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    what is a couplet, in the context of a shakespearean sonnet? the final two lines any two lines that rhyme two adjacent syllables in which the first syllable is stressed two adjacent syllables in which the second syllable is stressed

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    What is a couplet, in the context of a Shakespearean sonnet?

    What is a couplet, in the context of a Shakespearean sonnet?? (Multiple Choice Questions and Answers) >>

    What is a couplet, in the context of a Shakespearean sonnet?

    What is a couplet, in the context of a Shakespearean sonnet?

    This is a List of Available Answers Options :

    any two lines that rhyme

    the final two lines

    two adjacent syllables in which the first syllable is stressed

    two adjacent syllables in which the second syllable is stressed

    The best answer is B. the final two lines.

    Reported from teachers around the world. The correct answer to ❝What is a couplet, in the context of a Shakespearean sonnet?❞ question is B. the final two lines.

    I Recommend you to read the next question and answer, Namely Read Shakespeare`s `Sonnet 100.” Where art thou, Muse, that thou forget`st so longTo speak of that which gives thee all thy might?Spend`st thou thy fury on some worthless song,Darkening thy power to lend base subjects light?Return, forgetful Muse, and straight redeemIn gentle numbers time so idly spent;Sing to the ear that doth thy lays esteemAnd gives thy pen both skill and argument.Rise, resty Muse, my love`s sweet face survey,If Time have any wrinkle graven there;If any, be a satire to decay,And make Time`s spoils despised every where.Give my love fame faster than Time wastes life;So thou prevent`st his scythe and crooked knife. What is the central idea of the third quatrain? with very accurate answers.

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    Analyzing Different Interpretations of a Sonnet, Analyzing Different Interpretations of a Sonnet Flashcards

    Start studying Analyzing Different Interpretations of a Sonnet, Analyzing Different Interpretations of a Sonnet. Learn vocabulary, terms, and more with flashcards, games, and other study tools.

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    What is the rhyme scheme of the second quatrain?

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    cdcd

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    Which statements describe the last two lines of a Shakespearean sonnet? Select three options.

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    They rhyme with each other.

    They are referred to as a couplet.

    They may reinterpret the poem's meaning.

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    1/21 Created by Argentunited123

    Terms in this set (21)

    What is the rhyme scheme of the second quatrain?

    cdcd

    Which statements describe the last two lines of a Shakespearean sonnet? Select three options.

    They rhyme with each other.

    They are referred to as a couplet.

    They may reinterpret the poem's meaning.

    What evidence supports the serious nature of the sonnet? Select two options.

    "I love to hear her speak"

    "And yet by heaven, I think my love as rare"

    The underlined section is referred to as a(n)

    quatrain.

    Which words and phrases in the sonnet indicate that the tone is satirical? Select two options.

    "black wires" "reeks"

    In poetry, the term speaker refers to the

    narrator

    Which context clues support the definition of Muse as an "inspiration for writing poetry"? Select three options.

    "Spend'st thou thy fury on some worthless song"

    "the ear that doth thy lays esteem"

    "gives thy pen both skill and argument"

    In the context of poetry, what is the best definition of tone?

    the speaker's attitude toward the subject of the poem

    What is the best paraphrase of line 12?

    Like everyone, she walks on the ground.

    What is the best paraphrase of line 9?

    Get up and look at his lovely face.

    Which statement best explains the two possible interpretations of the sonnet?

    The three quatrains satirize common poetic comparisons of one's beloved to beautiful things, suggesting that the speaker's feelings are not strong. However, the sudden reversal in tone in the final couplet surprises and moves through its sincerity and depth of feeling, suggesting strong emotions.

    Based on context clues, what is the meaning of graven in these lines?

    carved

    What is the central idea of the first quatrain?

    My mistress is not a perfect beauty.

    What is the structure of a Shakespearean sonnet?

    A Shakespearean sonnet has three quatrains and ends with a couplet.

    Read Shakespeare's "Sonnet 100."

    Where art thou, Muse, that thou forget'st so long

    To speak of that which gives thee all thy might?

    Spend'st thou thy fury on some worthless song,

    Darkening thy power to lend base subjects light?

    Return, forgetful Muse, and straight redeem

    In gentle numbers time so idly spent;

    Sing to the ear that doth thy lays esteem

    And gives thy pen both skill and argument.

    Rise, resty Muse, my love's sweet face survey,

    If Time have any wrinkle graven there;

    If any, be a satire to decay,

    And make Time's spoils despised every where.

    Give my love fame faster than Time wastes life;

    So thou prevent'st his scythe and crooked knife.

    What is the central idea of the sonnet?

    The speaker wants his muse to help him immortalize his love.

    Read Shakespeare's "Sonnet 100."

    Where art thou, Muse, that thou forget'st so long

    To speak of that which gives thee all thy might?

    Spend'st thou thy fury on some worthless song,

    Darkening thy power to lend base subjects light?

    Return, forgetful Muse, and straight redeem5

    In gentle numbers time so idly spent;

    Sing to the ear that doth thy lays esteem

    And gives thy pen both skill and argument.

    Rise, resty Muse, my love's sweet face survey,

    If Time have any wrinkle graven there;10

    If any, be a satire to decay,

    And make Time's spoils despised every where.

    Give my love fame faster than Time wastes life;

    So thou prevent'st his scythe and crooked knife.

    What is the best paraphrase of line 9?

    Get up and look at his lovely face.

    How many lines are in a Shakespearian sonnet?

    14

    Read the last two lines of Shakespeare's "Sonnet 130."

    And yet by heaven, I think my love as rare,

    As any she belied with false compare.

    Which context clue best supports the definition of belied as "contradicted" or "disproved"?

    "false compare"

    Read Shakespeare's "Sonnet 130."

