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    what did mothers feed their babies in the 1950s

    James

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    What did mothers feed their babies in the 1950s?

    What did mothers feed their babies in the 1950s? Historian Rima D. Apple writes in her book Mothers and Medicine. A Social History of Infant Feeding , 1890–1950 that in the United States of America most babies received breastmilk. ... Mother's milk was considered best for babies , but the ...

    What did mothers feed their babies in the 1950s?

    Sun Aug 15 2021 〉

    What did mothers feed their babies in the 1950s?

    What did mothers feed their babies in the 1950's?

    What did they feed babies before formula?

    How long did babies nurse in ancient times?

    What did they feed babies in ancient times?

    What did babies drink before formula?

    What were babies fed in ancient times?

    What were babies fed before eating?

    How long did babies nurse in ancient times?

    What did they feed babies in the 1800s?

    How did baby get feed in the old days?

    What did early humans feed babies?

    What did mothers feed their babies in the 1950s?

    What did mothers feed their babies in the 1950s?

    Historian Rima D. Apple writes in her book Mothers and Medicine. A Social History of Infant Feeding , 1890–1950 that in the United States of America most babies received breastmilk. ... Mother's milk was considered best for babies , but the quality of the breastmilk was found to be varied.

    What did mothers feed their babies in the 1950's?

    In 1950, over half of babies in the US were fed on homemade mixtures of evaporated milk ! During this time, the infant formula manufacturers began to play catch-up. By analyzing and understanding the components in breast milk, they were better able to mimic it for their products.

    What did they feed babies before formula?

    Before the invention of bottles and formula, wet nursing was the safest and most common alternative to the natural mother's breastmilk.

    How long did babies nurse in ancient times?

    In Byzantine times, the duration of breastfeeding was set at around twenty months . Colostrum was considered unsuitable and for the first days of life honey was given to newborns instead.

    What did they feed babies in ancient times?

    Infants in ancient Greece were fed wine and honey , while Indian children in the second Century AD were given "diluted wine, soups and eggs" at six months of age. In the US, donkey's milk was often seen as a suitable alternative to breast milk.

    What did babies drink before formula?

    Before the invention of bottles and formula, wet nursing was the safest and most common alternative to the natural mother's breastmilk.

    What were babies fed in ancient times?

    Our results showed that the three vessels contained ruminant animal milk , either from cows, sheep or goat. Their presence in child graves suggests they were used to feed babies animal milk, as a supplementary food during weaning.

    What were babies fed before eating?

    Urban children were given solid foods sooner than rural children. Powdered milk was often given to newborns before 1 month of age. Milk and juice were usually given in a bottle. Fruits and vegetables were usually introduced before meat and beans, and grains were usually last. Babies are fed from their mother's hands.

    How long did babies nurse in ancient times?

    In Byzantine times, the duration of breastfeeding was set at around twenty months . Colostrum was considered unsuitable and for the first days of life honey was given to newborns instead.

    What did they feed babies in the 1800s?

    This trend continued into the 1800s, in spite of expert advice that infants should drink mother's milk , if possible. Often, families hired another woman, called a wet nurse, to feed the baby. ... People recognized that glass was a better material for baby bottles. Because glass is clear, it can be cleaned more easily.

    How did baby get feed in the old days?

    When a mother died in childbirth or was unable to breastfeed, infants throughout the centuries have been fed by wet nurses . But others relied on dry-nursing, or feeding a baby without the breast.

    What did early humans feed babies?

    Prehistoric babies were bottle-fed with animal milk more than 3,000 years ago, according to new evidence. Archaeologists found traces of animal fats inside ancient clay vessels, giving a rare insight into the diets of Bronze and Iron Age infants.

    What did mothers feed their babies in the 1950s?

    19th century

    Historian Rima D. Apple writes in her book Mothers and Medicine. A Social History of Infant Feeding, 1890–1950 that in the United States of America most babies received breastmilk . ... Mother's milk was considered best for babies, but the quality of the breastmilk was found to be varied.

