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    what is the purpose of this passage? to explain the new technologies farmers used in the 1800s to connect a period of russian history with the history of sugar to explain to readers how enslaved africans differed from russian serfs to give background information about the origins of cane sugar

    James

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    get what is the purpose of this passage? to explain the new technologies farmers used in the 1800s to connect a period of russian history with the history of sugar to explain to readers how enslaved africans differed from russian serfs to give background information about the origins of cane sugar from EN Bilgi.

    Read the passage from sugar Changed the World what is the purpose of this passage

    How does the illustration relate to the description of a Great House in the text? The illustration shows what a Great House looked like from the ...

    Read the passage from sugar Changed the World what is the purpose of this passage

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    How does the illustration relate to the description of a Great House in the text? The illustration shows what a Great House looked like from the outside, while the text explains what a Great House looked like from the inside. On a plantation there were large groups of workers—between fifty and several hundred.

    Which text evidence best supports the author’s claim that sugar processing was a long and difficult process?

    How does the evidence support the central idea that cane sugar helped lead to abolition of slavery?

    How does the evidence support the central idea that cane sugar helped lead to the abolition of slavery the evidence explains that modern technology triggered the shift from cane sugar to beet sugar?

    Which text evidence supports the authors claim?

    How does the image support the text sugar changed the world?

    Which claim do both passages support sugar changed the world?

    How does the image support the text quizlet?

    How does the image most support the central idea of this text?

    How do the details in this passage support the author’s purpose quizlet?

    How does the illustration relate to the description of a great house in the text quizlet?

    Which goal does this passage best address?

    What central idea does the heading help you understand?

    How does the map help the reader understand the passage quizlet?

    Why is it smart to remain cool when making a claim?

    How is a fact different from an opinion?

    Which statement best describes the author’s purpose in this passage sugar changed the world?

    How does the image most support the central idea of this text sugar changed the world?

    What evidence from the passage best supports the inference that white sugar was rare in more valuable than brown sugar?

    What claim do the authors make in this passage sugar changed the world?

    What is the purpose of this passage in one part of Russia?

    What evidence do the authors include to support the central idea of this passage sugar changed the world?

    Which evidence best supports the author’s claim and purpose Simple enough?

    Which text evidence best supports the author’s claim?

    Which text evidence best supports the authors claim?

    What is the author’s purpose in this passage to inform the reader about the daily routines?

    How do the authors use historical evidence to support their claim?

    How do authors support their claim and purpose with their choice of words?

    How do authors support their claim?

    How does the author use of the word silence affect the tone?

    How can silence be used for inner development?

    What is the importance of silence?

    What is the power of silence?

    Why is silence important in prayer?

    What is the central idea of the passage sugar changed the world?

    What evidence from the passage best supports the inference that white sugar was rarer?

    How do the authors create a tone that develops their claim and purpose?

    Which is the authors purpose for writing this passage sugar changed the world?

    How does the image best support the text sugar changed the world?

    What is the purpose of this passage sugar changed the world in one part of Russia?

    What is the author’s purpose in writing Passage 2?

    What is the author’s purpose in using confetti as a symbol?

    What is the message of Daedalus and Icarus?

    Which text evidence best supports the author’s claim that sugar processing was a long and difficult process?

    Answer:The correct answer is “Guests at sugar plantations often remarked on how many one- armed people they saw.” Explanation: The given text is taken from the passage Sugar Changed the World. This text evidence best supports the authors’ claim that a frantic pace made working conditions even worse.

    How does the evidence support the central idea that cane sugar helped lead to abolition of slavery?

    The evidence supports the central idea that can sugar helped lead to the abolition of slavery by revealing that sugar barons in Cuba and Russia freed enslaved people and serfs. Explanation: … Cane sugar had brought millions of Africans into slavery, then helped foster the movement to abolish the slave trade.

    Explanation: According to the excerpt from Sugar Changed the World, the evidence that supports the author’s claim and purpose is that sugar was popular and Wass used widely is the statement about Simple enough; but this trade up and down the Atlantic coast was part of a much larger world system.”

    How does the evidence support the central idea that cane sugar helped lead to the abolition of slavery the evidence explains that modern technology triggered the shift from cane sugar to beet sugar?

    The evidence explains that modern technology triggered the shift from cane sugar to beet sugar. The evidence reveals that sugar barons in Cuba and Russia freed enslaved people and serfs. The evidence reveals that the author’s family members were hardworking serfs on Russian farms.

    Thus, the text evidence that best supports the authors’ claim and purpose is how “the enslaved Africans’ ability to speak” presents them as human and changed the “Age of Sugar” to an “Age of Freedom”.