    My mistress' eyes are nothing like the sun;

    Coral is far more red, than her lips red:

    If snow be white, why then her breasts are dun;

    If hairs be wires, black wires grow on her head.

    I have seen roses damask'd, red and white,

    But no such roses see I in her cheeks;

    And in some perfumes is there more delight

    Than in the breath that from my mistress reeks.

    I love to hear her speak, yet well I know

    That music hath a far more pleasing sound:

    I grant I never saw a goddess go,—

    My mistress, when she walks, treads on the ground:

    And yet by heaven, I think my love as rare,

    As any she belied with false compare.

    Which statement best explains the two possible interpretations of the sonnet?

    Source : quizlet.com

    How To Write A Sonnet: 3

    Want to know how to write a sonnet like one of Shakespeare’s? There is good news and bad news. The good news is that it’s easy to write a sonnet.

    How To Write A Sonnet

    Want to know how to write a sonnet like one of Shakespeare’s? There’s good news and bad news when writing sonnets. The good news is that it’s very easy to write a sonnet. The bad news is that your sonnet will unlikely ever be as good as any of Shakespeare’s… but that’s no reason not to try!

    Sonnet structure

    A sonnet expresses a single idea, but it is generally an idea that develops and expands, with multiple facets, leading to a conclusion – and all within a very specific rhyming scheme. In addition to this structure, all Shakespearean sonnets must have these two things in common:

    1. All Shakespearean sonnets have 14 lines2. All Shakespearean sonnets are written in iambic pentameter

    (Find out more about what a sonnet is, and iambic pentameter, or discover some wonderful sonnet examples from a variety of poets.)

    The 14 lines of the sonnet consist of four divisions, known as ‘quatrains’. The first three of the four sonnet divisions/quatrains have the same rhyme scheme, whilst the fourth and last division/quatrain has a different rhyme scheme:

    All Shakespearean sonnets follow this 14 line pattern and rhyming structure. So, now you have the basics, here are the three simple steps to have you writing your own sonnet in no time:

    1. Think of an idea for your sonnet

    Your sonnet must be about one single idea. It could be a feeling, like being in love. It could be some thought you’ve had about life, or about a person or about people in general. It could be about one of your favourite subjects – sport, music, movies, nature, a book you’ve read, etc.

    2. Your sonnet must rhyme in a specific pattern

    Your 14 line sonnet must be written in three sets of four lines and one set of two lines.

    1. The first quatrain will have lines that end in a rhyme scheme like this: ABAB, for example, ‘day’, ‘temperate’, ‘may’, ‘date’.

    2. The second quatrain will use different words to rhyme scheme like this: CDCD, for example, ‘shines’, ‘dimmed’, ‘declines’, ‘untrimmed’.

    3. The third quatrain needs different words again, to rhyme scheme like this: EFEF, for example, ‘fade’, ‘lowest’, ‘shade’, ‘growest’.

    4. You now have your three Shakespearean quatrains – that’s 12 lines. Remember that a Shakespearean sonnet always has 14 lines, so you need two final lines – called a couplet. The rhyme scheme for this is GG, using words you haven’t used in the rhyming so far, for example, ‘see’ and thee’.

    The rhyme pattern of your 14 line sonnet should now look like this: ABAB CDCD EFEF GG

    Simple, isn’t it?

    Let’s look at a Shakespeare sonnet 18 to understand how the rhyming works, and how the message evolves:

    First quatrain

    A: Shall I compare thee to a Summer’s day?

    B: Thou art more lovely and more temperate:

    A: Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May,

    B: And Summer’s lease hath all too short a date:

    Second quatrain

    C: Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines,

    D: And oft’ is his gold complexion dimm’d;

    C: And every fair from fair sometime declines,

    D: By chance or nature’s changing course untrimm’d:

    Third quatrain

    E: But thy eternal Summer shall not fade

    F: Nor lose possession of that fair thou owest;

    E: Nor shall Death brag thou wanderest in his shade,

    F: When in eternal lines to time thou growest:

    Couplet

    G: So long as men can breathe, or eyes can see,

    G: So long lives this, and this gives life to thee.

    The sonnet is about a single idea. Shakespeare is looking at a beautiful summer’s day which, in spite of its beauty, has limitations, and it eventually fades and dies. He’s comparing someone with that beautiful summer’s day but showing that person’s superiority to it. He works the idea through and presents the subject of the poem as having no limitations. Even eventual death won’t interfere with that because the subject will live forever in the poem, which Shakespeare suggests, will be read as long as there are people to read it.

    The rhyme scheme is used to change emphasis. Each aspect of the poems’ idea is contained in its own section with its own rhyming word pattern.

    Look at the first two quatrains again. The subject is introduced and we are told that he or she is more beautiful than a summer’s day. The defects of the summer’s day are outlined.

    Look at the third quatrain. It starts with the word ‘but.’ That marks a shift of emphasis. Now the subject’s eternal beauty is emphasised.

    Look at the couplet. It’s a summing up – an assurance that the subject’s beauty will last for as long as there are human beings on Earth. A rhyming couplet in English poetry is always very powerful, and in a sonnet, this couplet sums up and rounds off the poem. It can be used to put emphasis on the main idea, or to undermine it, or to offer a humorous perspective. And in Shakespeare it is quite frequently very personal, in some cases amounting to a personal statement.

    3. Your sonnet must have a metrical pattern

    The third step in this ‘how to write a sonnet’ guide is to write your sonnet in iambic pentameter. That means that you must use iambus.

    Iambus is another word for a two-syllable foot. The first syllable will normally be unstressed and the second stressed. For example, de/light, the sun, for/lorn, one day, re/lease. English is a perfect language for iambus because of the way the stressed and unstressed syllables work.

    Source : nosweatshakespeare.com

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    James 10 month ago
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