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    what city was the first capital of the united states

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    Philly the first – where was the USA’s first capital? – Almost History

    What was the capital of the United States? It certainly wasn’t Washington, D.C. – the nation’s current capital city wasn’t approved by the US Congress until 16 July 1790 and wasn’t founded until 1791.

    Philly the first – where was the USA’s first capital?

    What was the capital of the United States? It certainly wasn’t Washington, D.C. – the nation’s current capital city wasn’t approved by the US Congress until 16 July 1790 and wasn’t founded until 1791.

    So which American city can claim to be the first capital? It is a surprisingly difficult question to answer – different places served as temporary capitals at different stages in the USA’s constitutional evolution from 13 colonies to independent nation state.

    The First Continental Congress met in the Carpenter’s Hall in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1774. This fact gives Philly a strong claim for pre-eminence in the first capital question. It certainly sells this role in history with the historical quarter around Independence Hall, the Liberty Bell and the Constitution Centre. Philadelphia’s position was bolstered by hosting the Second Continental Congress in 1775.

    The capital of America under the Articles of Confederation was a travelling political carnival, taking in Philadelphia, Princeton, Annapolis, Trenton and New York. After the Constitution was brought in force in 1789, the United States Congress first convened briefly in New York’s Federal Hall before settling in Philadelphia in 1790 until it finally moved to its new, permanent home in Washington, D.C. a decade later in 1800.

    So it is impossible to say which city was the first capital of the United States without determining which United States is being discussed:

    First Continental Congress – Carpenter’s Hall, Philadelphia

    Second Contintental Congress – Independence Hall, Philadelphia

    Articles of Confederation – Independence Hall, Philadelphia

    United States Constitution – Federal Hall, New York City

    Similarly, the Supreme Court of the United States met in different places before settling in Washington, D.C. in 1800. It first met in New York City, at the Merchants’ Exchange Building, in 1790. The Court followed Congress in moving to Philadelphia in 1791, first setting up shop in Independence Hall and then occupying the Old City Hall.

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    Source : www.vaguelyinteresting.co.uk

    About the USA > U.S. Government > The Nation's Capital

    U.S. Government > The Nation's CapitalIntroduction | The Constitution | The Executive Branch

    The Legislative Branch | The Judicial Branch | State Government | Local Government

    Political Parties | Elections | The Nation's Capital | The Flag | The National Anthem

    The Great Seal | The Pledge of Allegiance

    What kind of information materials are available?

    District of ColumbiaBackground

    · City Beautiful: The 1901 Plan for Washington D.C.

    · Council of the District of Columbia

    · Explore Washington D.C.: Gateway to America's Capital

    · The Mall: The Grand Avenue, the Government and the People

    · Map of Washington D.C CD· National Mall and Memorial Parks (National Park Service)· The U.S. Capitol (Architect of the Capitol)· Washington D.C. (The Columbia Encyclopedia)· Washington, D.C. (The American Experience)· Washington D.C. (Magazin USA) Deutsch· Washington D.C.: A National Register of Historic Places Travel Itinerary· Washington: The Nation's Capital: Historical Timeline CD· Welcome to the DC Chamber of CommerceStatistics

    · Facts and Figures: Anniversary of Washington, D.C., as Nation's Capital (U.S. Census Bureau) CD

    · District of Columbia Quick Facts (U.S. Census Bureau)

    New York City was the first capital of the United States once the Constitution was ratified. George Washington took the oath of office to become the first President of the United States from the balcony of the old City Hall.

    One of the issues the President had to deal with was a permanent location for the country’s seat of government. As part of a compromise, it was decided that the capital would move to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1791 for ten years and then to a suitable permanent location on the Potomac River. Washington chose an area that included land from the states of Maryland and Virginia. At this time the area was primarily farm and marsh lands. Congress was scheduled to meet in the new capital on the first Monday in December 1800.

    Pierre Charles L’Enfant was hired to design the "Federal City." On June 11, 1800, the capital of the United States had a permanent home in Washington, D.C.

    See also:

    About the USA > Travel & Geography > The States & Territories > Washington D. C.

