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    what is the purpose of presenting a false dilemma in a speech? to convince the audience that there are limited options to convince the audience that an argument is flawed to provide the audience with several alternative examples to sway the audience to rush to an opinion without facts

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    False Dilemma Fallacy Examples

    If someone presents only two choices to you, they may be using a false dilemma. Check out these examples of false dilemmas in everyday life and learn how to avoid falling for this logical fallacy.

    False Dilemma Fallacy Examples

    A false dilemma presents a choice between two mutually exclusive options, implying that there are no other options. One option is clearly worse than the other, making the choice seem obvious. Also known as the either/or fallacy, false dilemmas are a type of informal logical fallacy in which a faulty argument is used to persuade an audience to agree. False dilemmas are everywhere. They can be deliberate or accidental, but their goal is to make their argument convincing.

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    False Dilemma Examples in Politics

    Politics use many logical fallacies to persuade the public. These fallacies often veer into political propaganda, which uses emotional appeals as arguments. Here are some examples of false dilemmas that limit a citizen’s choices.

    Vote for me or live through four more years of higher taxes.

    America: Love it or leave it.

    Donate to my campaign if you care about the future.

    If you want our country to be safe, we must increase military spending.

    Either we let every immigrant into our country, or we close the borders for everyone.

    False Dilemmas in Product Advertising

    Most advertisements use multiple logical fallacies for one reason: they work. If people are afraid of being unpopular or unattractive, they are more likely to fall for fallacious arguments. Read these examples of ways that companies use false dilemmas to sell something. Many of these messages are implied, if not stated outright.

    If you don’t use our beauty products, you’ll never look youthful.

    You can look cool in our clothes, or you can look like a loser.

    Do you want to drink our beer or our competitor’s unhealthy, watered-down beer?

    Subscribe to our streaming service or be stuck with cable.

    You can either eat at this restaurant or have a sad TV dinner alone.

    Would You Rather?

    The “would you rather” argument is a common form of false dilemma. It presents two options, one of which is unsavory, and prompts the listener to make a decision. Here are some examples of “would you rather” statements.

    Would you rather pursue your passion or be stuck in a 9-to-5 job?

    Would you rather keep your job or be honest with your boss?

    Would you rather invest in your future or enjoy your money now?

    These questions are emotionally loaded, making them inherently flawed. However, “would you rather” games can be fun when players must choose between two equally pleasant or unpleasant experiences. For example, “Would you rather sleep on a porcupine pillow or wear shoes made of slime?”

    Helpful False Dilemmas

    Sometimes it’s necessary to narrow choices down to two – if the choice is genuine. Presenting listeners with a limited number of choices can be an effective way to move a decision along. Some helpful uses of false dilemmas include:

    Negotiating with children: We can go home or you can behave in the grocery store.

    Customer service: For the side, you can choose either soup or salad.

    Situations with an overwhelming number of options: Let’s watch either Avatar or Star Wars tonight.

    While these examples are technically false dilemmas, because they ignore many other options, they are ultimately beneficial for both speaker and listener. Often, having too many options leads to analysis paralysis, which can hamper decision-making just as much as a logical fallacy.

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    How to Respond to a False Dilemma

    When presented with a false dilemma, consider whether those two options are really your only choices. Determine whether refusing one option will inevitably lead to the second option. If you are presenting yourself with a false dilemma, such as “I must lose 10 pounds or no one will like me,” practice positive self-talk to think through alternative options.

    Next, as in any argument, consider the speaker’s purpose and point of view. Are they trying to convince you to do something by offering a false choice? Is making this decision in your best interest, or in theirs? If it is indeed a false choice, call them out on it by naming a third option.

    Differentiating From Related Terms

    What’s the difference between a false dilemma, a false dichotomy, and a false analogy?

    False Dichotomy

    A false dichotomy indicates that two options are opposites. It is a type of false dilemma, which uses these limited options to persuade a listener to make a faulty choice. The terms “false dilemma” and “false dichotomy” are often used interchangeably.

    Example: You can either get married or be alone for the rest of your life.

    False dichotomies are related to false dilemmas because they both prompt listeners to choose between two unrelated options.

    False Analogy

    Another related type of logical fallacy is a false analogy. False analogies inaccurately compare two items as completely related when they might be only slightly similar. They are a form of inductive reasoning that discounts nuance in their conclusions.

