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    what is your stopping distance when you are driving 20 mph on dry pavement?

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    What is the stopping distance at 20mph?

    The stopping distance at 20mph is around 3 car lengths . ... Stopping distances at different speeds. Speed Thinking + braking distance Stopping distance

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    What Is The Stopping Distance At 20mph?

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    The stopping distance at 20mph is around 3 car lengths .

    Stopping distances at different speeds.

    Speed Thinking + braking distance Stopping distance

    20mph 6m + 6m 12m ( 40 feet )

    30mph 9m + 14m 23m (75 feet)

    • Aug 11, 2017

    How does thinking distance increase with speed? The thinking distance depends on the reaction time of the driver which could be affected by drugs, alcohol, distractions and tiredness. This distance will also be affected by the car’s speed. … A faster speed increases both thinking and braking distance, increasing the total stopping distance.

    Likewise How fast can cars stop?

    Driver Care – Know Your Stopping Distance

    Speed Perception/Reaction Distance Equal to Approx Number of Car Lengths (@15 feet)

    30 mph 44 feet 6 40 mph 59 feet 9 50 mph 73 feet 14

    60 mph 88 feet 18

    Do you need to know stopping distances for theory test 2021? Stopping distances are a favourite part of the theory test, but they’re not easy to remember. … There are 3.3 feet in a metre – so divide the distance in feet by 3.3 to get the stopping distance in metres. You’ll need a calculator for that, but it shouldn’t be necessary for the theory test.

    What is normal braking distance?

    Virtually all current production vehicles’ published road braking performance tests indicate stopping distances from 60 mph that are typically 120 to 140 feet, slightly less than half of the projected safety distances.

    Does thinking distance increase? The thinking distance increases if the reaction time increases. This can happen if the driver is: tired. distracted.

    What are 5 factors that affect stopping distance?

    10 things that can affect your stopping distance

    Speed. Your stopping distance is actually made up of two factors – thinking distance and braking distance. …

    Brakes. … Tyre Pressure. … Tyre Wear. … Tyre Quality. … Road Conditions. … View of the Road. … Distractions.

    What is safe braking distance? In normal and dry conditions a driver should keep 2 to 3 seconds distance from the vehicle in front. … In wet or slippery conditions a driver should keep 4 to 5 seconds distance from the vehicle in front.

    What car has the strongest brakes?

    2018 Porsche 911 Turbo S (tie) — 133 ft. …

    2018 Mercedes-AMG GT R (tie) — 133 ft. …

    2018 Porsche 911 GT2 RS Weissach (tie) — 129 ft. …

    2017 Chevrolet Corvette Grand Sport (Z07) (tie) — 129 ft. …

    2019 Porsche 911 GT3 RS (tie) — 128 ft. …

    2015 Chevrolet Corvette Z06 (Z07) (tie) — 128 ft. …

    2019 Chevrolet Corvette ZR1 — 127 ft.

    Which car brand has the best brakes? Best Braking

    Make & Model Stopping Distance, Feet

    Chevrolet Corvette 2LT 113

    Maserati Ghibli S Q4 115

    Toyota Supra Premium 115

    Dodge Challenger R/T Plus 119

    • Dec 12, 2021

    How fast can a Tesla brake?

    Over the weekend, Tesla pushed out an over-the-air software update, one that the carmaker says tweaked the calibration of the vehicle’s antilock braking algorithm. That cut the vehicle’s 60 mph stopping distance a whole 19 feet, to 133, about average for a luxury compact sedan.

    How far are you allowed to reverse? Posts navigation. You mustn’t reverse further than is necessary. You may decide to turn your vehicle around by reversing into an opening or side road. When you reverse, always look all around you, and watch for pedestrians.

    How do you remember thinking and braking distances?

