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    The Tragedy of Julius Caesar, Part 2: Causal Relationships 100% Flashcards

    Study with Quizlet and memorize flashcards terms like What types of irony are used in Shakespeare's Julius Caesar? Select three options., Which statement best describes a cause-and-effect relationship in a play?, [BRUTUS.] Let us be sacrificers, but not butchers, Caius.We all stand up against the spirit of Caesar,And in the spirit of men there is no blood.O, that we then could come by Caesar's spirit,And not dismember Caesar! Why is this passage an example of verbal irony? and more.

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    What types of irony are used in Shakespeare's Julius Caesar? Select three options.

    Click card to see definition 👆

    situational irony dramatic irony verbal irony

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    Which statement best describes a cause-and-effect relationship in a play?

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    One action is a cause, which leads to another action that is the effect of the first action.

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    Terms in this set (10)

    What types of irony are used in Shakespeare's Julius Caesar? Select three options.

    situational irony dramatic irony verbal irony

    Which statement best describes a cause-and-effect relationship in a play?

    One action is a cause, which leads to another action that is the effect of the first action.

    [BRUTUS.] Let us be sacrificers, but not butchers, Caius.We all stand up against the spirit of Caesar,And in the spirit of men there is no blood.O, that we then could come by Caesar's spirit,And not dismember Caesar!

    Why is this passage an example of verbal irony?

    Brutus says he does not want to be seen as a butcher, but that is what the Romans will remember after he stabs his friend.

    What is Cassius's motivation for sending the messages?

    Cassius wants to sway Brutus with flattering messages to convince him to help kill Caesar.

    How does Cassius's proclamation affect Casca?

    Casca says that he will also fight Caesar's rise to power.

    What is ironic about discussing whether or not to include Cicero in the conspiracy? Select two options.

    Casca firmly reverses his position about including Cicero, as if he hadn't been the one to suggest it in the first place.

    Casca thinks he is making important decisions when Brutus is really the one leading the way.

    Why do authors use causal relationships in plays? Select three options.

    to create mystery and tension

    to propel the plot forward

    to develop rising action

    Why is this excerpt an example of verbal irony?

    Cassius portrays Caesar as a cruel-hearted tyrant, and at the same time says he pitties Caesar because Caesar can't help himself.

    How can you infer a character's motivation? Select three options.

    by identifying a specific thought, feeling, or action

    by looking at what the author or others say about the character

    by looking for and citing evidence in the text as to why the character might think, feel, or act that way

    Which situation is an example of dramatic irony?

    The audience knows all about the plot to kill Caesar, but Caesar himself knows nothing.

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    Cicero's rhetorical theory (Chapter 2)

    The Cambridge Companion to Cicero - May 2013

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    2 - Cicero's rhetorical theory

    2 - Cicero's rhetorical theory from Part I - The Greco-Roman intellectual

    Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 April 2013

    By John Dugan Edited by Catherine Steel Show author details Catherine Steel Affiliation:

    University of Glasgow

    Chapter Chapter Book contents

    The Cambridge Companion to Cicero

    Series page

    The Cambridge Companion to Cicero

    Copyright page Dedication Contents Map

    Notes on contributors

    Frontispiece

    List of abbreviations

    Introduction Part I

    The Greco-Roman intellectual

    1

    Cicero and the intellectual milieu of the late Republic

    2

    Cicero's rhetorical theory

    3 Cicero's style 4 Writing philosophy 5 Cicero's poetry 6

    The law in Cicero's writings

    7

    Cicero and Roman identity

    Part II

    The Roman politician

    Part III

    Receptions of Cicero

    Cicero's works Bibliography Index locorum General index Get access

    Summary

    A summary is not available for this content so a preview has been provided. Please use the Get access link above for information on how to access this content.

    Type Chapter Information

    The Cambridge Companion to Cicero , pp. 25 - 40

    DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CCO9781139048750.004

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    Publisher: Cambridge University Press

    Print publication year: 2013

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    Cicero's Construction of Consular Ethos in the First Catilinarian on JSTOR

    William W. Batstone, Cicero's Construction of Consular Ethos in the First Catilinarian, Transactions of the American Philological Association (1974-2014), Vol. 124 (1994), pp. 211-266

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    JOURNAL ARTICLE William W. Batstone

    Transactions of the American Philological Association (1974-2014)

    , pp. 211-266 (56 pages)

    Published By: The Johns Hopkins University Press

    https://www.jstor.org/stable/284292

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    Transactions of the American Philological Association (TAPA) is the official research publication of the Society for Classical Studies (SCS). The SCS is a learned society of scholars of the culture and history of the Greek and Roman antiquity. As the flagship publication of one of the largest professional associations in the field of classical studies, TAPA reflects the wide range of research conducted by classicists. Consequently, TAPA includes contributions across the broad spectrum of contemporary methodology, from the most traditional to the most innovative.

    One of the largest publishers in the United States, the Johns Hopkins University Press combines traditional books and journals publishing units with cutting-edge service divisions that sustain diversity and independence among nonprofit, scholarly publishers, societies, and associations. Journals The Press is home to the largest journal publication program of any U.S.-based university press. The Journals Division publishes 85 journals in the arts and humanities, technology and medicine, higher education, history, political science, and library science. The division also manages membership services for more than 50 scholarly and professional associations and societies. Books With critically acclaimed titles in history, science, higher education, consumer health, humanities, classics, and public health, the Books Division publishes 150 new books each year and maintains a backlist in excess of 3,000 titles. With warehouses on three continents, worldwide sales representation, and a robust digital publishing program, the Books Division connects Hopkins authors to scholars, experts, and educational and research institutions around the world. Project MUSE® Project MUSE is a leading provider of digital humanities and social sciences content, providing access to journal and book content from nearly 300 publishers. MUSE delivers outstanding results to the scholarly community by maximizing revenues for publishers, providing value to libraries, and enabling access for scholars worldwide. Hopkins Fulfillment Services (HFS) HFS provides print and digital distribution for a distinguished list of university presses and nonprofit institutions. HFS clients enjoy state-of-the-art warehousing, real-time access to critical business data, accounts receivable management and collection, and unparalleled customer service.

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    Transactions of the American Philological Association (1974-2014) © 1994 American Philological Association

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