    Which text evidence supports the authors claim?

    Source : frojeostern.com

    AP United States History: The Origins of American Slavery

    Antecedents and Models Slavery is often termed "the peculiar institution," but it was hardly peculiar to the United States. Almost every society in the history of the world has experienced slavery at one time or another. The aborigines of Australia are about the only group that has so far not revealed a past mired in slavery—and perhaps the omission has more to do with the paucity of the evidence than anything else. To explore American slavery in its full international context, then, is essentially to tell the history of the globe.

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    Antecedents and Models

    Slavery is often termed "the peculiar institution," but it was hardly peculiar to the United States. Almost every society in the history of the world has experienced slavery at one time or another. The aborigines of Australia are about the only group that has so far not revealed a past mired in slavery—and perhaps the omission has more to do with the paucity of the evidence than anything else. To explore American slavery in its full international context, then, is essentially to tell the history of the globe. That task is not possible in the available space, so this essay will explore some key antecedents of slavery in North America and attempt to show what is distinctive or unusual about its development. The aim is to strike a balance between identifying continuities in the institution of slavery over time while also locating significant changes. The trick is to suggest preconditions, anticipations, and connections without implying that they were necessarily determinations (1).

    Significant precursors to American slavery can be found in antiquity, which produced two of only a handful of genuine slave societies in the history of the world. A slave society is one in which slaves played an important role and formed a significant proportion (say, over 20 percent) of the population. Classical Greece and Rome (or at least parts of those entities and for distinct periods of time) fit this definition and can be considered models for slavery's expansion in the New World. In Rome in particular, bondage went hand in hand with imperial expansion, as large influxes of slaves from outlying areas were funneled into large-scale agriculture, into the latifundia, the plantations of southern Italy and Sicily. American slaveholders could point to a classical tradition of reconciling slavery with reason and universal law; ancient Rome provided important legal formulas and justifications for modern slavery. Parallels between ancient and New World slavery abound: from the dehumanizing device of addressing male slaves of any age as "boy," the use of branding and head shaving as modes of humiliation, the comic inventiveness in naming slaves (a practice American masters continued simply by using classical names), the notion that slaves could possess a peculium (a partial and temporary capacity to enjoy a range of goods), the common pattern of making fugitive slaves wear a metal collar, to clothing domestic slaves in special liveries or uniforms. The Life of Aesop, a fictional slave biography from Roman Egypt in the first century CE, is revelatory of the anxieties and fears that pervade any slave society, and some of the sexual tensions so well displayed are redolent of later American slavery. Yet, of course, ancient slavery was fundamentally different from modern slavery in being an equal opportunity condition —all ethnicities could be slaves—and in seeing slaves as primarily a social, not an economic, category. Ancient cultural mores were also distinctive: Greeks enslaved abandoned infants; Romans routinely tortured slaves to secure testimony; and even though the Stoics were prepared to acknowledge the humanity of the slave, neither they nor anyone else in the ancient world ever seriously questioned the place of slavery in society. Aristotle, after all, thought that some people were "slaves by nature," that there were in effect natural slaves (2).

    Africa and the Slave Trade

    Arabs and their Muslim allies were the first to make use of large numbers of sub-Saharan black Africans. They developed a long-distance slave trade, which began in the seventh century and lasted into the twentieth. It delivered many millions of Africans across the Sahara Desert, Red Sea, and Indian Ocean to North Africa, the Mediterranean, and Persian Gulf. Although over a much longer period of time and comprising far more females, the number of Africans exported via these trans-Saharan or Indian Ocean slave trades probably equaled, or even outmatched, those of its transatlantic counterpart. The preexistence of these export trades facilitated Atlantic trade: systems of slave marketing were already in place. So numerous were black Africans at certain times and in certain places that they were able to launch massive slave revolts—in 869, for instance, in what is now southern Iraq, where the so-called Zanj (who came from the Swahili Coast and lands further north) worked in large gangs draining marshlands. While the Quran and Islamic law were essentially color-blind and while Muslims enslaved many so-called "white" people, medieval Arabs came to associate the most degrading forms of labor with black slaves. The Arabic word for slave, `abd, came to mean a black slave. Many Arab writers had racial contempt for black people, and the racial stereotypes of the medieval Middle East were probably transmitted to the Iberian Peninsula (3).

