if you want to remove an article from website contact us from top.

    what is the difference between juneteenth and independence day?

    James

    Guys, does anyone know the answer?

    get what is the difference between juneteenth and independence day? from EN Bilgi.

    Juneteenth and July 4th: A tale of two Independence Days

    Eastern PA Conference of the UMC

    Navigation

    Home |News |Juneteenth and July 4th: A tale of two Independence Days

    Juneteenth and July 4th: A tale of two Independence Days

    Jul 01, 2021 | By John W. Coleman

    At a time when America’s freedom is endangered by efforts to restrict or even thwart voting rights for all, it may be timely for us to have two holidays to celebrate our nation’s freedom and independence—both actual and aspirational. July 4th ends a two-week, bookended period of equally important occasions that one might call our Freedom Days. It began with historic significance in our first celebration of Juneteenth, June 19, as a national holiday.

    And now we celebrate this Independence Day six months after our nation’s democratic values came under a brutal attack that bewildered and dismayed many citizens. Un-civil insurrectionists stormed the U.S. Capitol and sought to abort the certification of our 2020 Presidential election outcome. Now one house of Congress is about to investigate what is still an evolving and disturbing drama that begs for more thorough analysis and remediation.

    “Man is born free. Yet, everywhere he is in chains,” wrote Jean-Jacques Rousseau in The Social Contract. On July 4, 1776, the U.S. declared its independence from Great Britain. But for nearly 90 more years the chains of chattel slavery continued to rattle, chafe and imprison millions of African Americans. Admittedly, many still hear the harsh echoes of those chains and feel their biting sting even today.

    Its own Declaration of Independence did not fully free this emerging nation until it signed the Treaty of Paris to end the Revolutionary War in 1783. But it allowed General George Washington to form a legal army of citizens.

    Likewise, President Abraham Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation, approved by Congress on January 1, 1863, did not really emancipate the Confederate States’ slaves. But it did allow the Union Army to legally recruit and accept escaped slaves as soldiers, for they were no longer to be considered anyone’s property.

    A mural in Galveston, Texas, marks the spot where General Order No. 3 was issued

    Indeed, when General Gordon Granger entered Galveston, Texas, on June 19, 1865, to tell the last remaining slaves there that they were free, his freedom orders were enforced by a full complement of African American U.S. soldiers who accompanied him. Many people don’t realize how much or for how long African Americans have been agents of their own liberation.

    Years after slavery ended, the former Galveston slave Margrett Nillin was asked if she preferred slavery or freedom. She answered unequivocally, “Well, it is this way. In slavery I owned nothing. In freedom I owned a home and raised my family. Which all causes me to worry; and in slavery I has no worries. But I takes freedom.”

    “But I takes freedom.” So what has long been known variously as Jubilee Day, Freedom Day, Liberation Day and Emancipation Day—first celebrated in Texas black church gatherings—is now, thanks to a Congressional voting majority and President Joe Biden’s signature, officially Juneteenth National Independence Day, to commemorate the end of slavery in our nation.

    Oh, and thanks also to 94-year-old Texas activist Opal Lee and her four-decade struggle to bring this national holiday to pass. She was able to hold the hand of Kamala Harris, America’s first woman and first person of color to serve as Vice President, and to hear her describe the significance of Juneteenth at the White House before introducing the President.

    When I search Google using the title of this essay—“Juneteenth and July 4th”—I find a plethora of poster and t-shirt images that read “July 4th didn’t set me free. Juneteenth is my independence day.” Now that we have two National Independence Days, I suppose new messages embracing both may join those images in the future.

    Yes, a tale of two Independence Days… because we needed two to get it right. Sort of like Jesus touching the blind man’s eyes twice to fully heal him and restore his sight. (Mark 8:22-25)

    And we’re still trying to get it right. Trying not to reverse the many, arduous steps forward with too many backward stumbles. Trying not to make America hate again, while many of its people are only now learning to truly love—especially to love “the other.”

    “Justice is what love looks like in public,” says the Rev. Cornel West. And finally, we are learning to make love prevail by making it public.

    I wanted to attend St. Daniel’s UMC’s 10th annual Juneteenth celebration in Chester. Instead I attended the first celebration in Willow Grove, hosted by Willow Grove UMC, in its first onsite gathering since the pandemic closed the church in 2020.