    Exhibits - Digital Images · American Treasures of the Library of Congress: The Nation's Capital· Temple of Liberty: Building the Capitol of a New Nation· U.S. Capitol Historical SocietyFor High School Students

    · America's Story for America's Library: Washington DC (Library of Congress)

    · Ben's Guide to Government Buildings: The Supreme Court Building· Ben's Guide to Statues and Memorials: The Washington Monument· Washington D.C. (Internet Public Library)Teacher Resources

    · America's Story for America's Library: Washington DC (Library of Congress)

    · George Washington: The Living Symbol (Edsitement)· A Landmark Lesson: The United States Capitol Building (Edsitement)Link List· Internet Public Library: Washington D.C.

    · Cultural Tourism D.C.

    · District of Columbia Government Sites

    · House of Representatives: Visiting DC· House of Representatives: Washington D.C. - Tourist Information

    · Washington Post: Washington DC Visitor's Guide

    · Washington DC Web Site Directory· U.S. Senate: Online Visitors Center· Yahoo! > Travel > Washington D.C.· Yahoo! > Directory > Washington D.C.

    Texts are abridged from U.S. State Department IIP publications and other U.S. government materials.

    What kind of information materials are available?

    CD: These documents are available in fulltext format on the About the USA CD-ROM. Teachers: Request a copy for classroom use.

    L: Selected documents are available in German as well as other languages, including Arabic, Chinese, French, Spanish, Persian and Turkish.DISCLAIMER

    Any reference obtained from this server to a specific commercial product, process, or service does not constitute or imply an endorsement by the United States Government of the product, process, or service, or its producer or provider. The views and opinions expressed in any referenced document do not necessarily state or reflect those of the United States Government.

    U.S. Diplomatic Mission to Germany /Public Affairs/ Information Resource Centers 

    Updated: February 2009

    Source : usa.usembassy.de

    U.S. Senate: The Nine Capitals of the United States

    Nine Capitals of the United States

    The Nine Capitals of the United States

    Robert Fortenbaugh (1948)

    (Out of print.)

    Representatives from the 13 colonies convened the First Continental Congress in Philadelphia in 1774. The following year the Second Continental Congress met at Philadelphia's State-House. Baltimore; Lancaster, Pennsylvania; York, Pennsylvania; and College Hall in Philadelphia were also meeting sites for the Second Continental Congress.

    Under the Articles of Confederation, from 1781 to 1788, Congress convened in Philadelphia; Princeton, New Jersey; Annapolis, Maryland; Trenton, New Jersey; and New York.  Since the U.S. Congress was established by the Constitution in 1789, it has convened in three locations:  New York, Philadelphia, and its permanent home in Washington, D.C.

    details why the Continental Congress, Congress under the Articles of Confederation, and the U.S. Congress moved from place to place until a permanent capital was established in Washington, D.C.   Each chapter gives historical information on the events surrounding the move to the city, what business occurred there, and why the government moved on. Robert Fortenbaugh provides a rare analysis describing the little-known fact that there were nine capitals of the United States.

    In November 2000, the U.S. Congress commemorated two centuries of residence in Washington, D.C. Learn more about the numerous chambers the Senate and House of Representatives have occupied in Washington.

    Chronological Table of the CapitalsFirst Continental Congress

    September 5, 1774 to October 24, 1774:

    Second Continental Congress

    May 10, 1775 to December 12, 1776:

    December 20, 1776 to February 27, 1777:

    March 4, 1777 to September 18, 1777:

    September 27, 1777 (one day):

    September 30, 1777 to June 27, 1778:

    July 2, 1778 to March 1, 1781:

    Congress under the Articles of Confederation

    March 1, 1781 to June 21, 1783:

    June 30, 1783 to November 4, 1783:

    November 26, 1783 to August 19, 1784:

    November 1, 1784 to December 24, 1784:

    January 11, 1785 to Autumn 1788:

    Congress under the Constitution

    March 4, 1789 to August 12, 1790:

    December 6, 1790 to May 14, 1800:

    November 17, 1800:

    SourceRobert Fortenbaugh, , page 9.

    Source : www.senate.gov

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