    As the long-standing trans-Saharan slave trade reveals, slavery existed in sub-Saharan Africa long before the Atlantic slave trade. In some —perhaps most—places, slavery tended to be a minor institution, with the slave able to pass in time from alien to kin member; in others, most notably a number of Islamicized regimes, slavery was more central, with violence, economic exploitation, and lack of kinship rights more evident. In large part because Africa was underpopulated, a broad spectrum of dependent statuses, with slavery as just one variant, existed; and slaves played a wide range of roles from field workers to soldiers, from domestics to administrators. The ethnic fragmentation of sub-Saharan Africa meant that there were few states strong enough to prevent opportunistic African kings or merchants profiting from slave raiding. Those kingdoms that opposed exporting slaves did not have the means to stop the traffic. Lacking an overall religious or political unity, Africans could enslave other Africans because the concept of "African-ness" had no meaning. Accustomed to tropical climates, inured to agricultural labor, and reared in a harsh epidemiological environment, sub-Saharan Africans made productive slaves (4).

    Source : apcentral.collegeboard.org

    "Sugar Changed the World" Unit Test Review

    Read the passage from Sugar Changed the World.The only way to make a lot of sugar is to engineer a system in which an army of workers swarms through the fields, cuts the cane, and hauls the pile to be crushed into a syrup that flows into the boiling room. There, laboring around the clock, workers cook and clean the bubbling liquid so that the sweetest syrup turns into the sweetest sugar. This is not farming the way men and women had done it for thousands of years in the Age of Honey. It is much more like a factory, where masses of people must do every step right, on time, together, or the whole system collapses.What claim do the authors make in this passage?Sugar farming is a modern version of honey farming.Sugar cane has to be boiled in order to make sugar.Sugar production requires a great deal of workers.This method of making sugar is thousands of years old., Read the passage from Sugar Changed the World.No one could have seen it at the time, but the invention of beet sugar was not just a challenge to cane. It was a hint—just a glimpse, like a twist that comes about two thirds of the way through a movie—that the end of the Age of Sugar was in sight. For beet sugar showed that in order to create that perfect sweetness you did not need slaves, you did not need plantations, in fact you did not even need cane. Beet sugar was a foreshadowing of what we have today: the Age of Science, in which sweetness is a product of chemistry, not whips.In 1854 only 11 percent of world sugar production came from beets. By 1899 the percentage had risen to about 65 percent. And beet sugar was just the first challenge to cane. By 1879 chemists discovered saccharine—a laboratory-created substance that is several hundred times sweeter than natural sugar. Today the sweeteners used in the foods you eat may come from corn (high-fructose corn syrup), from fruit (fructose), or directly from the lab (for example, aspartame, invented in 1965, or sucralose—Splenda—created in 1976). Brazil is the land that imported more Africans than any other to work on sugar plantations, and in Brazil the soil is still perfect for sugar. Cane grows in Brazil today, but not always for sugar. Instead, cane is often used to create ethanol, much as corn farmers in America now convert their harvest into fuel.Which sentence best states the authors' claim in this passage?Today we have many sources of sugar, but sugarcane is still the best source.Advances in the production of sweeteners hastened the end of involuntary servitude.The Age of Science has made the role of modern chemists similar to the former role of slaves.Brazilians make ethanol from sugarcane because they cannot grow corn successfully., Read the passage from Sugar Changed the World.From the 1750s on, sugar transformed how Europeans ate. Chefs who served the wealthy began to divide meals up. Where sugar had previously been used either as a decoration (as in the wedding feast) or as a spice to flavor all courses, now it was removed from recipes for meat, fish, and vegetables and given its own place—in desserts. Dessert as the extremely sweet end to the meal was invented because so much sugar was available. But the wealthy were not the only ones whose meals were changing. Sugar became a food, a necessity, and the foundation of the diet for England's poorest workers., Read the passage from Sugar Changed the World.The Muslims worked out a new form of farming to handle sugar, which came to be called the sugar plantation. A plantation was not a new technology but, rather, a new way of organizing planting, growing, cutting, and refining a crop. On a regular farm there may be cows, pigs, and chickens; fields of grain; orchards filled with fruit—many different kinds of foods to eat or sell. By contrast, the plantation had only one purpose: to create a single product that could be grown, ground, boiled, dried, and sold to distant markets. Since one cannot live on sugar, the crop grown on plantations could not even feed the people who harvested it. Never before in human history had farms been run this way, as machines designed to satisfy just one craving of buyers who could be thousands of miles away.On a plantation there were large groups of workers—between fifty and several hundred. The mill was right next to the crop, so that growing and grinding took place in the same spot.Which text evidence best supports the authors' claim?"A plantation was not a new technology but, rather, a new way of organizing planting, growing, cutting, and refining a crop.""By contrast, the plantation had only one purpose: to create a single product that could be grown, ground, boiled, dried, and sold to distant markets.""Since one cannot live on sugar, the crop grown on plantations could not even feed the people who harvested it.""The mill was right next to the crop, so that growing and grinding took place in the same spot."