    Sharia Wallace, a young African American neighbor of this predominantly white church, asked them to host it so that the town council would approve it, the Rev. Lorelei Toombs, pastor, told me. Wallace is an inspiring entrepreneur and community organizer. The church parking lot, lawn and adjacent streets overflowed with sheer joy, flavored by loud music, colors, food, vendors’ stands, and kinetic community life.

    Source : www.epaumc.org

    What Is Juneteenth?

    On June 19, 1865, enslaved African Americans in Texas were told they were free. A century and a half later, people across the U.S. continue to celebrate the day, which is now a federal holiday.

    Already a subscriber? Log in

    Keep reading The Times by creating a free account or logging in.

    CONTINUE

    Support independent journalism.

    See subscription options

    Source : www.nytimes.com

    Juneteenth

    Juneteenth, official name of federal holiday Juneteenth National Independence Day, also called Emancipation Day, Freedom Day, Jubilee Day, Black Independence Day, and Juneteenth Independence Day, holiday commemorating the end of slavery in the United States, observed annually on June 19. Juneteenth is celebrated on Sunday, June 19, 2022. In 1863, during the American Civil War, Pres. Abraham Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation, which declared more than three million slaves living in the Confederate states to be free. More than two years would pass, however, before the news reached African Americans living in Texas. It was not until Union soldiers arrived

    Juneteenth

    United States holiday

    Alternate titles: Black Independence Day, Emancipation Day, Jubilee Day, Juneteenth Independence Day, Juneteenth National Independence Day

    By The Editors of Encyclopaedia Britannica • Last Updated: Apr 19, 2022 • Edit History

    Juneteenth parade See all media

    Related Topics: United States African Americans June emancipation slavery in the United States

    See all related content →

    Top Questions What is Juneteenth?

    When is Juneteenth?

    What is the origin of Juneteenth?

    Is Juneteenth a federal holiday?

    How is Juneteenth celebrated?

    How did the American civil rights movement affect Juneteenth celebrations?

    Juneteenth, official name of federal holiday Juneteenth National Independence Day, also called Emancipation Day, Freedom Day, Jubilee Day, Black Independence Day, and Juneteenth Independence Day, holiday commemorating the end of slavery in the United States, observed annually on June 19. Juneteenth is celebrated on Sunday, June 19, 2022.

    Juneteenth: All your questions, answered

    Discover the history of Juneteenth, a federal holiday commemorating the end of slavery in the United States.

    Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc.

    See all videos for this article

    In 1863, during the American Civil War, Pres. Abraham Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation, which declared more than three million slaves living in the Confederate states to be free. More than two years would pass, however, before the news reached African Americans living in Texas. It was not until Union soldiers arrived in Galveston, Texas, on June 19, 1865, that the state’s residents finally learned that slavery had been abolished. The former slaves immediately began to celebrate with prayer, feasting, song, and dance.

    Emancipation Proclamation

    Emancipation Proclamation, 1863.

    NARA Juneteenth

    African Americans celebrating the anniversary of the end of slavery in Washington, D.C., 1866.

    © North Wind Picture Archives

    READ MORE ON THIS TOPIC

    What Is the History of Juneteenth?

    On June 19, 1865, enslaved Texans first learned of the Emancipation Proclamation—over two years after it was issued. Why did news of it...

    The following year, on June 19, the first official Juneteenth celebrations took place in Texas. The original observances included prayer meetings and the singing of spirituals, and celebrants wore new clothes as a way of representing their newfound freedom. Within a few years, African Americans in other states were celebrating the day as well, making it an annual tradition. Celebrations have continued across the United States into the 21st century and typically include prayer and religious services, speeches, educational events, family gatherings and picnics, and festivals with music, food, and dancing.

    Discover the history of Juneteenth, a holiday commemorating the end of slavery in the United States

    Learn more about Juneteenth, the holiday that celebrates the end of slavery in the United States. It is observed every year on June 19.

    Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc.

    See all videos for this article

    Juneteenth became a state holiday in Texas in 1980, and a number of other states subsequently followed suit. In 2021 Juneteenth was made a federal holiday. The day is also celebrated outside the United States, being used by organizations in a number of countries to recognize the end of slavery and to honour the culture and achievements of African Americans.

    The Editors of Encyclopaedia BritannicaThis article was most recently revised and updated by Amy Tikkanen.

    Source : www.britannica.com

    Do you want to see answer or more ?
    James 15 day ago
    4

    Guys, does anyone know the answer?

    Click For Answer