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    what is the difference between a mechanical wave and an electromagnetic wave? a mechanical wave travels through empty space, while an electromagnetic wave travels through matter. a mechanical wave has a short wavelength, while all electromagnetic waves have long wavelengths. a mechanical wave has a high frequency, while all electromagnetic waves have low frequencies. a mechanical wave travels through matter, while an electromagnetic wave travels through empty space.

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    get what is the difference between a mechanical wave and an electromagnetic wave? a mechanical wave travels through empty space, while an electromagnetic wave travels through matter. a mechanical wave has a short wavelength, while all electromagnetic waves have long wavelengths. a mechanical wave has a high frequency, while all electromagnetic waves have low frequencies. a mechanical wave travels through matter, while an electromagnetic wave travels through empty space. from EN Bilgi.

    Anatomy of an Electromagnetic Wave

    Energy, a measure of the ability to do work, comes in many forms and can transform from one type to another. Examples of stored or potential energy include batteries and water behind a dam. Objects in motion are examples of kinetic energy. Charged particles—such as electrons and protons—create electromagnetic fields when they move, and these fields transport the type of energy

    Anatomy of an Electromagnetic Wave

    Energy, a measure of the ability to do work, comes in many forms and can transform from one type to another. Examples of stored or potential energy include batteries and water behind a dam. Objects in motion are examples of kinetic energy. Charged particles—such as electrons and protons—create electromagnetic fields when they move, and these fields transport the type of energy we call electromagnetic radiation, or light.

    What are Electromagnetic and Mechanical waves?

    Mechanical waves and electromagnetic waves are two important ways that energy is transported in the world around us. Waves in water and sound waves in air are two examples of mechanical waves. Mechanical waves are caused by a disturbance or vibration in matter, whether solid, gas, liquid, or plasma. Matter that waves are traveling through is called a medium. Water waves are formed by vibrations in a liquid and sound waves are formed by vibrations in a gas (air). These mechanical waves travel through a medium by causing the molecules to bump into each other, like falling dominoes transferring energy from one to the next. Sound waves cannot travel in the vacuum of space because there is no medium to transmit these mechanical waves.

    Classical waves transfer energy without transporting matter through the medium. Waves in a pond do not carry the water molecules from place to place; rather the wave's energy travels through the water, leaving the water molecules in place, much like a bug bobbing on top of ripples in water.

    When a balloon is rubbed against a head of hair, astatic electric charge is created causing their individual hairs to repel one another. Credit: Ginger Butcher

    ELECTROMAGNETIC WAVES

    Electricity can be static, like the energy that can make your hair stand on end. Magnetism can also be static, as it is in a refrigerator magnet. A changing magnetic field will induce a changing electric field and vice-versa—the two are linked. These changing fields form electromagnetic waves. Electromagnetic waves differ from mechanical waves in that they do not require a medium to propagate. This means that electromagnetic waves can travel not only through air and solid materials, but also through the vacuum of space.

    In the 1860's and 1870's, a Scottish scientist named James Clerk Maxwell developed a scientific theory to explain electromagnetic waves. He noticed that electrical fields and magnetic fields can couple together to form electromagnetic waves. He summarized this relationship between electricity and magnetism into what are now referred to as "Maxwell's Equations."

    Heinrich Hertz, a German physicist, applied Maxwell's theories to the production and reception of radio waves. The unit of frequency of a radio wave -- one cycle per second -- is named the hertz, in honor of Heinrich Hertz.

    His experiment with radio waves solved two problems. First, he had demonstrated in the concrete, what Maxwell had only theorized — that the velocity of radio waves was equal to the velocity of light! This proved that radio waves were a form of light! Second, Hertz found out how to make the electric and magnetic fields detach themselves from wires and go free as Maxwell's waves — electromagnetic waves.

    WAVES OR PARTICLES? YES!

    Light is made of discrete packets of energy called photons. Photons carry momentum, have no mass, and travel at the speed of light. All light has both particle-like and wave-like properties. How an instrument is designed to sense the light influences which of these properties are observed. An instrument that diffracts light into a spectrum for analysis is an example of observing the wave-like property of light. The particle-like nature of light is observed by detectors used in digital cameras—individual photons liberate electrons that are used for the detection and storage of the image data.