    Example: Children who don’t get enough sleep don’t do well in school. Therefore, extra sleep improves school performance.

    False analogies are different from false dilemmas, because they are using faulty comparisons to lead an audience to a conclusion.

    Source : examples.yourdictionary.com

    (4) Analyzing Rhetorical Strategies in Presidential Speeches Flashcards

    Start studying (4) Analyzing Rhetorical Strategies in Presidential Speeches. Learn vocabulary, terms, and more with flashcards, games, and other study tools.

    (4) Analyzing Rhetorical Strategies in Presidential Speeches

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    Which type of appeal does Reagan use in this part of the speech?

    Click card to see definition 👆

    O emotional

    Click again to see term 👆

    Read the first three paragraphs of Franklin Roosevelt's request for a declaration of war.

    Beyond Congress, who is his primary intended audience?

    Click card to see definition 👆

    O the American public

    Click again to see term 👆

    1/17 Created by ginathoang

    Terms in this set (17)

    Which type of appeal does Reagan use in this part of the speech?

    O emotional

    Read the first three paragraphs of Franklin Roosevelt's request for a declaration of war.

    Beyond Congress, who is his primary intended audience?

    O the American public

    What is the purpose of presenting a false dilemma in a speech?

    O to convince the audience that there are limited options

    Which sentence from Roosevelt's request for a declaration of war is an example of a bandwagon appeal?

    O "The people of the United States have already formed their opinions and well understand the implications to the very life and safety of our Nation."

    Which best describes the type of appeal used in this part of the speech?

    Read the excerpt from Franklin Roosevelt's request for a declaration of war.

    It will be recorded that the distance of Hawaii from Japan makes it obvious that the attack was deliberately planned many days or even weeks ago. During the intervening time the Japanese Government has deliberately sought to deceive the United States by false statements and expressions of hope for continued peace.

    O a logical appeal

    What happens in an ad hominem persuasive technique?

    O A person is attacked rather than an argument.

    Which statement from a city mayor's speech is an example of hyperbole?

    O Voting in the municipal election is a matter of life and death.

    How does repetition create meaning in this excerpt?

    O The repetition emphasizes the principles of freedom.

    What type of rhetorical device does Reagan use when referring to freedom in this passage?

    O repetition

    Which phrases from the excerpt include loaded words intended to evoke a sense of fear? Select two options.

    O "premeditated invasion"

    O "grave danger"

    Who is Reagan's intended audience for this part of his speech?

    X European trade unionists

    X American historians and educators

    Which rhetorical technique does this paragraph demonstrate?

    Read the excerpt from Ronald Reagan's "Tear Down This Wall" speech.

    In Europe, only one nation and those it controls refuse to join the community of freedom...

    O false dilemma

    Which quotation from Roosevelt's request for a declaration of war is an example of a hasty generalization?

    O "We will gain the inevitable triumph."

    Read Franklin Roosevelt's request for a declaration of war.

    What are the main purposes of this speech? Select two options.

    O to explain why military action is necessary

    O to rally the support of the American people for war

    What is Reagan's main purpose in this passage?

    O to urge an end to communism

    What is the main reason a speaker might use exclusive language?

    O to highlight differences between opposing sides

    Read the excerpt from Franklin Roosevelt's request for a declaration of war.

    Yesterday, December 7, 1941—a date which will live in infamy—the United States of America was suddenly and deliberately attacked by naval and air forces of the Empire of Japan.

    What is the impact of the loaded language in this paragraph?

    O It calls attention to the urgency of the message.

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    Verified questions

    US GOVERNMENT

    Draw Conclusions Why is democracy the political system of the U.S. government?

    Verified answer US GOVERNMENT

    The Supreme Court has ruled that students in public schools have fewer Fourth Amendment protections than the rest of the population. Do you agree or disagree with the Court? Write an opinion essay for your school newspaper in which you explain your position.

    Verified answer US GOVERNMENT

    Infer Why did the Framers believe that an independent judiciary was so important?

    Verified answer US GOVERNMENT

    What is the meaning and importance of a free and responsible press to our democracy?

    Verified answer

    Source : quizlet.com

    15 Logical Fallacies You Should Know Before Getting Into a Debate

    Whether you have a paper to write about logical fallacies or don't want to accidentally include them in your next persuasive essay, we're highlighting the top logical fallacies you need to know.

