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    3 Most Common Mental Health Disorders in America

    One in five adults in America experience a mental illness during their lifetime. Right now, nearly 10 million Americans (1 in 25) are living with a serious mental disorder including anxiety, depression and bipolar. Learn more from ACCESS.

    3 Most Common Mental Health Disorders in America

    November 18, 2021

    Millions of Americans live with mental health issues. Thankfully, the conversation is shifting from taboo to a more public and healthy approach. Mental health is defined as your psychological and emotional well-being. According to mentalhealth.gov, this can be affected by many biological factors such as genetics, brain chemistry; life experiences such as trauma and abuse; or a family history of mental health problems.

    The National Alliance of Mental Health reports that one in five adults in America experiences a mental illness in their lifetime. Right now, nearly 10 million Americans are living with a serious mental disorder. The most common are anxiety disorders major depression and bipolar disorder.

    Below is more information on these disorders and how ACCESS can help. Remember you are not alone, and medical experts are here to support you:

    Anxiety disordersAccording to the Anxiety and Depression Association of America, this disorder is highly treatable, but only around 37 percent of those affected actually receive treatment. It is common to be diagnosed with both anxiety and depression. Symptoms can include excessive worrying, feeling agitated, restlessness, fatigue, tense muscles, difficulty sleeping, and panic attacks. A diagnosis for anxiety can only be made by a medical professional and includes a physical exam.Major depressive disorderMajor depressive disorder is the leading cause of disability for Americans aged 15 to 44. This disorder is more prevalent in women than men. Some of the symptoms include depressed mood, diminished interest or pleasure, change in weight, appetite and sleep patterns, fatigue, and a feeling of worthlessness. This can only be diagnosed with a consultation with a medical provider.Bipolar disorderBipolar disorders affect men and women equally. The median age for diagnosed bipolar disorder is around 25 years old, but it can develop later in life as well. Those who suffer from bipolar disorder experience manic episodes where their moods and behaviors are drastically different than normal. These changes can include unusual energy, activity or sleep patterns. Diagnosis for bipolar disorder may include a physical exam, a psychiatric evaluation, and charting of your mood over time.Access Community Health Network (ACCESS)

    If you are experiencing problems that prevent you from feeling your best, or you are struggling with the effects of trauma, ACCESS medical and behavioral health providers can help. We treat depression, anxiety and other mental health conditions, as well as help patients dealing with trauma.  We can also help you identify those behaviors that are limiting you, build your confidence and support you in reaching your goals for overall health and wellness. Visit our website to find your local ACCESS health center and schedule an appointment today.

    Source : www.achn.net

    Facts & Statistics

    Did You Know? Anxiety disorders are the most common mental illness in the U.S., affecting 40 million adults in the United States age 18 and older, or 18.1% of the population every year. Anxiety disorders are highly treatable, yet only 36.9% of those suffering receive treatment. People with an anxiety disorder are three to five times more likely to go to the doctor and six times more likely to be hospitalized for psychiatric disorders than those who do not suffer from anxiety disorders. Anxiety disorders develop from a complex set of risk factor

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    Did You Know?

    Anxiety disorders are the most common mental illness in the U.S., affecting 40 million adults in the United States age 18 and older, or 18.1% of the population every year.

    Anxiety disorders are highly treatable, yet only 36.9% of those suffering receive treatment.

    People with an anxiety disorder are three to five times more likely to go to the doctor and six times more likely to be hospitalized for psychiatric disorders than those who do not suffer from anxiety disorders.

    Anxiety disorders develop from a complex set of risk factors, including genetics, brain chemistry, personality, and life events.

    Anxiety and Depression

    It's not uncommon for someone with an anxiety disorder to also suffer from depression or vice versa. Nearly one-half of those diagnosed with depression are also diagnosed with an anxiety disorder. Find out more about depression.

    Facts

    Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD)

    GAD affects 6.8 million adults, or 3.1% of the U.S. population, yet only 43.2% are receiving treatment.

    Women are twice as likely to be affected as men. GAD often co-occurs with major depression.

    Panic Disorder (PD)

    PD affects 6 million adults, or 2.7% of the U.S. population.

    Women are twice as likely to be affected as men.

    Social Anxiety Disorder

    SAD affects 15 million adults, or 6.8% of the U.S. population.

    SAD is equally common among men and women and typically begins around age 13. According to a 2007 ADAA survey, 36% of people with social anxiety disorder report experiencing symptoms for 10 or more years before seeking help.

    Specific Phobias

    Specific phobias affect 19 million adults, or 8.7% of the U.S. population.

    Women are twice as likely to be affected as men.

    Symptoms typically begin in childhood; the average age-of-onset is 7 years old.

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are closely related to anxiety disorders, which some may experience at the same time, along with depression.