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    The factors are easy to remember – just start at 2 for 20mph and add 0.5 for each 10 mph increase in speed. Example: Question: What is the overall stopping distance at 50mph? Answer: Factor for 50mph is 3.5 and so overall stopping distance at 50mph is 50 x 3.5 = 175 feet.

    How many questions are in the theory test? Practice to pass your official driving theory test faster

    How long is the multiple choice theory test: 57 minutes ( 50 questions )

    How long is the hazard perception test: 14 minutes (1 minute per clip)

    How many questions are there on the theory test: 50 questions (43 correct to pass)

    Why should you drive slower at night?

    Drive slower

    One of the main reasons why you should drive slower at night is because of slower reaction times. With limited visibility, reacting to hazards, traffic signs, and other vehicles takes longer. By driving slower, you’ll have more time to make the appropriate actions when necessary.

    When should you slow down when driving? Did You Know? You should reduce your speed by 1/3 on wet roads and by 1/2 or more on snow packed roads (i.e., if you would normally be traveling at a speed of 60 mph on dry pavement, then on a wet road you should reduce your speed to 40 mph, and on a snow-packed road you should reduce your speed to 30 mph).

    What is the stopping distance at 70mph?

    Stopping Distance: Is The Highway Code Wrong?

    Speed Stopping Distance

    Source : dictionary.tn

    Know your stopping distances

    An explanation of stopping distances, thinking distances, braking distances and the factors that influence them.

    STOPPING DISTANCES

    Closer than you think: Know your stopping distances

    We're all sometimes guilty of driving too fast for the conditions and too close to other cars. (Although we hate it when it happens to us. Tailgating is the top peeve of drivers, according to our Member surveys.)

    But to be a safe driver, it's important to understand stopping distances. Whether you're studying for your theory test or you passed years ago, it's worth revising.

    Leaving enough distance between you and the car in front will:

    Give you a better view of the road ahead.

    Let you react and stop in time if cars ahead suddenly brake.

    Help with fuel economy - you'll drive more smoothly and won't be braking every time the car in front slows down.

    Read on to learn how much stopping distance you should leave.

    We provide 24/7 roadside assistance.

    Buy breakdown cover

    What is stopping distance?

    Stopping distance is the time that it takes to bring a moving car to a complete stop. This includes

    The time it takes you to react to the hazard (thinking distance), and

    The time it takes for the brakes to stop the car (braking distance)

    You can calculate it with this stopping distance formula:

    Stopping distance = thinking distance + braking distance

    How much stopping distance should I leave?

    When driving, you should leave enough clear distance in front of you to be able to come to a stop. This is in case the traffic suddenly slows down, causing you to brake.

    However, stopping distances vary depending on factors like the weather and your driving speed.

    The stopping distance will increase the faster you drive and the wetter the road is. It also takes time to process what's happening before you start braking.

    The Highway Code shows this by splitting the typical stopping distance up into thinking distance and braking distance. You'll need to remember the distances for your theory test.

    The distances are based on the average car length in the UK and assume the road is dry.

    Stopping distances at different speeds

    Speed Thinking + braking distance Stopping distance

    20mph 6m + 6m 12m (40 feet)

    30mph 9m + 14m 23m (75 feet)

    40mph 12m + 24m 36m (118 feet)

    50mph 15m + 38m 53m (174 feet)

    60mph 18m + 55m 73m (240 feet)

    70mph 21m + 75m 96m (315 feet)

    The stopping distance at 20mph is around 3 car lengths. At 50mph it's around 13 car lengths. If you're travelling at 70mph, the stopping distance will be more like 24 car lengths.

    What is thinking distance?

    This is the distance your car travels between you spotting a hazard and starting to brake.

    If the car in front slams on their brakes, then no matter how hard you try, you won't be able to brake immediately. It'll take you time (and distance) to react to what's happening, decide to brake, and then hit the pedal.

    The Highway Code bases its thinking distances on a thinking time of just under 0.7 seconds. The faster you're going, the further you'll travel in that time.