    Source : faq-qa.com

    Rolling back the Years: Birth and breastfeeding in the 1950s

    Sharing mothering experiences past and present My mother gave birth in the 50s and was told, like many women of her era, that her milk was “too thin” and that she should give formula. This was still a time when birth and breastfeeding were not widely discussed. When she was giving birth to me my […]

    Rolling back the Years: Birth and breastfeeding in the 1950s

    Sharing mothering experiences past and present

    My mother gave birth in the 50s and was told, like many women of her era, that her milk was “too thin” and that she should give formula. This was still a time when birth and breastfeeding were not widely discussed. When she was giving birth to me my mother remembers the woman in the next bed to her screaming all through her labour, not understanding what was happening or how her baby would come out of her body. She had gone through her whole pregnancy not understanding how she would give birth. I once asked my mother why a lady in the street was “so fat” and she hushed me in embarrassment, eventually whispering “She’s going to have a baby” like it was a terrible secret! Very different to the way many of today’s mothers-to-be are happy and confident with wearing fitted clothes that show off their pregnant bodies.

    I was four when my younger sibling was born and I don’t remember any particular discussion about it during the pregnancy but I did understand there

    was going to be a new baby. I do remember sitting at the kitchen table having a discussion about what the baby would be called and agreeing with my mother even though I did not like the name. I am not sure if that said something about my feelings for the new baby!

    Home Birth

    My younger sibling was born at home. This was the norm for second babies at that time and my mother’s request to be in hospital was refused. What a difference to a few years later when women had to fight for a home birth. It wasn’t all calm and relaxed though. There were no phones in homes in those days and when my mother went into labour my father had to cycle to the midwife’s house to tell her. The midwife notified the doctor who came to see my mother and gave her an injection which the midwife said was to slow down her labour. The doctor had a round of golf booked and wanted to finish it before the delivery. Imagine the outcry if a mother found that had happened to her today! As it happened the baby did not wait and when the doctor came back the midwife had done the job needed.

    I don’t remember much about those early days but I do have a very vivid memory of the midwife asking me if I would like to see mummy feeding the baby. I was engrossed in a story about a rabbit on Listen with mother – a radio programme for children on at 2pm every afternoon, so I guess this was the ‘2 o’clock feed’. I said I would look when the story was over. “You’ll miss it then”, said the midwife. 10 minutes later I wandered into the bedroom to the strange and puzzling sight of my mother having cream massaged into her by the midwife. “I want to see the baby being fed” I said. “You are too late”, said the midwife.

    Leave them to cry, it’s good for them

    I don’t have a clear memory of seeing my mother breastfeed my sister, although she tells me she feed for about six weeks. I do remember her asking me if I could please rock the pram containing my screaming sibling for a while so she could try to get something done. I spent a lot of time rocking the pram, when it wasn’t pushed to the end of the garden. This was what women were told in those days – put the baby at the bottom of the garden where you won’t hear it cry.

    In 1939 Marie Stopes had written a book called Your Baby’s First Year in which she advised that in the first month a baby would sleep for 22 hours a day. By the third to fifth month it would need 20 hours sleep a day, and from seven to twelve months 18 hours of sleep. These figures are clearly abnormal and unachievable and many mothers must have been in despair when they could not get their baby to comply.

    Mrs Frankenburg, Common Sense in the Nursery, (1922, 34, 54) told mothers than a baby’s lungs did not expand to their full extent unless they were exercised every day. ‘If Nature is regularly thwarted by some well-meaning person who picks up the baby and distracts his attention after the first squeak, there is a risk of the lungs remaining almost unexpanded!’ She adds for good measure the case of a baby who died of pneumonia at 8 months because he had never been allowed to cry at all!

    Marie Stopes agreed that ‘a couple of minutes good bawl between the time he is waked for his feed and the time he has the nipple of his mother’s breast in his mouth’ was a necessary exercise. She did warn against overdoing it, such as the trained nurse who tormented the child for half an hour a day to make him cry! (i)

    And even now….

    Leaving babies to cry because it is good for them is a long way from the calmness we aim for today, and yet some modern day “gurus” still cling to this idea. In her recently republished book The Baby Book “maternity guru” Rachel Waddilove says she teaches mothers that it is ok for babies to cry. In a comment which could be an echo of the statements above, she says “Very often a baby’s normal way to go to sleep is to have a shout, air their lungs. If you rush in you interrupt the pattern of them falling asleep”. It’s strange but I don’t notice adults having to cry themselves to sleep, or if they are I think they need someone to comfort them – just as babies do.

