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    what characterizes developing economies? check all that apply. a growing industrial economy a low level of reliance on natural resources a drop in the standard of living a focus on agricultural activity a shrinking middle class

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    What characterizes developing economies? Check all that apply. a. A growing industrial economy b. A low level of reliance on natural resources c. A drop in the standard of living d. A focus on agricultural activity e. A shrinking middle class

    Answer to: What characterizes developing economies? Check all that apply. a. A growing industrial economy b. A low level of reliance on natural...

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    What characterizes developing economies? Check all that apply. a. A growing industrial economy ...

    What characterizes developing economies? Check all that apply. a. A growing industrial economy ... Question:

    What characterizes developing economies? Check all that apply.

    a. A growing industrial economy

    b. A low level of reliance on natural resources

    c. A drop in the standard of living

    d. A focus on agricultural activity

    e. A shrinking middle class

    Economics:

    Economics provides the different outlook of viewing economy which may be socialistic, scientific, business, and finances. This explains how a country can stand strong in front of the global world by expressing different economic conditions.

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    The correct answers are a. A growing industrial economy and d. A focus on agricultural activity

    When the countries are in the developing stage,...

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    Economic Development Flashcards

    Start studying Economic Development. Learn vocabulary, terms, and more with flashcards, games, and other study tools.

    Economic Development

    4.7 42 Reviews

    A country with a ________ economy generally has a high standard of living.

    a. developing b. developed c. emerging d. transitioning

    Click card to see definition 👆

    b. developed

    Click again to see term 👆

    What characterizes developing economies? Check all that apply.

    a. a growing industrial economy

    b. a low level of reliance on natural resources

    c. a drop in the standard of living

    d. a focus on agricultural activity

    e. a shrinking middle class

    Click card to see definition 👆

    a. a growing industrial economy

    d. a focus on agricultural activity

    Click again to see term 👆

    1/10 Created by sarahfenton04

    Terms in this set (10)

    A country with a ________ economy generally has a high standard of living.

    a. developing b. developed c. emerging d. transitioning b. developed

    What characterizes developing economies? Check all that apply.

    a. a growing industrial economy

    b. a low level of reliance on natural resources

    c. a drop in the standard of living

    d. a focus on agricultural activity

    e. a shrinking middle class

    a. a growing industrial economy

    d. a focus on agricultural activity

    Aging populations can be a problem for developed countries because

    a. there are fewer younger workers coming into the workforce.

    b. most older workers demand top-level pay and full benefits.

    c. many older people are skilled in manufacturing, not technology.

    d. younger workers cannot find jobs when older people work longer.

    a. there are fewer younger workers coming into the workforce.

    Read this excerpt describing the mission of the World Bank.

    The World Bank is a vital source of financial and technical assistance to developing countries around the world. It is not a bank in the common sense. Instead, it plays a different but supportive role in its mission of global poverty reduction and the improvement of living standards.

    It provides low-interest loans, interest-free credit, and grants to developing countries for education, health, infrastructure, communications, and many other purposes.

    According to this excerpt, what is one major way in which the World Bank differs from a regular bank?

    a. The World Bank is a source of financial assistance.

    b. The World Bank aims to improve living standards.

    c. The World Bank provides low-interest loans and credit.

    d. The World Bank serves people of different income levels.

    b. The World Bank aims to improve living standards.

    A country that has multinational corporations is most likely to be

    a. a developed economy.

    b. a transitioning economy.

    c. a developing economy.

    d. a control economy.

    a. a developed economy.

    Why might developed economies want to outsource manufacturing and other jobs to developing economies?

    a. Developed economies can find more inexpensive labor in developing economies.

    b. Developed economies are responsible for helping developing economies progress.

    c. Developed economies focus only on service, not manufacturing, so they must outsource.

    d. Developing economies produce higher-quality goods, so it makes sense to outsource.

    a. Developed economies can find more inexpensive labor in developing economies.

    In a transitional economy, a(n) ________ economy is changing to a mixed-market economy.

    a. advanced b. command c. free-market d. developed b. command

    The Czech Republic's decision in 2003 to join the European Union indicated that the Czech Republic

    a. was now equal in wealth to all other European nations.

    b. would give all economic control to the European Union.

    c. was willing to forge economic ties with other nations.

    d. would eventually achieve a mixed-market economy.

    c. was willing to forge economic ties with other nations.

    In a transitioning economy, what is a downside of rapid economic growth?

    a. Rapid economic growth can be difficult to regulate.

    b. Rapid economic growth benefits only the wealthy.

    c. Rapid economic growth usually leads to a crash.

    d. Rapid economic growth may stifle cultural growth.

    a. Rapid economic growth can be difficult to regulate.