    15 Logical Fallacies You Should Know Before Getting Into a Debate

    BY EVAN THOMPSON April 20, 2022

    Need help prepping for an argument, or just want to double check your philosophy homework? Below you'll find 15 of the most common logical fallacies.

    Are you ready to discover your college program?

    Types of Logical Fallacies

    Logical fallacies are flawed, deceptive, or false arguments that can be proven wrong with reasoning. These are the most common fallacies you should know about.

    Arguments and debates are an important part of college and academic discourse. But not every argument is perfect. Some can be picked apart because they have errors in reasoning and rhetoric. These are called "logical fallacies," and they're very common.

    You'll hear logical fallacies in the classroom, during televised debates, and in arguments with your friends. It can even be challenging to avoid using them yourself.

    This article lays out some of the most common logical fallacies and how to identify them.

    What Is a Logical Fallacy?

    Logical fallacies are flawed, deceptive, or false arguments that can be proven wrong with reasoning. There are two main types of fallacies:

    A formal fallacy is an argument with a premise and conclusion that doesn't hold up to scrutiny.

    An informal fallacy is an error in the form, content, or context of the argument.

    15 Types of Logical Fallacies

    TABLE OF CONTENTS

    Ad Hominem

    An ad hominem fallacy uses personal attacks rather than logic. This fallacy occurs when someone rejects or criticizes another point of view based on the personal characteristics, ethnic background, physical appearance, or other non-relevant traits of the person who holds it.

    Ad hominem arguments are often used in politics, where they are often called "mudslinging." They are considered unethical because politicians can use them to manipulate voters' opinions against an opponent without addressing core issues.

    Study Tool

    See if you can tell which of these is an ad hominem argument and which is just an insult.

    Straw Man

    A straw man argument attacks a different subject rather than the topic being discussed — often a more extreme version of the counter argument. The purpose of this misdirection is to make one's position look stronger than it actually is.

    The straw man argument is appropriately named after a harmless, lifeless scarecrow. Instead of contending with the actual argument, they attack the equivalent of a lifeless bundle of straw — an easily defeated puppet that the opponent was never arguing for in the first place.

    Study Tool

    See if you can detect how both of the following statements could qualify as strawmen arguments.

    Appeal to Ignorance

    An appeal to ignorance (also known as an "argument from ignorance") argues that a proposition must be true because it has not been proven false or there is no evidence against it.

    The argument can be used to bolster multiple contradictory conclusions at once, such as the following two claims:

    "No one has ever been able to prove that extraterrestrials exist, so they must not be real."

    "No one has ever been able to prove that extraterrestrials do not exist, so they must be real."

    An appeal to ignorance doesn't prove anything. Instead, it shifts the need for proof away from the person making a claim.

    Study Tool

    Which of the following examples is an appeal to ignorance?

    False Dilemma/False Dichotomy

    A false dilemma or false dichotomy presents limited options — typically by focusing on two extremes — when in fact more possibilities exist. The phrase "America: Love it or leave it" is an example of a false dilemma.

    The false dilemma fallacy is a manipulative tool designed to polarize the audience, promoting one side and demonizing another. It's common in political discourse as a way of strong-arming the public into supporting controversial legislation or policies.

    Study Tool

    See if you can come up with a third option that these examples failed to mention.

    Slippery Slope

    A slippery slope argument assumes that a certain course of action will necessarily lead to a chain of future events. The slippery slope fallacy takes a benign premise or starting point and suggests that it will lead to unlikely or ridiculous outcomes with no supporting evidence.

    You may have used this fallacy on your parents as a teenager: "But you have to let me go to the party! If I don't go to the party, I'll be a loser with no friends. Next thing you know, I'll end up alone and jobless, living in your basement when I'm 30!"

    Study Tool

    Which of these examples is a slippery slope fallacy and which is not?

    Circular Argument

    Circular arguments occur when a person's argument repeats what they already assumed before without arriving at a new conclusion. For example, if someone says, "According to my brain, my brain is reliable," that's a circular argument.

    Circular arguments often use a claim as both a premise and a conclusion. This fallacy only appears to be an argument when in fact it's just restating one's assumptions.

    Source : thebestschools.org

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    James 7 month ago
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    Guys, does anyone know the answer?

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