    If we could only go back…

    Just because mothers left their babies to cry believing it to be the right thing didn’t mean their hearts weren’t breaking. Years later, as she watched me and my sister breastfeed our own babies, my mother said she wished I could have told her then all the things I was going to know in the future. She said she would give anything to be able to go back and change things, and that is a feeling many of us can understand. I imagine there are not many women who don’t look back with hindsight and wish some things had been different.

    Source : www.laleche.org.uk

    Historical Baby Information • My Mom's a Nerd

    We learn about the history of infant formula, baby care, and hospitals with several fascinating vintage documents from the 1950s-1970s.

    Historical Baby Information

    I’ve come across some interesting historical baby- related advice. And wow, it doesn’t age well! Take a look at this information from hospitals in 1950-1968. And a 1950s baby formula recipe. It’s amazing how things have changed in just a few generations! We’ve learned a lot since that time. Scientifically, we know it’s probably not a good idea to feed a newborn juice in a baby bottle. But historically, parents did it for a good reason. And now, dads can attend their children’s birth, or be around mom when she’s nursing. Plus, I discovered a receipt from a hospital for a baby being delivered in 1950!

    I find these types of documents fascinating. This is a peek into what my grandparent’s life was like when they were raising my parents!

    Table of Contents

    Instructions for Mothers

    Baby Formulas in the 1950s and 1960s- Homemade Baby Formula Recipes

    Hospital Receipt for Baby Delivery in 1950

    Conclusions

    Instructions for Mothers

    First we have Instructions for Mothers from a hospital in 1968. This is clearly some sort of official form that hospitals handed out to new moms. It’s even labeled as Form #17. Back at that time, dad wasn’t allowed into the delivery room, or in the room while mom was nursing.

    Often, doctors recommended that parents keep their baby on a strict schedule, like you see here for babies visiting mom at 9-10am 1-2pm, 5:30-6:30pm, and 9-10pm. As far back as the late 1800s, scheduling your baby became common, especially as the factories of the industrial revolution made parents follow schedules.

    I love the very specific instructions of not eating green coconut cake. Is blue coconut cake okay? It’s not on the list…

    If the green coconut cake looked like this, I definitely wouldn’t want to eat it!

    But the food instructions may have been onto something, or may be just as silly as what we do today. Cabbage may reduce breast milk production in mom. Doctors go back and forth on whether babies should be exposed to nuts, and when. Chocolate contains caffeine, which nursing women should limit, and supposedly may give babies diarrhea.

    Baby Formulas in the 1950s and 1960s- Homemade Baby Formula Recipes

    What kind of tea do you think doctors recommend? Jasmine? Chamomile?

    Babies in my parent’s generation often drank evaporated milk mixed with water and corn syrup (Karo is a specific corn syrup brand) instead of formula! Plus they could have tea, vitamins (whatever that means) at 10 days, and diluted orange juice at three weeks! Turns out babies who were fed formula often got juice because of its Vitamin C content, which prevented scurvy. Babies can probably taste the different flavors at birth… not that we recommend feeding babies these things these days!

    This doctor recommends bathing the cord three times a day  and offering boiled water.

    I did some digging around this one. Doctors and hospitals gave these standard forms out, with instructions for moms to make their own infant formulas. In the 1950s, as many as half the babies in the US were fed these types of mixtures of evaporated milk, water, and sugar, like corn syrup or honey!

    Today I learned about Mercurochrome, an antiseptic used until the US and other countries banned it in 1998 due to the potential for mercury poisoning.

    There’s even a pink version of this form for girls.

    I can hardly imagine mixing up a big old batch of water, sugar, and evaporated milk, then dividing it into individual bottles! Especially with those weird measurements like 13 ounces of evaporated milk. Pretty sure that’s not a standard size!

    Next, I read into the history of infant formula and it’s fascinating, at least to an engineer like me! When moms couldn’t nurse their babies, at first, they would concoct mixtures of animal milk and other stuff- usually cow’s milk, water, cream, and sugar, or honey. A few companies, like Nestle, also offered commercial infant formulas as early as the 1860s.

    A 1915 ad Nestle’s Food infant formula. At first, formulas were recommended instead of cow’s milk, but never instead mom’s milk.

    Source : mymomsanerd.com

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