    The thinking distance at 50mph is 15m, nearly the length of 2 London buses. At 70mph, the thinking distance will be about 21m.

    What can affect thinking distance?

    Besides your speed, other factors can affect your reaction time too:

    1. Drugs and alcohol

    Drinking and taking drugs both slow down your reaction time.

    Slower reactions increase the distance covered before you react to danger ahead.

    2. Distractions

    If you're not completely focused on the road ahead then it'll take you longer to react.

    Sat-navs, mobile phones and other in-car tech can distract drivers.

    It's illegal to hold a mobile to call or text while driving. But even a hands-free call can take your mind off the road.

    Talking to passengers and fiddling with the radio or heating can also divide your attention.

    3. Tiredness

    Lack of sleep severely affects driver attention, awareness and reaction time.

    On longer journeys, you should take a break every couple of hours.

    Research has shown that after driving for 2 hours you'll be less able to concentrate and slower to react.

    All these factors affect how quickly you react and hit the brakes when you spot a hazard. Once you brake, your stopping distance will depend your car's upkeep as well as the road and weather conditions.

    What is braking distance?

    This is the distance your car will travel once you hit the brakes before it comes to a complete stop.

    For the same car under the same conditions, the braking distance will increase as your speed goes up. That's why the Highway Code gives typical braking distances for a range of speeds.

    Source : www.theaa.com

    Stopping distances

    What is stopping distance? Many people think that stopping distance is the same as braking distance - WRONG! STOPPING DISTANCE = THINKING DISTANCE + BRAKING DISTANCE What is thinking distance? Thinking distance is the distance the car travels after the person driving has seen the danger but before they’ve applied the brakes. Thinking distance is […]

    DRIVING TIPS AND OTHER LIFE STUFF

    Stopping distances

    What is stopping distance?

    Many people think that stopping distance is the same as braking distance - WRONG!

    STOPPING DISTANCE = THINKING DISTANCE + BRAKING DISTANCE

    What is thinking distance?

    Thinking distance is the distance the car travels after the person driving has seen the danger but before they’ve applied the brakes.

    Thinking distance is roughly 1 foot for every 1 mph you are travelling. In other words, if you are travelling at 30mph then your thinking distance is approximately 30 feet.

    What is braking distance?

    Braking distance is the distance the car travels coming to a stop, once the brakes have been applied. This increases with speed.

    Average stopping distance

    This image from the Highway Code gives you an idea of average stopping distances according to speed

    The average car driving at 20 mph will travel 20 feet before coming to a complete stop, however a car travelling at 40 mph will take 80 ft to come to a stop – that’s why it’s SO important not to exceed the speed limit.

    Stopping distance: The average stopping distances should be multiplied by 2 for stopping distances in the rain and multiplied by 10 for stopping distances on ice.

    All very well in theory but what about real life?

    Average stopping distances are really only a rough guide. In real life, there are loads of things that can affect the distance it takes you to stop:

    Speed: How fast are you travelling?Gradient: Whether you are on a smooth level road, or a hill. If you are going up or down, how steep is it?Weather: is it good, dry, wet or icy?Tyres: are they good tyres, are they properly inflated, worn or a bit flat?Brakes: are your brakes working well and are they stopping you in a straight line?You: your ability as a driver! Are you ill, tired, on medication, have you been drinking alcohol or taking drugs, are you distracted, have you had an eye test recently? All of these will have an effect on your thinking distance.

    What are separation distances?

    Separation distances are really important - they are the minimum distances you should leave between you and the car in front to make sure you can come to a stop safely if there is a hazard or potential hazard.

    The 2 second rule: Choose a fixed point such as a lamp post or bridge and when the car in front passes it start counting 2 seconds. As you finish speaking you should be reaching that same point.

    Updated: 4th March 2019

    Get more driving tips in the Young Driver's Guide.

    Source : blog.ingenie.com

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