    One factor that indicates a developed economy's standard of living is its

    a. growth in outsourcing rates.

    b. strong social connections.

    c. high levels of education.

    d. low GDP per capita.

    c. high levels of education.

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    Turkey Overview: Development news, research, data

    Turkey’s economy grew 11 percent in 2021, the fastest among the G20 countries, as COVID-19-related measures were gradually relaxed in Turkey and abroad.

    The World Bank in Turkey

    Turkey has quickly adopted measures to help contain the spread of COVID-19 and save lives, whilst providing economic support to affected firms and households. The economic outlook is more uncertain, than usual and will depend on how quickly this unprecedented crisis can be brought under control.

    Overview

    Context Strategy Economy

    Country Context

    TURKEY2021

    Population, million 84.1

    GDP, current US$ billion

    810.0

    GDP per capita, current US$

    9,626.1

    Life Expectancy at Birth, years

    77.7

    Turkey’s economy grew 11 percent in 2021, the fastest among the G20 countries, as COVID-19-related measures were gradually relaxed in Turkey and abroad. Although Turkey’s interest rate cuts from September supported demand, they also amplified macro-financial instability, which, combined with spillovers from the Ukraine-Russia war, will lower 2022 growth to 1.4 percent. Rising energy and food price inflation will hurt the poor the most, compromising a gradual employment-driven, post-pandemic poverty recovery.

    Turkey enjoyed high growth rates between 2002 and 2017 that propelled the country to the higher reaches of upper-middle-income status. But productivity growth slowed as reform momentum waned over the past decade, and efforts turned to supporting growth with credit booms and a demand stimulus, exacerbating internal and external vulnerabilities. High private sector debt, persistent current account deficits financed by short-term portfolio flows, high inflation, and high unemployment have been intensified by macro-financial instability since August 2018. Moreover, the economy’s high energy and carbon intensity make it vulnerable to global energy supply and price volatility and pose a challenge for Turkey’s exporters in the context of global and regional decarbonization policies.

    The Turkish economy experienced an exchange rate crisis in the second half of 2018 that resulted in weak growth performance in 2019. By early 2020 the economy had started to recover, just as it was hit by the COVID-19 crisis in the second quarter of the year. However, Turkey was among the few countries with a positive growth performance in 2020 (at 1.8 percent), on account of a sizable credit push by the Government. Turkey’s growth accelerated to the highest rate among G20 countries in 2021 (at 11 percent) as COVID-19-related measures were gradually relaxed in Turkey and abroad and authorities loosened monetary policy. However, the monetary stimulus also caused deteriorating macro-financial conditions. The lira depreciated to record lows and inflation rose to record highs, with the former reaching a peak of 18.00 to the U.S. dollar on December 20, 2021, and the latter reaching 61.1 percent year-on-year in March 2022. External and fiscal buffers deteriorated as the Central Bank dipped into foreign reserves to support the lira and the Government deployed tax rate reductions and fuel subsidies to dampen the impact of inflation.

    The Russian invasion of Ukraine is amplifying the headwinds facing the Turkish economy. Given Turkey’s close economic ties to both Russia and Ukraine, the war is expected to disrupt Turkey’s energy and agricultural trade, tourist arrivals, and overseas construction activities. Price spikes of essential commodity imports will directly affect households and industry and adversely impact the current account balance and inflation. Low-income households in Turkey are especially affected as they spend nearly twice as much of their budget as the wealthiest on food and housing.

    Last Updated: Apr 19, 2022

    RELATED

    Turkey Country Partnership Strategy 2018 - 2021

    LENDING

    Turkey: Commitments by Fiscal Year (in millions of dollars)*

    1,492 1,113 1,855 1,500 641 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 0 500 1000 1500 2000

    *Amounts include IBRD and IDA commitments

    MULTIMEDIA

    @[email protected]#=img=# VIDEO SEP 08, 2021

    Turkey Takes Action to Improve Transportation in Cities

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    THE WORLD BANK GROUP

    International Finance Corporation

    Multilateral Investment Guarantee Agency

    STAY CONNECTED

    PHOTO GALLERY MORE PHOTOS

    In Depth

    @[email protected]#=img=#

    Safe & Resilient Schools

    Safe & Resilient Schools

    Future is Equal Future is Equal

    Women’s Co-Operatives

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    Additional Resources

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    Turkey Country Partnership Strategy 2018 - 2021

    Country Office Contacts

    Ankara, Turkey

    Ugur Mumcu Cad. No:88 2nd Floor,

    +90 312 4598300

    [email protected]

    Source : www.worldbank.org

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