    POLARIZATION

    One of the physical properties of light is that it can be polarized. Polarization is a measurement of the electromagnetic field's alignment. In the figure above, the electric field (in red) is vertically polarized. Think of a throwing a Frisbee at a picket fence. In one orientation it will pass through, in another it will be rejected. This is similar to how sunglasses are able to eliminate glare by absorbing the polarized portion of the light.

    DESCRIBING ELECTROMAGNETIC ENERGY

    The terms light, electromagnetic waves, and radiation all refer to the same physical phenomenon: electromagnetic energy. This energy can be described by frequency, wavelength, or energy. All three are related mathematically such that if you know one, you can calculate the other two. Radio and microwaves are usually described in terms of frequency (Hertz), infrared and visible light in terms of wavelength (meters), and x-rays and gamma rays in terms of energy (electron volts). This is a scientific convention that allows the convenient use of units that have numbers that are neither too large nor too small.

    Source : science.nasa.gov

    Physical Science

    Start studying Physical Science - The Electromagnetic Spectrum. Learn vocabulary, terms, and more with flashcards, games, and other study tools.

    Physical Science - The Electromagnetic Spectrum

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    What is the difference between a mechanical wave and an electromagnetic wave?

    A mechanical wave travels through empty space, while an electromagnetic wave travels through matter.

    A mechanical wave has a short wavelength, while all electromagnetic waves have long wavelengths.

    A mechanical wave has a high frequency, while all electromagnetic waves have low frequencies.

    A mechanical wave travels through matter, while an electromagnetic wave travels through empty space.

    Click card to see definition 👆

    A mechanical wave travels through matter, while an electromagnetic wave travels through empty space.

    Click again to see term 👆

    Which electromagnetic waves have the shortest wavelength and the highest frequency?

    Click card to see definition 👆

    Gamma waves

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    1/18 Created by What_A_Weird_Rose

    Terms in this set (18)

    What is the difference between a mechanical wave and an electromagnetic wave?

    A mechanical wave travels through empty space, while an electromagnetic wave travels through matter.

    A mechanical wave has a short wavelength, while all electromagnetic waves have long wavelengths.

    A mechanical wave has a high frequency, while all electromagnetic waves have low frequencies.

    A mechanical wave travels through matter, while an electromagnetic wave travels through empty space.

    A mechanical wave travels through matter, while an electromagnetic wave travels through empty space.

    Which electromagnetic waves have the shortest wavelength and the highest frequency?

    Gamma waves

    Use the drop-down menus to identify the electromagnetic waves.

    A : radio waves C : infrared D : visible light G : gamma rays

    What are three ways in which people use microwaves?

    Sample Response: They are used to transmit data, TV signals, and telephone signals. They are also used in ovens and radar.

    Compared to visible light, the wavelength of X-rays is [-blank-] and the frequency is [-blank-].

    shorter higher

    Which are characteristics of electromagnetic waves? Check all that apply.

    They travel only through matter.

    Waves with a higher frequency have a shorter wavelength.

    Waves with a higher frequency have a longer wavelength.

    They all move at the same speed.

    They can travel through space.

    Waves with a higher frequency have a shorter wavelength.

    They all move at the same speed.

    They can travel through space.

    Olivia wants to find out whether a substance will fluoresce. She says she should put it in a microwave oven. Do you agree with her? Why or why not?

    Sample Response: I disagree with her because many substances show fluorescence under ultraviolet light, not microwaves.

    What makes thermal imaging cameras useful?

    They can detect differences in color.

    They can detect differences in wave speeds.

    They can detect differences in temperature.

    They can detect mechanical waves.

    They can detect differences in temperature

    Which part of the electromagnetic spectrum is typically used to make images based on the temperatures of objects?