    Show:

    Supporting an author's claim

    Author's purpose

    Supporting the central idea

    Making inferences 100

    Read the passage from Sugar Changed the World.

    The only way to make a lot of sugar is to engineer a system in which an army of workers swarms through the fields, cuts the cane, and hauls the pile to be crushed into a syrup that flows into the boiling room. There, laboring around the clock, workers cook and clean the bubbling liquid so that the sweetest syrup turns into the sweetest sugar. This is not farming the way men and women had done it for thousands of years in the Age of Honey. It is much more like a factory, where masses of people must do every step right, on time, together, or the whole system collapses.

    What claim do the authors make in this passage?

    Sugar farming is a modern version of honey farming.

    Sugar cane has to be boiled in order to make sugar.

    Sugar production requires a great deal of workers.

    This method of making sugar is thousands of years old.

    What claim do the authors make in this passage?

    Sugar farming is a modern version of honey farming.

    Sugar cane has to be boiled in order to make sugar.

    Sugar production requires a great deal of workers.

    This method of making sugar is thousands of years old.

    100

    Which question should a reader ask to identify an author's purpose?

    Why did the author write this text?

    What evidence does the author provide?

    What is the author's opinion on this topic?

    How effective is the evidence?

    Which question should a reader ask to identify an author's purpose?

    Why did the author write this text?

    What evidence does the author provide?

    What is the author's opinion on this topic?

    How effective is the evidence?

    100

    Which type of evidence would most likely include a testimonial?

    empirical logical ethical anecdotal

    Which type of evidence would most likely include a testimonial?

    empirical logical ethical

    anecdotal

    100

    Read the passage from Sugar Changed the World.

    One of these early Hindu writings, the Atharva Veda, speaks of an archer's bow made of sugar cane. It tells of growing a circle of sugar cane as a kind of sweet protection for a lover, and it includes specific instructions on how to use sugar cane.

    Which inference does this passage support?

    Hindus who lived in ancient times used sugar the same way we use it today.

    Hindus who lived in ancient times believed that sugar had powerful properties.

    Most Hindus in ancient times had very few specific uses for sugar cane.

    Most Hindus in ancient times searched for new ways to use sugar cane.

    Which inference does this passage support?

    Hindus who lived in ancient times used sugar the same way we use it today.

    Hindus who lived in ancient times believed that sugar had powerful properties.

    Most Hindus in ancient times had very few specific uses for sugar cane.

    Most Hindus in ancient times searched for new ways to use sugar cane.

    200

    Read the passage from Sugar Changed the World.

    No one could have seen it at the time, but the invention of beet sugar was not just a challenge to cane. It was a hint—just a glimpse, like a twist that comes about two thirds of the way through a movie—that the end of the Age of Sugar was in sight. For beet sugar showed that in order to create that perfect sweetness you did not need slaves, you did not need plantations, in fact you did not even need cane. Beet sugar was a foreshadowing of what we have today: the Age of Science, in which sweetness is a product of chemistry, not whips.

    In 1854 only 11 percent of world sugar production came from beets. By 1899 the percentage had risen to about 65 percent. And beet sugar was just the first challenge to cane. By 1879 chemists discovered saccharine—a laboratory-created substance that is several hundred times sweeter than natural sugar. Today the sweeteners used in the foods you eat may come from corn (high-fructose corn syrup), from fruit (fructose), or directly from the lab (for example, aspartame, invented in 1965, or sucralose—Splenda—created in 1976). Brazil is the land that imported more Africans than any other to work on sugar plantations, and in Brazil the soil is still perfect for sugar. Cane grows in Brazil today, but not always for sugar. Instead, cane is often used to create ethanol, much as corn farmers in America now convert their harvest into fuel.

    Which sentence best states the authors' claim in this passage?

    Today we have many sources of sugar, but sugarcane is still the best source.

    Advances in the production of sweeteners hastened the end of involuntary servitude.

    The Age of Science has made the role of modern chemists similar to the former role of slaves.

    Brazilians make ethanol from sugarcane because they cannot grow corn successfully.

    Which sentence best states the authors' claim in this passage?

    Today we have many sources of sugar, but sugarcane is still the best source.

    Advances in the production of sweeteners hastened the end of involuntary servitude.

    The Age of Science has made the role of modern chemists similar to the former role of slaves.

    Brazilians make ethanol from sugarcane because they cannot grow corn successfully.

    Source : jeopardylabs.com

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    James 14 day ago
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