    Stress

    Everyone experiences stress and anxiety at one time or another. The difference between them is that stress is a response to a threat in a situation. Anxiety is a reaction to the stress. Read APA: Stress in America: A National Mental Health Crisis (Oct 2020)

    Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD)

    OCD affects 2.2 million adults, or 1.0% of the U.S. population.

    OCD is equally common among men and women.

    The average age of onset is 19, with 25 percent of cases occurring by age 14. One-third of affected adults first experienced symptoms in childhood.

    Post-traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)

    PTSD affects 7.7 million adults, or 3.5% of the U.S. population.

    Women are more likely to be affected than men.

    Rape is the most likely trigger of PTSD: 65% of men and 45.9% of women who are raped will develop the disorder.

    Childhood sexual abuse is a strong predictor of lifetime likelihood for developing PTSD.

    Major Depressive Disorder

    The leading cause of disability in the U.S. for ages 15 to 44.3.

    MDD affects more than 16.1 million American adults, or about 6.7%of the U.S. population age 18 and older in a given year.

    While major depressive disorder can develop at any age, the median age at onset is 32.5 years old.

    More prevalent in women than in men.

    Persistent depressive disorder, or PDD,(formerly called dysthymia) is a form of depression that usually continues for at least two years.

    Affects approximately 1.5 percent of the U.S. population age 18 and older in a given year. (about 3.3 million American adults). Only 61.7% of adults with MDD are receiving treatment. The average age of onset is 31 years old. (Source: National Institute of Mental Health)

    Related Illnesses

    Many people with an anxiety disorder also have a co-occurring disorder or physical illness, which can make their symptoms worse and recovery more difficult. It’s essential to be treated for both disorders.

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are closely related to anxiety disorders, which some may experience at the same time, along with depression.

    Read on to learn more about the co-occurrence of anxiety and these disorders:

    Bipolar disorder Eating disorders Headaches

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS)

    Sleep disorders Substance abuse

    Adult ADHD (attention deficit/hyperactive disorder)

    BDD (body dysmorphic disorder)

    Chronic pain Fibromyalgia Stress

    Children

    Anxiety disorders affect 25.1% of children between 13 and 18 years old. Research shows that untreated children with anxiety disorders are at higher risk to perform poorly in school, miss out on important social experiences, and engage in substance abuse.

    See statistics for anxiety disorders among children from the National Institute of Mental Health.

    Anxiety disorders also often co-occur with other disorders such as depression, eating disorders, and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).

    Source : adaa.org

    Mental Health Disorder Statistics

    According to mental health disorder statistics, 1 in 4 U.S. adults suffer from a diagnosable mental disorder.

    Health

    Mental Health Disorder Statistics

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    Statistics related to mental health disorders

    The following are the latest statistics available from the National Institute of Mental Health Disorders, part of the National Institutes of Health:

    Mental health disorders account for several of the top causes of disability in established market economies, such as the U.S., worldwide, and include: major depression (also called clinical depression), manic depression (also called bipolar disorder), schizophrenia, and obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    An estimated 26% of Americans ages 18 and older -- about 1 in 4 adults -- suffers from a diagnosable mental disorder in a given year.

    Many people suffer from more than one mental disorder at a given time. In particular, depressive illnesses tend to co-occur with substance abuse and anxiety disorders.

    Approximately 9.5% of American adults ages 18 and over, will suffer from a depressive illness (major depression, bipolar disorder, or dysthymia) each year.

    Women are nearly twice as likely to suffer from major depression than men. However, men and women are equally likely to develop bipolar disorder.

    While major depression can develop at any age, the average age at onset is the mid-20s.

    With bipolar disorder, which affects approximately 2.6% of Americans age 18 and older in a given year -- the average age at onset for a first manic episode is during the early 20s.

    Most people who commit suicide have a diagnosable mental disorder -- most commonly a depressive disorder or a substance abuse disorder.

    Four times as many men than women commit suicide. However, women attempt suicide more often than men.

    The highest suicide rates in the U.S. are found in Caucasian men over age 85. However, suicide is also one of the leading causes of death in adolescents and adults ages 15 to 24.

    Approximately 1% of Americans are affected by schizophrenia.

    In most cases, schizophrenia first appears in men during their late teens or early 20s. In women, schizophrenia often first appears during their 20s or early 30s.

    Approximately about 18% of people ages 18- 54 in a given year, have an anxiety disorder in a given year. Anxiety disorders include: panic disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), and phobias (social phobia, agoraphobia, and specific phobia).

    Panic disorder typically develops in late adolescence or early adulthood.

    The first symptoms of OCD often begin during childhood or adolescence.

    GAD can begin at any time, though the risk is highest between childhood and middle age.

    Individuals with OCD frequently can have problems with substance abuse or depressive or eating disorders.

    Social phobia typically begins in childhood or adolescence.

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    Source : www.hopkinsmedicine.org

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