    X-rays radio waves infrared light visible light infrared light

    A veterinarian thinks that a dog has swallowed a key ring. Which types of electromagnetic waves is the doctor most likely to use to check the dog?

    gamma rays microwaves radio waves X-rays X-rays

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    Electromagnetic Waves vs. Mechanical Waves Science Games

    Curriculum games for electromagnetic waves vs. mechanical waves, based on NGSS & state standards. Learn how to differentiate these two types of waves.

    ELECTROMAGNETIC WAVES VS. MECHANICAL WAVES SCIENCE GAMES

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    In this series of games, your students will learn the similarities and differences between two types of waves. The Electromagnetic Waves vs. Mechanical Waves learning objective — based on NGSS and state standards — delivers improved student engagement and academic performance in your classroom, as demonstrated by research.

    Scroll down for a preview of this learning objective’s games and the concepts they drive home.

    Concepts Covered

    Waves are disturbances that transfer energy from one place to another. Mechanical waves travel through matter, causing it to vibrate, expand and contract, move up and down, side to side, or in circles. They include water waves, sound waves, and seismic waves.

    Light is the transfer of energy via electromagnetic waves. Unlike mechanical waves, which require matter, electromagnetic waves can travel through empty space, as well as through liquids, solids, and gases.

    There are many similarities between light waves and mechanical waves. They can both be measured by their amplitude, wavelength, and frequency. When they interact with matter, they can be reflected, transmitted, absorbed, refracted, or diffracted.

    Visible light, radio waves, microwaves, infrared radiation, ultraviolet, x-rays, and gamma rays make up the electromagnetic spectrum. They all travel at the same speed — the speed of light — in a vacuum, but when they come into contact with matter, they slow down.

    Light keeps traveling through space until it encounters matter. Some of the light we see from faraway stars has been traveling through empty space for billions of years.

    A preview of each game in the learning objective is found below.

    You can access all of the games on Legends of Learning for free, forever, with a teacher account. A free teacher account also allows you to create playlists of games and assignments for students and track class progress. Sign up for free today!

    Tags: light, color, wave, electromagnetic, mechanical, longitudinal, transverse, sound, matter, amplitude, frequency, wavelength, space, spectrum

    Eureka - Fluxcharger

    Estimated Duration: 6 minutes

    Eureka! You've found it! In this search and find game, you will have to search around a lab for mini-games and information about electromagnetic and mechanical waves. You will find five items in the lab, and each item will take you to a different mini-game. You will complete puzzles and activities that test your hand-eye coordination. Complete all five mini-games to win!

    Castle of Sand: Electromagnetic vs Mechanical Wave

    Estimated Duration: 9 minutes

    En route to the beach, you embark upon a brave journey to learn about electromagnetic and mechanical waves and fight monsters to gain hidden treasure. Answer questions to gain entry to each room where a monster is hiding to protect the ruby treasure. You will use your bucket and beach umbrella to attack and defend against this monster for the treasure. Grab your umbrella, and let's go!

    Electro Buster

    Estimated Duration: 11 minutes

    Say hello, because in this game you will be learning all about waves! You will knock down flying objects and score points. As you play, question marks will fly across the screen and you will be asked a multiple choice question to demonstrate your knowledge of waves. As you progress, you will learn more information, answer more questions, and knock down more objects as they fly at faster speeds!

    Educagent

    Estimated Duration: 20 minutes

    You are tasked with infiltrating the headquarters of a corrupt corporation. You must make it to the mainframe computer on the top floor to collect evidence for an investigation.

    Waves Intro - Water

    Estimated Duration: 10 minutes

    Make waves with a dripping faucet, and observe the top-view or side-view of the wave. Adjust the frequency and amplitude, and observe the changes in the wave. Design experiments to measure wavelength and wave speed. Note: Students will automatically move through this simulation after 10 minutes of playtime.

    Waves Intro - Sound

    Estimated Duration: 10 minutes

    Make sound waves with a speaker, and hear the tone it produces. Adjust the frequency and amplitude, and observe the changes in the wave. Design experiments to measure wavelength and wave speed. Note: Students will automatically move through this simulation after 10 minutes of playtime.

    Source : www.legendsoflearning.com

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