 3. What god does Odysseus invoke as he asks the Cyclops for a gift? Why is this god appropriate? Odysseus invokes the name of Zeus when he asks the Cyclops for hospitality. This is appropriate because Zeus is the king of the gods, the most powerful god and respected and FEARED by all. The Greeks believed that Zeus would punish anyone who does not offer hospitality. "It was our luck to come here; here we stand, beholden for your help, or any gifts you give--as custom is to honor stragers. We would entreat you, great Sir, have a care for the gods' courtesy; Zeus will avenvge the unoffending guest" (Lines 194-197). 4. Why does Odysseus lie and say that his ship was smashed when the Cyclops asks its location? Odysseus lies because he is afraid the Cyclops will destroy his ship, kill his men and eliminate their only means of escape from the island. Odysseus is being cunning. "Tell me, where was it, now, you left your ship-- around the point, or down the shore, I wonder? He thought he'd find out, but I saw through this. and answered with a ready lie. My ship? Poseidon Lord, who sets the earth a-tremble, broke it upon the rocks at your land's end. A wind from seaward served him, drove us there. We are survivors, these good men and I"  (Lines 207-214) 5. What does the Cyclops do to 2 of Odysseus' men? Why is this action particularly ironic given the Greek customs of the "laws of hospitality"? Cyclops captures and eats 2 of the men for dinner. This is ironic because in the Greek culture hospitality is greatly admired. The Cyclops should be giving Odysseus and his men dinner not making them his dinner. "He clutched at my companions and caught two in his hands like squirming puppies to beat their brains out, spattering the floor. Then he dismemberered them and made his meal, gaping and crunching like a mountain lion-- everything innards, flesh and marrow bones" (Lines 216-221). 6. Where do Odysseus and his men hide their wooden stake in the cave? How many men does it take to pick up this huge stake? They hide the stake in a pile of feces in the back of the cave. It takes a total of 5 men to pick up the stake. "I hewed again to make a stake with a pinted end. I held this in the fire's heart and turned it, toughening it, then hid it, well back in the cavern, under one of the dung piles in profusion there... the men I would have chosen won the toss-- four strong men, and I made five as captain" (Lines 257-267). 7. How many Kraters of wine does the Cyclops drink? Why is thiw wine particularly potent? The Cyclops drinks a total of 4 bowls of wine. The wine is very potent because it is nectar and ambrosia, the wine of the gods. "He seized and drained the bowl, and it went down so fiery and smooth he called for more... Even Cylcopses know the wine grapes grow out of grassland and loam in heaven's rain, but here's a bit of nectar and ambrosia" "Give me another, thank you kindly... Three bowls I brought him, and he poured them down. I saw the fuddle and flush come over him" (Lines 286-293). 8. What does Odysseus tell the Cyclops his name (Odysseus) is? Why does this turn out to be clever and humorous? What does it turn out is the Cyclops' own name? Odysseus tells the Cyclops his name is "Nohbdy". When the Cyclops is injured he yells to the other Cyclopses on the island to come help him. When they arrive, the reader learns the Cyclops' name is Polyphemus. When the other one-eyed giants ask who has hurt Polyphemus he replies "No body" and they leave. Odysseus has cleverly figured out a way to confuse the giants. "My name is Nohbdy: mother, father and friends, everyone calls me Nohbdy... (Lines 297-298)   "he set up a howl for Cyclopses who lived in caves on windy peaks nearby... What ails you Polyphemus? Why do you cry so sore in the starry night?... Sure no man's driving off your flock? No man has tricked you, ruined you?

    Source : www.manvilleschools.org

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    James 15 day ago
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    Guys, does anyone know the answer?

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